North Carolina State Symbols and Other Official Adoptions

The North Carolina General Assembly adopted its first state symbol in 1885 with legislation recognizing the official State Flag. Since that time, the Legislature has adopted more symbols, from the State Dog to the State Marsupial to the State Beverage and the State Vegetable.  Some symbols are emblems or iconic representations of the state's history and culture, such as the flag or the Great Seal.  Others represent the state's unique natural heritage, such as the Cardinal and the Venus Fly Trap, or elements, like the sweet potato, that have been vital to sustaining the people or the economy. The adoption of each state symbol is associated with a particular piece of legislation enumerated in the North Carolina General Statutes, Chapter 145: State Symbols and Other Official Adoptions. Scroll down this page to access a list of the state's official adoptions (with links to NCpedia articles).
 
During the 2015-2016 legislative session two bills were introduced to designate official adoptions: for new official adotion. On January 26, 2015, a bill was introduced for the adoption of the Old Fort Gold Festival, in McDowell County, as the official Gold Festival of North Carolina.  The festival has been celebrated during the first weekend in June since 2003. And on March 4, 2015, a bill was introduced to name the Bobcat as the official State Cat. Fourth-graders at Benvenue Elementary School in Nash County wrote to their state legislator to recommend that the General Assembly adopt an official state cat to complement the state dog, the Plott Hound.  The legislation was sponsored by Rep. Bobbie Richardson, a Nash County Democrat. The General Assembly concluded the legislative session in 2015 without taking up either legislation for ratification.
 
During the 2016 session, the General Assembly voted to adopt the Town of Warsaw (Duplin County) Veterans Day Parade as the State Veterans Day Parade (S.B. 160). The bill was signed into law by the Governor of North Carolina on June 24, 2016.

 

State Symbols Timeline   Symbol of the Month  

North Carolina's State Symbols and Other Official Adoptions: Articles on State Symbols in NCpedia

Click on the blue text to access individual articles

Art Medium

Aviation Museums and Aviation Hall of Fame

Berries

Beverage

Bird

Boat

Butterfly

Carnivorous Plant

Christmas Tree

Colors

Community Theater

Dances

Dog

Festivals (and Blue Monday Shad Fry)

Flag

Folk Art

Flower

Fossil

Freshwater Trout

Frog

Fruit

Honor and Remember Flag

Horse

Insect

Irish Potato Festival

Mammal

Marsupial

Military Academy

Mineral

Motto

Pottery birthplace

Reptile

Rock

Salamander

Salt Water Fish

Salute, Flag

Seal

Shell

Song

Sport

Stone, Precious

Tartan

Toast

Tree

Vegetable

Veterans Day Parade, Town of Warsaw

Wildflower


North Carolina Legislation Authorizing State Symbols and Other Official Adoptions

NCpedia article listing state symbols and corresponding N.C. General Statutes (with links to statutes)

 

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Comments

Comment: 

hate this!!! i was looking for SC symbols
come ON!HATEHATEHATE

Comment: 

Sheesh! Calm down

Comment: 

Aw... do you really hate it? Or did you just want to leave a silly comment? ;)

I'm afraid SC symbols is outside the scope of the NCpedia. It is all about North Carolina.

You may wish to try a site about South Carolina, like http://www.sciway.net/hist/symbols.html or http://www.scstatehouse.gov/studentpage/coolstuff/symbols.shtml.

Good luck in your research!

Michelle Czaikowski, Government & Heritage Library

Comment: 

thanks for all the facts it really helped with my NC state project.

Yessss!

Comment: 

hey, i just came to say that i dislike this site and i do't ever want to come back on here againnnnnnnn! and alsssso, you guys neeeeddd too get BETTTTERR facccts forrrr classses likkke THISSS. smh =/ yall oughta' be ASHAMMMED!

Comment: 

why it is a good site for kids k12?

Comment: 

So sorry that you didn't find what you were looking for. If you provide us with more feedback -- what facts do you think are incorrect or what information do you feel is missing -- we might be able to better help you with your research.

Thanks for your input!
Amy

Comment: 

this site helped me with my project thx but what are some interesting facts about NC

Comment: 

So glad to hear it! 

And for interesting facts, you have tried the "Quick Facts" page? http://ncpedia.org/about/quickfacts

If that doesn't help, and there is a specific fact you are looking for, you may also contact Reference Services at the Government & Heritage Library at http://statelibrary.ncdcr.gov/contact.html. Or, call your local public library.

I hope this helps!

--Michelle Czaikowski, Digital Projects Manager, Government & Heritage Library

Comment: 

whaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaat?

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