Bookmark and Share

Printer-friendly versionPDF version
Average: 5 (1 vote)

North Carolina Military Installations - Civil War

Return to: North Carolina Military Installations - Civil War

Go to: North Carolina Military Installations - Civil War - Forts; North Carolina Military Installations - Civil War - Batteries.

Camps

Name
Location
Description
Camp Advance Near Weldon (Halifax County) Confederate training ground for Company H, 40th North Carolina Regiment (Heavy Artillery).
Camp Alamance Company Shops (now Burlington, Alamance County) Confederate organization point for Company F (Hawfield River Boys), 6th North Carolina Regiment.
Camp Ashe 12 miles east of Wilmington (now Scotts Hill, Pender County) Established by the 8th Regiment May 1863; part of the Confederate defense system protecting the port of Wilmington from northeast land invasion and the sound areas from Union warships.
Camp Baker Near Hamilton (Martin County) Primary headquarters of the 70th North Carolina Regiment (1st Junior Reserves), which defended several eastern counties from further Union invasion. Named for Brig. Gen. Lawrence S. Baker.
Camp Beauregard Ridgeway (Warren County) Established in May 1861 by Governor John W. Ellis as the first Confederate cavalry training ground in the state. The 1st North Carolina Cavalry Regiment (9th North Carolina Regiment) trained here, later winning one of the first cavalry encounters of the war in Vienna, Va. Named for Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard, who had earlier directed the capture of Fort Sumter.
Camp Black Jack Near Moseley Hall (now LaGrange, Lenoir County) Temporary Confederate camp established in June 1862 by the 52nd North Carolina Regiment to protect the Atlantic & North Carolina Railroad.
Camp Boylan Raleigh (Wake County) Confederate training ground of the Ellis Light Infantry and later (1862) the 49th North Carolina Regiment, commanded by Maj. Stephen D. Ramseur. Named for William Boylan, who provided the land.
Camp Campbell Near Cork Creek, south of Kinston (Lenoir County) One of several Confederate camps and picket posts guarding the area between Kinston and New Bern, occupied in the fall of 1862 by the 8th Regiment.
Camp Canal Near the Carteret County--Craven County line (north of Morehead City) Established in October 1861 by William A. Herring's Confederate artillery company (1st Company I, 36th North Carolina Regiment) to guard the Clubfoot and Harlow Creek Canal and the road between Beaufort and Adams Creek.
Camp Clarendon Garysburg (Northampton County) One of several unofficial names for the Confederate camp of instruction where the 3rd North Carolina Regiment formed and trained, June 1861.
Camp Clingman Asheville (Buncombe County) Confederate organization and training ground of the Twentieth Battalion, Junior Reserves. Named for Gen. Thomas L. Clingman, an antebellum political leader and Civil War officer.
Camp Cobb Near Wilmington (New Hanover County) Confederate camp that provided housing for recruits and troops stationed in batteries and forts defending Wilmington, the Cape Fear River, and Fort Fisher. Likely named for Gen. Howell Cobb, secretary of the treasury under President James Buchanan.
Camp Collier Near Goldsboro (Wayne County) Confederate camp briefly used by the 61st North Carolina Regiment en route to Kinston from the Wilmington area, October 1862.
Camp Crabtree Near Raleigh (Wake County) Confederate training ground (also known as Camp Carolina) established in July 1861 and commanded by Maj. Henry K. Burgwyn Jr.
Camp Daniel Near Garysburg (Northampton County) Confederate camp of instruction used by the First Battalion of Junior Reserves in preparation for joining the Sixth Battalion of Junior Reserves to form the 70th North Carolina Regiment (1st Junior Reserves). Named for Brig. Gen. Junius Daniel of Halifax County.
Camp Davis Near Wilmington (New Hanover County) Confederate camp that provided housing for recruits and troops stationed in batteries and forts defending Wilmington, the Cape Fear River, and Fort Fisher.
Camp Fisher High Point (Guilford County) Established in the fall of 1861 as one of two Confederate infantry training camps in the county. Companies organized here include the 28th, 34th, and 37th North Carolina Regiments (1861) and the 11th North Carolina Regiment (1862). Named for Col. Charles F. Fisher, the second president of the North Carolina Railroad and a casualty at the First Battle of Manassas (Bull Run).
Camp Floyd Near Weldon (Halifax County) Confederate camp of instruction that was the temporary base of the 38th North Carolina Regiment in February 1862. Likely named for Maj. Gen. John B. Floyd, secretary of war under President James Buchanan.
Camp Hill Near Asheville (Buncombe County) Confederate camp that was the temporary base of the 39th North Carolina Regiment between November 1861 and February 1862. Named for Maj. Gen. Daniel H. Hill.
Camp Hill Near Garysburg (Northampton County) One of several unofficial names for the Confederate camp of instruction where the 4th North Carolina Regiment formed and trained in May 1861. The 42nd North Carolina Regiment was also stationed here in 1863. Named for Maj. Gen. Daniel H. Hill.
Camp Holmes Near Raleigh (Wake County) Confederate camp of instruction, training ground of the 72nd Regiment (3rd Junior Reserves). Likely named for Lt. Gen. Theophilus H. Holmes.
Camp Hopkins Near Wilmington (New Hanover County) Confederate camp that provided housing for recruits and troops stationed in batteries and forts defending Wilmington, the Cape Fear River, and Fort Fisher.
Camp Johnston Near Kinston (Lenoir County) Confederate camp occupied by the 52nd North Carolina Regiment in April 1862.
Camp Lamb Near Wilmington (New Hanover County) Confederate camp that provided housing for recruits and troops stationed in batteries and forts defending Wilmington, the Cape Fear River, and Fort Fisher. Named for Col. William Lamb, commander of Fort Fisher.
Camp Leventhorpe Near Garysburg (Northampton County) One of several unofficial names for the Confederate camp of instruction where the 38th North Carolina Regiment formed and trained in February 1862. Named for Brig. Gen. Collett Leventhorpe.
Camp Long Near Garysburg (Northampton County) One of several unofficial names for the Confederate camp of instruction where the 5th North Carolina Cavalry (63rd North Carolina Regiment) formed and trained in the fall of 1862. Named for Lt. Col. John O. Long.
Camp McLean Near Goldsboro (Wayne County) Temporary base of many Confederate units, including the 72nd North Carolina Regiment (3rd Junior Reserves), guarding rail and river approaches to Goldsboro. Likely named for Gen. A. D. McLean of Cumberland County.
Camp Macon Near Warrenton (Warren County) Confederate camp and site of organization of the 8th North Carolina Regiment. Likely named for Nathaniel Macon of Warren County.
Camp Mangum Raleigh (Wake County) Primary Confederate camp of instruction in North Carolina. Its commanders included Maj. Gens. Daniel H. Hill and Stephen D. Ramseur.
Camp Mason Near Graham (Alamance County) First military base of the 7th North Carolina Regiment, organized and mustered in August 1861.
Camp Mason Near Goldsboro (Wayne County) Temporary base of many Confederate units guarding rail and river approaches to Goldsboro.
Camp Patton Near Asheville (Buncombe County) Confederate camp of instruction where Capt. Robert B. Vance, commander of Company A, Buncombe Life Guards, stationed his company in the summer of 1861 before they joined the 29th North Carolina Regiment.
Camp Radcliffe Near Smithville (Brunswick County) Confederate camp established and occupied by the 61st North Carolina Regiment in the fall of 1862. Named for Col. James D. Radcliffe.
Camp Ransom Near Garysburg (Northampton County) One of several unofficial names for the Confederate camp of instruction used by the Sixth Battalion, Junior Reserves, while the unit joined the First Battalion, Junior Reserves, to form the 70th North Carolina Regiment (1st Junior Reserves). Likely named for Brig. Gen. Matthew W. Ransom.
Camp Vance Near Sulphur Springs (Buncombe County) Temporary duty station of the 29th North Carolina Regiment. Likely named in honor of Col. Zebulon B. Vance, the commander of the 26th North Carolina Regiment and later governor of North Carolina.
Camp Vance Berry's Mill Pond (6 miles from Morganton, Burke County) Training base for various regiments of Confederate Junior and Senior Reserves. Captured and destroyed in June 1864 by Col. George W. Kirk's 3rd North Carolina Mounted Infantry (Union).
Camp Vance Near Goldsboro (Wayne County) Temporary base of many Confederate units guarding rail and river approaches to Goldsboro.
Camp White Near Kinston (Lenoir County) Temporary base of the 7th North Carolina Regiment during the 1863 campaigns of Maj. Gen. Daniel H. Hill. Possibly named for Dr. W. E. White, the regiment's assistant surgeon.
Camp Whiting Near Wilmington (New Hanover County) Confederate camp that provided housing for recruits and troops stationed in batteries and forts defending Wilmington, the Cape Fear River, and Fort Fisher. Occupied by the 8th North Carolina Regiment, November--December 1862. Likely named for Maj. Gen. William H. C. Whiting.
Camp Winslow Near Wilmington (New Hanover County) Confederate camp that provided housing for recruits and troops stationed in batteries and forts defending Wilmington, the Cape Fear River, and Fort Fisher. Named for North Carolina governor Warren Winslow (died 1862).
Camp Woodfin Near Asheville (Buncombe County) First Confederate camp of instruction in western North Carolina. The 69th North Carolina Regiment, 8th Cavalry (Woodfin's Fourteenth Battalion) was raised here. Last camp in which the 64th North Carolina Regiment was stationed, April 1865. Named for John W. and Nicholas Woodfin, political and military leaders who donated the land.
Camp Wyatt South of Wilmington (New Hanover County) Temporary base of the 2nd North Carolina Regiment in the spring of 1862. Served as a hospital and supply point between Fort Fisher and Wilmington. Named for Pvt. Henry L. Wyatt of the 1st North Carolina (Bethel) Regiment, believed to have been the first Confederate soldier killed in action.

 

Comments

Comment: 

Looking for information on the training of the 34th Infantry CW inductees in High Point at Camp Fisher. Other resources show a Fort Fisher on the coast near Wilmington. Was there a Camp Fisher or not? And, if so, where was it in High Point?
RC

Comment: 

Dear Ron,

Thank you for visiting NCpedia.  By separate email, I'm connecting you with reference librarians at the Government & Heritage Library at the State Library of NC.  They will be able to assist you with locating resources that may help answer your question.

Good luck and best wishes!

Kelly Agan, Government & Heritage Library

Comment: 

you forgot about Camp Mast near Boone NC

Comment: 

Dear Joel,

Thanks for visiting NCpedia and taking the time to share this information.

We appreciate it greatly when readers can share information that helps us improve NCpedia’s content. If you have any sources that you can share with us for updating information, that would be very helpful for updating this entry.  If so, please feel free to post them back with this article.

Thanks very much and best wishes,

Kelly Agan, Government & Heritage Library

Comment: 

Camp Howard for the North Carolina 30th Infantry Regiment seems to be missing.

Comment: 

Camp Vance was between Valdese and Morganton NC. currently is on hwy 70 , the current camp is now Pleasant View Baptist church and private homes, the Marker is beside the Church. it is also site of Stonemans raid.. thanks Jeff Truitt Hickory NC

Add a comment

PLEASE NOTE: NCpedia will not publish personal contact information in comments, questions, or responses. Complete guidelines are available at http://ncpedia.org/comments.

Copyright notice

This article is from the Encyclopedia of North Carolina edited by William S. Powell. Copyright © 2006 by the University of North Carolina Press. Used by permission of the publisher. For personal use and not for further distribution. Please submit permission requests for other use directly to the publisher.

Grey Squirrel - Click me to return to the top of the page