Photograph of statue of the A&T Four (Greensboro Four) on the campus of North Carolina A&T University, Greensboro, N.C., by cewatkin, 2000 Wikimedia Commons.  Used with Creative Commons CC-BY-SA 3.0 license.Exploring North Carolina: The Civil Rights Movement

This page gathers resources in NCpedia that broadly cover the history and heritage of the Civil Rights Movement in North Carolina. It does not include all resources in NCpedia but rather a selection that covers important topics and events, including: background articles; events; politics and law; organizations and agencies; biographies; oral histories and personal accounts; and historic sites and monuments. These topics include many aspects of the movement for Civil Rights in North Carolina, including African American, Native American, and Women's history.

Background articles
Events
Environmental Justice Movement
Politics and Law
Organizations, Agencies and Meetings
Selected Biographies
Oral Histories and Personal Accounts
Historic Sites and Monuments
Educator Resources


Civil Rights Background articles

All NCpedia entries related to Civil Rights

African American Civil Rights in North Carolina
American Indians, Sovereignty
Basketball and Civil Rights
Cherokee: Federal recognition and fight for Cherokee Rights
Civil Rights Movement (multi-part article)
Civil Rigths Sits-Ins
Discrimination
Eugenics
Greensboro Four
Greensboro Sit-Ins
Labor Unions and Civil Rights Unionism
Lumbee Indians: Education, Civil Rights
Lynching
Segregation (article)
Segregation (all NCpedia articles relating to segregation)
Women (multi-part)
Women Earn the Right to Vote
Women Suffrage

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Civil Rights Events

Constitutional Convention, 1868: "Black Caucus"
Congress of Racial Equality
Death to the Klan March
Freedom Rallies: Williamston, N.C., 1963
Wilmington Race Riot
Royal Ice Cream Sit-In, 1957

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Civil Rights Politics and Law

Brown v. Board of Education
Charlotte Three
Convention of 1835
Disfranchisement
Election Law
Emcanicipation
Eugenics Board
Fourteenth Amendment
Pearsall Plan
Plessy v. Ferguson
Pupil Assignment Act
School Desegregation
Speaker Ban Law
State Constitution (all NCpedia articles)
State v. Manuel
First Women Marines

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Civil Rights Organizations, Agencies and Meetings

Black Panther Party
Committee for Economic and Racial Justice
Congress of Racial Equality
Equal Rights League
Freedmen's Conventions
NC Commission of Indian Affairs
North Carolina Equal Suffrage Association
Radio Free Dixie
Southern Christian Leadership Conference
Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee
White Citizens' Councils
Wilmington Ten

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Civil Rights Selected Biographies

Angelou, Maya
Baker, Ella
Brown, Charlotte Hawkins
Chestnutt, Charles Waddell
Cooper, Anna Julia Haywood
Frinks, Golden
Galloway, Abraham
Graham, Frank Porter
Green, Paul Eliot
Greensboro Four
Harris, James Henry
Holland, Anna Wealthy
Hyman, John Adams
Jones, John
Kester, Howard Anderson
Larkins, John Rodman
Lowe, Dazelle Foster
Mabley, Jackie
Manly, Alex
Mitchell, John W.
Murray, Anna Pauline (Pauli)
Perry, Samuel L.
Price, Joseph Charles
Ralston, Elreta Melton
Richardson, Willis
Riddick, Elsie Garnett
Scruggs, Lawson Andrew
Shepard, James Edward
Simone, Nina
Spaulding, Charles Clinton
Thorpe, Earlie Endris
Tourgee, Albion Winegar
Weil, Gertrude
Wheeler, John Hervey
Wiggins, Ella May
Wright, Marion Allen

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Civil Rights Oral Histories and Personal Accounts

Bethea-Shields, Karen: In Joan Little's Shell (Joan Little Murder Trial)
Cannady, Mary: At Dr. King's House
Forbes, David: The Birth of the SNCC (Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee)
Fleming, Karl: Show me Life
Grant, Gary: A Boy Scout Jamborree to Remember
Sanders, Bunny: Serpents and Doves

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Civil Rights: Selected Historic Sites and Monuments

Charlotte Hawkins Brown Museum
Durham's Black Wall Street
Greensboro Four Monument
First Light of Freedom Monument
Nina Simone Sculpture, Tryon
Palmer Memorial Institute
Roanoke Island Freedmen's Colony
Woolworth store, Greensboro (NCpedia articles relating to Sit-In Movement)

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Civil Rights Educator Resources:

Grade 8: Living History: Local Voices of the Civil Rights Movement. North Carolina Civic Education Consortium. http://civics.sites.unc.edu/files/2012/05/LivingHistoryLocalVoicesofCivi...

Grade 8: Journey of Reconciliation, 1947. North Carolina Civic Education Consortium. http://civics.sites.unc.edu/files/2012/05/JourneyofReconciliation1947.pdf

Grade 8: Remembering Martin Luther King, Jr.. North Carolina Civic Education Consortium. http://civics.sites.unc.edu/files/2012/05/RememberingMLK.pdf

Grade 8: Freedom Rides of 1961. North Carolina Civic Education Consortium. http://civics.sites.unc.edu/files/2012/04/FreedomRides.pdf

Grade 8: Greensboro Sit-Ins: A “Counter Revolution” in North Carolina. North Carolina Civic Education Consortium. https://database.civics.unc.edu/files/2012/04/GreensboroSitInsCounterRev...

Grade 8: The Twenty-Sixth Amendment & Youth Power. North Carolina Civic Education Consortium. http://database.civics.unc.edu/files/2012/05/TwentySixthAmendment2.pdf

Grade 8: Sitting Down To Stand Up For Democracy. North Carolina Civic Education Consortium. http://civics.sites.unc.edu/files/2012/04/SittingDownToStandUpForDemocra...

Grade 8: North Carolina Constitutional Convention of 1835. North Carolina Civic Education Consortium. http://civics.sites.unc.edu/files/2012/04/NCConstitutionalConvention1835...

Grade 8: Creating a Civil Rights Quilt. North Carolina Civic Education Consortium. http://civics.sites.unc.edu/files/2012/04/CivilRightsQuilt.pdf

Grade 8: Symbols and Words of Hate. North Carolina Civic Education Consortium. http://civics.sites.unc.edu/files/2012/04/SymbolsWordsHate.pdf

Grade 8: NC’s Lumbee Fight for Justice:The Battle at Hayes Pond in Maxton, NC. North Carolina Civic Education Consortium.

Grade 8: Poor Power: The North Carolina Fund & the Battle to End Poverty & Inequality in 1960s America. North Carolina Civic Education Consortium. http://civics.sites.unc.edu/files/2012/04/NCFund.pdf

Grade 8: African Americans in the United States Congress During Reconstruction. North Carolina Civic Education Consortium. https://database.civics.unc.edu/files/2012/09/AfricanAmericansUSCongress...

Grade 8: School Segregation. North Carolina Civic Education Consortium. http://civics.sites.unc.edu/files/2012/04/SchoolSegregation.pdf

Grade 8: Moments in the Lives of Engaged Citizens who Fought Jim Crow. North Carolina Civic Education Consortium.

Grade 8: North Carolina Constitution: An Introduction to NC’s State Constitution and Activities for Understanding It. North Carolina Civic Education Consortium. http://civics.sites.unc.edu/files/2012/04/NCConstitutionIntroductionActi...

Grade 8: Wilmington Race Riot of 1898. North Carolina Civic Education Consortium. http://database.civics.unc.edu/files/2012/04/WilmingtonRaceRiot8.pdf

Grade 8: Albion Tourgee and the Fight for Civil Rights. North Carolina Civics Education Consortium. http://civics.sites.unc.edu/files/2012/04/TourgeeFightforCivilRights.pdf

Grade 8: Exploring Life in 1898 Wilmington & the Wilmington Race Riot with Crow, a novel for young adults. North Carolina Civic Education Consortium. http://civics.sites.unc.edu/files/2013/05/1898Crow.pdf

Grade 8: Exploring Life in 1898 Wilmington & the Wilmington Race Riot with Crow, a novel for young adults. North Carolina Civic Education Consortium. http://civics.sites.unc.edu/files/2013/05/1898Crow.pdf

Grade 8: Nineteenth Amendment. North Carolina Civic Education Consortium. http://civics.sites.unc.edu/files/2012/05/NineteenthAmendment.pdf

Grade 8: The Twenty-Sixth Amendment & Youth Power. North Carolina Civic Education Consortium. http://database.civics.unc.edu/files/2012/05/TwentySixthAmendment2.pdf

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Image Credits:

Cewatkin. "Front view of the A&T Four Statue along with the Dudley Building in the background." Photograph. 2000. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/February_One#/media/File:A%26T_four_statue... (accessed April 5, 2016).

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