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Universities and colleges
Appalachian State University
by Martin, James I., Sr. Appalachian State University had its origins as Watauga Academy, which, under the leadership of Dauphin Disco Dougherty and Blanford Barnard Dougherty, opened in Boone in September 1899. Blanford [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Barber-Scotia College
by Wadelington, Charles W. Barber-Scotia College was founded in Concord in 1867 as Scotia Seminary, a Presbyterian preparatory school for young, newly freed African American women. For more than a generation the institute [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Barton College
by Martin, James I., Sr. Barton College, originally called Atlantic Christian College, dates to 1886, when the Committee on Education for the Disciples of Christ expressed a desire to establish a collegiate institute in [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Belmont Abbey College
by Martin, James I., Sr. Belmont Abbey College, located in Belmont (Gaston County), is a Benedictine Catholic college that was founded in 1876. In that year, Father Jeremiah O'Connell purchased the 500-acre Caldwell Place, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Bennett College
by Wadelington, Charles W. Bennett College, in Greensboro, began in 1873 as a coeducational academy for African American youth. The school was founded through the motivation of newly freed slaves, but the Freedman's Aid and [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Black Mountain College
by Williams, Wiley J., Vocci, Robert Blair. Black Mountain College by Wiley J. Williams and Robert Blair Vocci, 2006 Black Mountain College, an [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Brevard College
by Martin, James I., Sr. Brevard College, a United Methodist institution located in the mountain town of Brevard, was named for Ephraim Brevard, a teacher and one of the local leaders that produced the Mecklenburg Resolves [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Bruner, James Dowden
by Taylor, R. Hargus. James Dowden Bruner, educator and college administrator, was born in Leitchfield, Ky., the son of Isaac Willis and Maggie Ellen Rogers Bruner. The recipient of an early classical education, he was [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Campbell University
by Faulkner, Ronnie W. Campbell University, a Baptist institution of higher learning located in Buies Creek, started as Buies Creek Academy in 1887 with an enrollment of 21 students. The school was founded by James [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Carolina Female College
by Kilmon, Deena Deese. Carolina Female College was established in Anson County by an act of the North Carolina legislature in 1850. At the time of its founding, it was one of 13 schools for young women in the state. Women [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Catawba College
by Williams, Wiley J. Catawba College by Wiley J. Williams, 2006\ See also: Private Education; Private Higher Education Catawba College was founded in Newton in 1851 by the German Reformed Church. During the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Chowan College
by Martin, James I., Sr. Chowan College, a four-year institution affiliated with the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina, is located in Murfreesboro in the northeastern part of the state. The college traces its [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
College of Design
by Williams, Wiley J. In 1946 the consolidated University of North Carolina trustees created the School of Architecture and Landscape Design at North Carolina State University in Raleigh, combining the landscape [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Concordia College
by Williams, Wiley J. Concordia College by Wiley J. Williams, 2006 Concordia College was established in Conover in 1877 as Concordia High School by the Lutherans of the Tennessee Synod. It was converted into a [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Davenport College
by Cross, Jerry L. Davenport College was established in Lenoir in 1855 by the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, as an institution of higher learning for women. It was named for William Davenport, the largest [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Davidson College
by Martin, James I., Sr. Davidson College, located in the town of Davidson, opened its doors in 1837 under the auspices of the Concord (western North Carolina) and Bethel (upcountry South Carolina) Presbyteries as a manual [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Duke University
by Durden, Robert F. Duke University by Robert F. Durden, 2006 See also: Trinity College; Duke Endowment; Duke Homestead; Duke Power Company; Sarah P. Duke Gardens; W. Duke, Sons and Company; Private Education; [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
East Carolina University
by Martin, James I., Sr. East Carolina University, located in Greenville, traces its origins to the East Carolina Teachers Training School, which came into existence amid substantial controversy in 1907. After competing with [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
East Coast Bible College
by Sustar, T. David. East Coast Bible College, affiliated with the Church of God, was founded in 1976 on a 100-acre campus west of downtown Charlotte. The college began offering a four-year degree in 1978. By the late [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Elizabeth City State University
by Wadelington, Charles W. Elizabeth City State University by Charles W. Wadelington, 2006 See also: University of North Carolina System Elizabeth City State University in Elizabeth City was founded in 1891 as the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Elon University
by Troxler, George W. Elon University was founded near Burlington in 1889 by the Christian Church (later part of the United Church of Christ). Two denominational junior colleges were forerunners of Elon: Graham Normal [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Era of Progress and Promise: Browse institutions by location
by Allen, Christy E. Era of Progress and Promise: Browse institutions by location by Christy E. Allen, 2009. Book compiled by W. N. Hartshorn of Clifton, Massachusetts in 1910, concerning the Clifton Conference of [...] (from NC Digital Collections.)
Era of Progress and Promise: Browse instutions by name
by Allen, Christy E. Era of Progress and Promise: Browse institutions by name by Christy E. Allen, 2009. Book compiled by W. N. Hartshorn of Clifton, Massachusetts in 1910, concerning the Clifton Conference of [...] (from NC Digital Collections.)
Eureka College
by Pelt, Michael R. Eureka College was established by the North Carolina Free Will Baptists in 1898 as the Free Will Baptist Theological College in Pitt County. A building large enough to accommodate the school was [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Fayetteville State University
by Wadelington, Charles W. Fayetteville State University had its beginnings in 1867, when seven progressive African American citizens paid $140 for a lot on Fayetteville's Gillespie Street and converted themselves into a [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Ferebee, Percy Bell
by Stephens, George Myers. Ferebee, Percy Bell by George Myers Stephens, 1986 29 May 1891–30 Dec. 1970 Percy Bell Ferebee, banker and developer, was born in [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Foundations Bible College
by Hairr, John. Foundations Bible College is a nondenominational, fundamentalist, separatist Christian institution located in Harnett County near Dunn. The college was founded in 1974 by O. Talmadge Spence, a [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Fraternities and Sororities
by Bullard, Brian, Caldwell, Martha Belle. Fraternities and Sororities, officially called National Collegiate Social Greek Letter Societies, have been present in North Carolina since at least 1812 and form a significant presence on the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Gardner-Webb University
by Martin, James I., Sr. Gardner-Webb University, a coeducational institution associated with the Baptist State Convention of North Carolina, is located near Shelby in Cleveland County. The youngest of North Carolina's [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Governor's Commission on Education beyond High School
by Fountain, Benjamin Eagles, Jr. Governor's Commission on Education beyond High School by Benjamin Eagles Fountain Jr., 2006 See also: Community Colleges The Governor's Commission on Education beyond High School, commonly [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Graham, Frank Porter
by Sitterson, J. Carlyle. Frank Porter Graham, university president, U.S. senator, and United Nations mediator, was born in Fayetteville, the son of Alexander and Katherine Bryan Sloan Graham. His father was a major founder [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Guilford College
by Stoesen, Alexander R. Guilford College, affiliated with the Society of Friends (Quakers), is the third-oldest coeducational institution in the nation. Located in Greensboro, the school was opened in 1837 by the Quakers as [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Hammer, Minnie Lee Hancock
by Rives, Ralph Hardee. Minnie Lee Hancock Hammer, religious, civic, and cultural leader, and newspaper manager, was the daughter of Dr. J. M. and Jane Page Hancock and the granddaughter of James Page, doorkeeper in the [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
High Point University
by McCaslin, Richard B. High Point University, situated in southwestern Guilford County, was founded in 1924 by the Methodist Protestant Church. Led by Joseph F. McCulloch, Methodists desiring to build a college in North [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Hooper, John De Berniere
by Wallace, Carolyn A. John De Berniere Hooper, educator, was born at Smithville (now Southport), the second son of Archibald Maclaine and Charlotte De Berniere Hooper. He was called by his middle name of De Berniere or, [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Hunter, Aaron Burtis
by Bennington, Catherine Myers. Aaron Burtis Hunter, Episcopal clergyman, educator, book collector, and philanthropist, was born in Philadelphia, Pa., the son of John C. and Sarah A. Clark Hunter. After graduation from public [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Immanuel College
by Calhoon, Robert M. Immanuel College in Greensboro was a residential high school, junior college, and theological seminary for African Americans operated by the Missouri Synod of the Lutheran Church from 1903 to 1961. [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Jarrell, Randall
by Farnham, Mary. Randall Jarrell, poet, critic, and teacher, was born in Nashville, Tenn., the son of Owen and Anna Campbell Jarrell. Owing to his parents' divorce, much of his childhood through 1927 was spent in [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Johnson C. Smith University
by Martin, James I., Sr. Johnson C. Smith University, a historically African American institution associated with the Presbyterian Church, was established in Charlotte in 1867 as a "freedman's school" under the auspices of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Jones, James Addison
by Stafford, Garland R. James Addison Jones, construction contractor, civic leader, and philanthropist, was born near Lexington in Davidson County, the son of Robert J. and Elizabeth Horney Jones. His parents were [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Jordan, Charles Edward
by Green, C. Sylvester. Jordan, Charles Edward by C. Sylvester Green, 1988 13 Apr. 1901–4 Feb. 1974 See also:  Benjamin Everett Jordan (from the Dictionary of North Carolina [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Law Schools
by Mitchell, Memory F. In the eighteenth and early nineteenth century, legal education in North Carolina was a haphazard undertaking. A young law student studied on his own or under the tutelage of a licensed lawyer, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Leavitt, Sturgis Elleno
by Stoudemire, Sterling. Leavitt, Sturgis Elleno by Sterling Stoudemire, 1991 24 Jan. 1888–3 Mar. 1976 Sturgis Elleno Leavitt, teacher and scholar, was born in Newhall, Maine, the son of William Hooper and Mary [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Lees-McRae College
by Pleasants, Julian M. Lees-McRae College, located in Banner Elk, is an independent, coeducational institution affiliated with the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). It was founded in 1900 by Edgar Tufts as part of an [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Leonard Medical School
by Murray, Elizabeth Reid. The Leonard Medical School, established in Raleigh by Shaw University in 1880, trained more than 400 African American physicians during the nearly 40 years of its existence. Soon after Henry Martin [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Liberty Hall
by Lillard, Stewart. Liberty Hall, an eighteenth-century academy of higher learning in Mecklenburg County located in the former Queen's Museum building in Charlotte, was the product of Hezekiah Alexander and Waightstill [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
London, Arthur Hill, Jr.
by Green, C. Sylvester. London, Arthur Hill, Jr. by C. Sylvester Green, 1991 5 July 1903–24 Apr. 1976 Arthur Hill London, Jr., pediatrician and medical educator, was born in Pittsboro, the son of Arthur Hill, Sr., [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
London, Fritz Wolfgang
by Stauter, Mark C. Fritz Wolfgang London, physicist and theoretical chemist, was born in Breslau, Germany (now Wroclaw, Poland), the son of Franz and Luise Hamburger London. In 1904 his father, a professor of [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
London, Henry Armand
by Smith, Claiborne T., Jr. London, Henry Armand by Claiborne T. Smith, Jr., 1991 1 Mar. 1846–20 Jan. 1918 Henry Armand London, journalist and lawyer, was born in [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Madison, Robert Lee
by Conway, Robert O. Madison, Robert Lee by Robert O. Conway, 1991 17 Feb. 1867–2 Oct. 1954 See also: Western Carolina [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Malcolm X Liberation University
by Toosi, Nahal. Malcolm X Liberation University (MXLU), an experimental institution of higher education focusing on African American history and life, opened in Durham in October 1969. Named for slain black leader [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Manual Labor Schools
by Fowlkes, Jim. Manual labor schools were the forerunner of the North Carolina Community College System. They were created to provide an education that would help young people become working members of their [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Mars Hill College
by Martin, James I., Sr. Mars Hill College, a Baptist institution located 18 miles north of Asheville, traces its origins to the French Broad Baptist Academy, which opened its doors in 1856 on land donated by Edward Carter. [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
McCorkle, Samuel Eusebius
by Taylor, Thomas T. McCorkle, Samuel Eusebius by Thomas T. Taylor, 1991 23 Aug. 1746–21 Jan. [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
McNair, John Calvin
by Macfie, John. John Calvin McNair, teacher and minister, was born near St. Pauls, the son of Malcolm and Margaret Dalrymple McNair. His maternal grandfather, Archibald Dalrymple of Moore County, served in the House [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Medical Education - History
by Roberson, Francine Mary Netter. From apprenticeship to a rigorous standardized course of study, medical instruction in North Carolina has progressed step by step over the last 200 years.  The education of physicians and [...] (from NCpedia.)
Medical Schools
by Powell, William S., Johnson, K. Todd, Wright, Marilyn. Medical education for North Carolinians who desired to become physicians in the eighteenth or nineteenth century was generally obtained through a program of apprenticeship. In the absence of formal [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Meredith College
by Williford, Jo Ann. Meredith College, the largest private college for women in the Southeast, is a four-year, liberal arts institution located in Raleigh. It owes its origins to Thomas Meredith, who in 1838, along with [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Mitchell, William Watson
by Jordan, John R., Jr. William Watson Mitchell, lay leader and benefactor of Baptist causes, planter, and civic leader, was born in Bertie County, the son of William and Rena Mitchell. As a young man he moved from Bertie [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Montreat College
by Mitchell, Ted. Montreat College, located 15 miles east of Asheville in Montreat, began in 1916 as Montreat Normal School, an institution founded by the Presbyterian Church (USA) to prepare young women to become [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Moore, Peter Weddick
by Ingram, Charles. Peter Weddick Moore, educator, was born near Faison in Duplin County, the son of Weddick and Alecy Thompson Moore, both slaves. His father allegedly was killed by the Ku Klux Klan during [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Moore, Walter William
by Spence, Thomas H., Jr. Moore, Walter William by Thomas H. Spence, Jr., 1991 14 June 1857–14 June [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Moore, William John
by Powell, William S. Moore, William John by William S. Powell, 1991 4 Apr. 1837–post-1901 See also:  African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church (from the Encyclopedia of North Carolina); African Methodist [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Mount Olive College
by Pelt, Michael R. Mount Olive College by Michael R. Pelt, 2006 In 1951 the Convention of Original Free Will Baptists authorized the establishment of a junior college that opened in 1952 at Cragmont Assembly [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University
by Wadelington, Charles W. North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University (North Carolina A&T) in Greensboro was created as the Agricultural and Mechanical College for the Colored Race by the General Assembly [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina Association of Colleges and Universities
by Williams, Wiley J. The North Carolina Association of Colleges and Universities traces its origins to October 1921 at a meeting of the state's college presidents and delegates in Greensboro. The meeting represented the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina Association of Independent Colleges and Universities
by Johnson, Lloyd. The North Carolina Association of Independent Colleges and Universities was established in 1969 by North Carolina's regionally accredited private four-year colleges and universities as an advocate [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina Central University
by Wadelington, Charles W. North Carolina Central University in Durham was the first state-supported liberal arts college for African American students in North Carolina. It was chartered as a private institution in 1909 and [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina College
by Williams, Wiley J. North Carolina College was opened in 1852 in Mount Pleasant as Western Carolina Male Academy. The school was organized by the North Carolina Synod of the Lutheran Church as "a high school of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina State University
by Harris, William C. North Carolina State University by William C. Harris, 2006 See also: Agricultural Experiment Stations; College of Design, University of North Carolina System North Carolina State [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina Wesleyan College
by Carroll, Grady L. E., Sr. North Carolina Wesleyan College, chartered in October 1956 and opened in 1960, is a four-year, coeducational, liberal arts college in Rocky Mount. It was established by citizens of Nash and Edgecombe [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina Women's Colleges
by Davison, Jennifer, Huaman, Jaime. Four years before the Declaration of Independence was signed, North Carolina’s first woman’s college was founded. Salem College in Winston-Salem is the oldest female educational establishment in the [...] (from NCpedia.)
Palmer Memorial Institute
by Wadelington, Charles W. Palmer Memorial Institute by Charles W. Wadelington, 2006 See also: Charlotte Hawkins Brown Museum. The Palmer Memorial Institute, located between [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Peace, William
by Frazier, Mrs. S. David. William Peace, merchant and philanthropist, Presbyterian layman, and founder of Peace Institute, was born in Granville County. His father, John Peace, was a wealthy planter; his mother was Margaret [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Penn, Charles Ashby
by Butler, S. Penn, Charles Ashby by Lindley, S. Butler, 1994 29 Nov. 1868–22 Oct. [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Pfeiffer University
by Carroll, Grady L. E., Sr. Pfeiffer University is a comprehensive, United Methodist-related university located on 330 wooded acres at Misenheimer in Stanly County. It was founded as Oberlin Home and School near Lenoir in 1885 [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Powell, Benjamin Edward
by Powell, William S. Benjamin Edward Powell, librarian and teacher, was born in Sunbury, Gates County, the son of Willis Warren and Beatrice Franklin Powell. In 1922 he entered Trinity College, Durham, which became Duke [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Pruden, William Dossey
by Copeland, Elizabeth H. William Dossey Pruden, lawyer, churchman, and Confederate officer, was born near Harrellsville, a son of Nathaniel and Martha Garrett Riddick Pruden. After attending Union Male Academy in his home [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Purefoy, James Simpson
by Taylor, R. Hargus. James Simpson Purefoy, merchant and Baptist clergyman, was the youngest of three sons of the Reverend John and Mary Fort Purefoy near Forestville, Wake County. His paternal great-grandfather, [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Richmond Hill Law School
by Angley, Wilson. Richmond Hill Law School by Wilson Angley, 2006 Richmond Hill Law School in [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Russell, Elbert
by Moore, J. Floyd. Russell, Elbert by J. Floyd Moore, 1994 29 Aug. 1871–21 Sept. [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Rutherford College
by Carroll, Grady L. E., Sr. Rutherford College, a forerunner of Brevard College, was established in 1853 by the Reverend Robert Laban Abernethy as a private school known as Owl Hollow Schoolhouse in Burke County. It was built [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Sacred Heart College
by Williams, Wiley J. Sacred Heart College by Wiley J. Williams, 2006 Sacred Heart College, a Roman Catholic liberal arts college for women in Belmont, was founded in 1892 at the request of Leo Haid, bishop and [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Shaw University
by Wadelington, Charles W. Shaw University by Charles W. Wadelington, 2006 See also: Private Education; Private Higher Education Shaw University, founded in Raleigh in 1865, was the first African American institution [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Smedes, Bennett
by Stoops, Martha S. Smedes, Bennett by Martha S. Stoops, 1994 7 Aug. 1837–22 Feb. 1899 Bennett Smedes, Episcopal clergyman and second [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Smith, Ezekiel Ezra
by Reidinger, Martin. Smith, Ezekiel Ezra by Martin Reidinger, 1994 23 May 1852–6 Dec. 1933 Ezekiel Ezra Smith, educator and diplomat, the son of free blacks Alexander and Caroline Smith, was [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Smith, Henry Louis
by Preyer, Norris W. Smith, Henry Louis by Norris W. Preyer, 1994 30 July 1859–27 Feb. 1951 Henry Louis Smith, physicist and college president, was [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Smith, H[ilrie] Shelton
by Powell, William S. Smith, H[ilrie] Shelton by William S. Powell, 1994 8 May 1893–8 Jan. 1987 H[ilrie] Shelton Smith, teacher and author, was born in McLeansville, the son of Henry Brooks and Lula Jane Wyrick [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Snavely, Carl Gray
by Sumner, Jim L. Snavely, Carl Gray by Jim L. Sumner, 1994 31 July 1894–12 July 1975 Carl Gray Snavely, college football coach, was born in Omaha, Nebr., the son of Charles, a Methodist minister, and Bessie [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Totten, Henry Roland
by Powell, William S. Totten, Henry Roland by William S. Powell, 1996 6 Nov. 1892–9 Feb. 1974 See also: Totten, William Theophilus, from the Dictionary of North Carolina Biography Henry Roland Totten, botanist [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Totten, William Theophilus
by Rives, Ralph Hardee. William Theophilus Totten, minister, educator, and president of Yadkin Collegiate Institute (later Yadkin College) for twenty-six years, was born in Rockingham County, the eldest son of the Reverend [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
University of North Carolina at Asheville
by Williams, Wiley J. In 1927 William Henry Jones, the principal of Biltmore School near Asheville, and Alonzo Carlton Reynolds, the Buncombe County Schools superintendent, established Buncombe County Junior College, the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
by Snider, William D. North Carolina's first state constitution, drafted in 1776, contained a provision for public support of education. However, it was not until 1789 that the state succeeded in chartering an [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
University of North Carolina at Charlotte
by Claiborne, Jack. The University of North Carolina at Charlotte began as a temporary junior college established to ease an enrollment crisis created by World War II veterans seeking an education under the GI Bill of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
University of North Carolina at Greensboro
by Trelease, Allen W. The University of North Carolina at Greensboro was chartered on 18 Feb. 1891 as the North Carolina State Normal and Industrial School with an initial appropriation of $10,000. It was the work largely [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
University of North Carolina at Pembroke
by Williams, Wiley J. The University of North Carolina at Pembroke was established on 7 Mar. 1887 as Croatan Normal School by the General Assembly at the request of the Lumbee Indians and other Native Americans in the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
University of North Carolina at Wilmington
by Stinson, Craig M. The University of North Carolina at Wilmington first opened its doors in the fall of 1947 as Wilmington College, a county-supported junior college. Classes had begun a year earlier as part of the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
University of North Carolina Press
by Craton, Lillian E. The University of North Carolina Press is a separately incorporated, not-for-profit publishing company affiliated with the University of North Carolina and located in Chapel Hill. It was founded on [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
University of North Carolina System
by Williams, Wiley J. The University of North Carolina System is comprised of 16 constituent institutions throughout the state that form a multicampus public university. Consolidation of the state's public educational [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
University of North Carolina System List
by Anonymous. University of North Carolina System List From the North Carolina Manual. Updated by staff at the Government & Heritage Library, 2012. The University of North Carolina consists of sixteen [...] (from North Carolina Manual.)
Wake Forest University
by Moore, Anne. Wake Forest University was founded in Wake Forest in 1834 by the North Carolina Baptist State Convention as a "literary and manual labor" school for young men. By 1838, however, the manual labor [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Walker, Nathan Wilson
by Bullock, J. Marshall. Walker, Nathan Wilson by J. Marshall Bullock, 1996 7 Mar. 1875–13 Feb. 1936 Nathan Wilson Walker, professor and educator, was born at Poplar Branch, Currituck County, the son of William [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Warren Wilson College
by Martin, James I., Sr. Warren Wilson College, a Presbyterian institution located ten miles east of Asheville, traces its origins to the Asheville Farm School, a missionary endeavor that opened in 1894 with 25 students. [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Weaver College
by Hill, Michael. Weaver College, a coeducational Methodist institution, operated in the Buncombe County town of Weaverville from 1873 until 1934. Prior to the establishment of what was originally known as Weaverville [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Weaver, Charles Clinton
by Stafford, Garland R. Charles Clinton Weaver, Methodist clergyman, educator, and church administrator, was born in Ashe County of Scots-Irish ancestry, the son of James Harvey and Jennie Burkett Weaver. His mother was a [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Weaver, Richard Malcolm, Jr.
by Bradford, M. E. Richard Malcolm Weaver, Jr., intellectual historian, rhetorician, and political philosopher, was born at Asheville in Buncombe County, the son of Richard Malcolm (1870–1915) and Carolyn Embry Weaver, [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Western Carolina University
by Wood, Curtis W. Western Carolina University by Curtis W. Wood, 2006 See also: University of North Carolina System Western Carolina University began as [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Western College of North Carolina
by Powell, William S. Western College of North Carolina, chartered by the General Assembly in 1820, was anticipated to be a degree-granting, nonsectarian institution similar to the state's first university, which had [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Widgery, Alban Gregory
by Green, C. Sylvester. Widgery, Alban Gregory by C. Sylvester Green, 1996 9 May 1887–22 Mar. 1968 Alban Gregory Widgery, teacher and [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Williams, Cratis Dearl
by Jones, H. G. Cratis Dearl Williams, folklorist, ballad collector and singer, linguist, professor, and college administrator, rose from humble beginnings in the Caines Creek community of Big Sandy Valley in [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Wilson Collegiate Institute
by Mooring, Phillip Arthur. Wilson Collegiate Institute, a private, nonsectarian school located in the eastern North Carolina town of Wilson, opened on 2 Jan. 1872 with 17 students and was chartered by the General Assembly on [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Wilson, Thomas James, III
by Davis, Lambert. Wilson, Thomas James, III by Lambert Davis, 1996 25 Oct. 1902–27 June 1969 Thomas James Wilson, III, educator and publisher, was born in Chapel Hill, [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Wingate University
by Surratt, Jerry L. Wingate University was established in 1896 in Union County, 26 miles southeast of Charlotte, by the Baptist Associations of Union County, N.C., and Chesterfield County, S.C. The school was built on a [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Wingate, Washington Manly
by Woodard, John R. Wingate, Washington Manly by John R. Woodard, 1996 28 July 1828–27 Feb. 1879 Washington Manly Wingate, Baptist minister and college president, was born in Darlington, S.C., the son of [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Winston-Salem State University
by Wadelington, Charles W. Winston-Salem State University was founded in Winston-Salem as the Slater Industrial Academy, a school for African Americans, on 28 Sept. 1892. Housed in a one-room frame structure, the school had 25 [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Woody, John Warren
by Hinshaw, Mary Edith Woody. John Warren Woody, educator, college president, and religious leader, was born at Saxapahaw, Alamance County, of English Quaker ancestry, the son of Nathaniel, a farmer, surveyor, and owner of land [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Worth, William Henry
by Stokes, Durward T. Worth, William Henry by Durward T. Stokes, 1996 13 July 1839–6 Feb. 1931 William Henry Worth, Farmers Alliance leader, was born on a farm in the Polecat Creek community in Guilford County. [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Wyche, Benjamin
by Powell, William S. Wyche, Benjamin by William S. Powell, 1996 12 Sept. 1869–6 May [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Wynn, Earl Raymond
by Powell, William S. Earl Raymond Wynn, educator and actor, was born in Coal Valley, Ill., the son of Zadoc Hardin and Mary Jane Ziegler Wynn. He was graduated from Augustana College, Rock Island, Ill., in 1932 and [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Wynns, Thomas
by Newbern, Thomas R. J. Thomas Wynns, congressman, state legislator, and major general of state troops, was born at Barfields, the Chowan River plantation of the Wynns family, in Hertford County. His father, Benjamin, was a [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Yadkin College
by McCaslin, Richard B. Yadkin College by Richard B. McCaslin, 2006 Yadkin College, located near the Yadkin River in Davidson County, was opened in 1856 by the Methodist Protestant Church on land donated by Henry W. [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
York, Brantley
by King, William E. York, Brantley by William E. King, 1996 3 Jan. 1805–7 Oct. 1891 Brantley York, Methodist clergyman, educator, lecturer, and author, was born near Bush Creek [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Zion-Parnassus Academy
by Suther, Steve. The Zion-Parnassus Academy was an eighteenth-century classical school located in Rowan County about a mile east of Thyatira Church (believed to be the oldest Presbyterian church in western North [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
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