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Cameron Village Trend-Setter for Raleigh and the South

This Day in North Carolina History - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 00:00

On November 17, 1949, Cameron Village—one of the first shopping centers in the Southeast—opened in Raleigh. The shopping center was part of a larger, 158-acre planned development that also included single-family homes and several apartment buildings.

Some of the first shops to open in Cameron Village were Colonial Stores, the Village Restaurant, Roses 5-10-25¢ and PHR Cradle Shops. More than 65 stores—including a dry cleaner, shoe repair shop, butcher, beauty shop, two barber shops and a movie theater— and 112 professional offices were open at the complex within two years.

Cameron Village was enormously popular during the 1950s and 1960s, luring business away from downtown Raleigh, but it faced increasing competition from larger malls like Crabtree Valley in the late 1960s and early 1970s. In the 1970s, “The Underground,” a below-ground area with popular restaurants and nightclubs was completed, though it was short-lived with most establishments there closing during the 1980s.

The complex underwent major renovations in the 1990s and 2000s, and remains a popular Raleigh shopping destination to this day.

Click here to see more images of the Cameron Village Underground from the State Archives.

For more about North Carolina’s history, arts and culture, visit Cultural Resources online. To receive these updates automatically each day subscribe by email using the box on the right and follow us on FacebookTwitter and Pinterest.

Moravian Men from Pennsylvania Arrived in Forsyth County

This Day in North Carolina History - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 00:00

On November 17, 1753, fifteen Moravian men from Pennsylvania arrived in present-day Forsyth County on the land they called Wachovia. Bethabara, which means “House of Passage,” was the first community built in Wachovia.

In 1752, Moravians traveled south on the Great Wagon Road in search of a large tract of available land suitable for farming. They selected a 100,000-acre tract of land in the Piedmont region of North Carolina.

By the end of 1756, the settlers had built a church, gristmill, saw mill, tannery, pottery, distillery, and other crafts shops.  In 1766, the Moravians began building a town called Salem in the center of the Wachovia Tract. By 1772, most essential buildings had been built and industries transferred to the new town.

As Bethabara dwindled from a central town to farmland, it came to be called Old Town. Today visitors can visit Historic Bethabara Park to get a glimpse of what this early community looked like.

For more about North Carolina’s history, arts and culture, visit Cultural Resources online. To receive these updates automatically each day, make sure you subscribe by email using the box on the right, and follow us on FacebookTwitter and Pinterest.

Respected Pastel Artist Drew Upon Civil War Experience

This Day in North Carolina History - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 00:00

On November 17, 1862, 19-year-old James Wells Champney drafted a collection of small images titled “First impressions of North Carolina, sketched in cars on the [way] to newbern.”

The son of a painter-illustrator, Champney apprenticed in Boston to become a master wood engraver, but the outbreak of war interrupted his artistic training. He volunteered for the 45th Massachusetts and deployed to North Carolina in November 1862 as part of reinforcements for the Union occupational forces then at New Bern.

Like many artists-turned-soldiers, Champney used his artistic abilities to document his wartime experiences, depicting military installations, soldiers, African Americans, civilians and other scenes in and around New Bern. When he left the service after falling ill with malaria in July 1863, Champney had filled two sketchbooks, which are now held by the Outer Banks History Center.

After the war, Champney moved to Europe to study under renowned artist Pierre Édouard Frère. He returned to the United States an expert in pastels and established a studio in New York City where he worked for the remainder of his life. He died unexpectedly at the age of 59 after falling down an elevator shaft.

Visit: Champney’s sketches are featured in “Face to Face: Civil War Sketches and Stories,” an exhibit at Tryon Palace in New Bern that tells the story of the Union occupation of the area, and the Outer Banks History Center in Manteo, which holds the Champney sketches in its collection.

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Stamp Master’s Hand Forced, 1765

This Day in North Carolina History - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 00:00

On November 16, 1765, North Carolina’s stamp master, William Houston, resigned his post amid demonstrations against the Stamp Act. The Stamp Act of 1765, the first direct tax placed on the American colonies by Great Britain, was intended to raise revenue to defray Britain’s national debt. The measure, however, was met with great disdain throughout the colonies.

Houston, a Duplin County physician and early Irish immigrant, was selected as the stamp distributor in 1765 after Parliament passed the Act. His appointment led to public demonstrations and Houston being hanged in effigy in Wilmington, New Bern and Cross Creek throughout October 1765.

Upon arriving in Wilmington the following month to take his post, Houston was confronted by several hundred protestors. He publicly declared that he did not want to be responsible for government actions with which the public disagreed, but the unsatisfied crowd forced him to the county courthouse anyway, where he penned his resignation.

After his resignation, Houston evidently regained a level of respect. The following year, he became clerk of the Committee of Public Claims at New Bern, and later he was appointed a justice of the peace for Duplin County.

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Blue Ridge Parkway Project Approved

This Day in North Carolina History - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 00:00

On November 16, 1933, the Blue Ridge Parkway project received approval. The Blue Ridge Parkway, part of the National Park Service system, extends 469 miles through the Southern Appalachians, linking the Shenandoah National Park in northern Virginia with the Great Smoky Mountains National Park in North Carolina and Tennessee.

In 1934, Department of Interior Secretary Harold Ickes chose the final route through western North Carolina, rejecting one that would have gone through eastern Tennessee. His decision came after intensive lobbying from both states.

In September 1935, work began on a section extending southward from the North Carolina-Virginia line. Workers were secured from the unemployment rolls of Alleghany County as provided for in the Parkway legislation’s relief provisions.

The final section of the highway, including the Linn Cove Viaduct, was completed around Grandfather Mountain in 1987.

Designed for leisurely travel, the road is free of commercial development. From the outset attention has been given to preserving the natural beauty of the area and providing the traveler with uncluttered vistas. Each year, more than 22 million people travel the parkway. It has become an economic driver for western North Carolina.

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Federal Comptroller John Steele of Salisbury

This Day in North Carolina History - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 00:00

On November 16, 1764, early political leader John Steele was born in Salisbury.

After being educated near Statesville, Steele pursued several business ventures. His first political post was as tax assessor for the Salisbury area. He held several local offices in Rowan County and was sent to negotiate relations with Native American tribes before being elected to represent the area in the General Assembly in 1787.

Steele took park in both of North Carolina’s two federal constitutional conventions and served in Congress during its first two sessions. A staunch Federalist, he was an ally of Alexander Hamilton. After losing a vote in the General Assembly in a bid to become a U.S. senator, he returned to the state legislature and became active in the state militia.

President George Washington appointed Steele Comptroller of the Treasury in July 1796, a high-ranking job roughly equivalent to the Treasury Department’s general counsel today, and he remained in that post into the Jefferson administration.

Returning to North Carolina, Steele devoted his attention to managing his plantations and local politics in Rowan County. Before his death in 1815, Steele served in the General Assembly several more times, helped settle border disputes with both South Carolina and Georgia and was a trustee of UNC.

For more about North Carolina’s history, arts, nature and culture, visit DNCR online. To receive these updates automatically each day, make sure you subscribe by email using the box on the right, and follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Federal Writers Project Director Edwin Björkman

This Day in North Carolina History - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 00:00

On November 16, 1951, renowned writer, journalist and literary critic Edwin A. Björkman died in Asheville.

Born and raised in Sweden, Björkman worked as a clerk, journalist and actor before coming to the United States in 1891. Upon arrival, he briefly stopped in Chicago and then joined a Scandinavian colony in Minnesota, writing for newspapers to support himself. He later wrote for several papers in New York, served in the short-lived League of Nations’ news bureau and taught Scandinavian drama at Yale before moving to Waynesville in 1925.

In North Carolina, Björkman worked as the literary editor of the Asheville Times, and, during the Depression, directed the North Carolina Federal Writers Project of the Works Progress Administration. While working with that project he led the effort that produced North Carolina: A Guide to the Old North State.

Throughout his career, Björkman was a prolific writer, producing no less than 10 original novels and translating countless plays and other works into English from European languages. He married four times before dying at age 85, and he is buried in Asheville’s Riverside Cemetery.

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Charlotte Heist Foiled, 1933

This Day in North Carolina History - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 00:00

On November 15, 1933, noted criminal Roger “The Terrible” Touhy orchestrated a mail truck robbery in the heart of the Charlotte.

At the time of the robbery, Touhy was battling mobster Al Capone for control of illicit alcohol sales in Chicago. While awaiting trial for kidnapping, Touhy sent four men in his gang south to “raise” money for his defense. Although Charlotte had no connection to organized crime at the time, it was a burgeoning hub of the financial industry.

The theft took place in broad daylight. Members of Touhy’s gang ambushed the truck by driving out in front of it from an alleyway as it made its way down Third Street. The gang members got out of their car and moved toward the mail truck. At least one of the group brandished a machine gun as the others disarmed the driver. Two of Touhy’s gang easily clipped the lock on the truck with wire cutters, threw out the mail clerk they found inside and, within two minutes, stole about $100,000 in cash and bank notes.

Charlotte detective Frank Littlejohn conducted an extraordinary investigation and, within two weeks of the heist, three suspects were in jail and the fourth was dead in an apparent mob knockoff.

For more about North Carolina’s history, arts and culture, visit Cultural Resources online. To receive these updates automatically each day, make sure you subscribe by email using the box on the right, and follow us on FacebookTwitter and Pinterest.

Fear Runs Rampant in Henderson, 1958-1959

This Day in North Carolina History - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 00:00

On November 15, 1958, the Textile Workers Union of America called a strike at the Harriet-Henderson Mills in Henderson. The union had targeted cotton mills across the state since 1946 as part of “Operation Dixie.” By 1958, more than a thousand local workers had enrolled in the union, accounting for one in seven of all union members in the state.

A wave of violence swept across Henderson in 1959 after negotiations between the mill owner and the union broke down. Windows were shot out at mill headquarters. Strikers pulled a truck driver from his cab. Organizer Boyd Payton was injured when rocks were thrown at his car. Dynamite blasts damaged a strikebreaker’s house and a boiler room. Gov. Luther Hodges assigned 150 Highway Patrolmen and several National Guard units to the scene.

Payton and seven others were indicted, convicted, and sentenced to six to 10 years in pirson. The judge declared, “Fear has run rampant in Henderson and Vance County. It must end right here.” The company returned to a full work force but organizers did not formally call off the strike until June 1961. In that year Gov. Terry Sanford the shortened sentences for and later granted clemency to Payton and others.  

Read more in The Textile Industry in North Carolina: A History from N.C. Historical Publications.

For more about North Carolina’s history, arts and culture, visit Cultural Resources online. To receive these updates automatically each day subscribe by email using the box on the right and follow us on FacebookTwitter and Pinterest.

Movie Silent About Fate of Colonists

This Day in North Carolina History - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 00:00

On November 15, 1921, Governor Cameron Morrison and a host of other state dignitaries gathered in Raleigh for the debut of the silent movie about the Lost Colony called “The Earliest English Expeditions and Attempted Settlements in the Territory of What Is Now the United States, 1584-1591.”

Conceived as an educational tool, the film was produced on the Outer Banks and starred Dare County residents as Indians and English settlers.

Mabel Evans Jones, then the superintendent of the Dare County Schools, came up with the idea for the film, and was featured in it as Eleanor White Dare – the mother of the first documented English child born in the New World, Virginia Dare. Dr. William Horton of Raleigh portrayed John White, Eleanor’s father. The clergyman who baptized Virginia Dare was the Rev. R.B. Drane, the long-time rector of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Edenton.

The 46-minute, five-reel movie toured the state. It was the first silent movie produced in the state, and at the height of its popularity it was part of North Carolina’s official history curriculum for public schools.

Paul Green’s 1937 outdoor drama “The Lost Colony” was inspired in part by Jones’s film. For several decades the film was lost, but in 2011 a copy was discovered and digitized.

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Peter Stuart Ney Confesses to be Napoleon’s Closest Aide

This Day in North Carolina History - Tue, 11/21/2017 - 00:00

On November 15, 1846, Peter Stuart Ney, a teacher from Rowan County, is said to have made a deathbed confession that he was, in fact, Napoleon Bonaparte’s most trusted commander, Marshal Michel Ney. Marshal Ney was rumored to have escaped execution in 1815 and fled to America.

The story of Peter Stuart Ney first appeared in 1856 in a widely distributed article written by one of Ney’s students.  The teacher is said to have denied the rumors except when intoxicated but made a full confession on his deathbed, “I will not die with a lie on my lips, I am Marshal Ney of France.”  However, researcher William Henry Hoyt amassed conclusive evidence that the true Marshal Ney did not escape the firing squad.  He also found an 1820 application for citizenship filed by Peter Stuart Ney in South Carolina and a record of his baptism in Scotland.

Despite this counterevidence, the grave of Peter Stuart Ney at Third Creek Presbyterian Church in the town of Cleveland reads: “In memory of Peter Stuart Ney/ A native of France and soldier of the French Revolution under Napoleon Bonaparte/ Who departed this life November 15th, 1846/ Aged 77 years.”

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An Advocate for Cities: The N.C. League of Municipalities

This Day in North Carolina History - Fri, 11/17/2017 - 00:00

On November 17, 1908, local officials from across North Carolina met in Charlotte to discuss their experiences in city and town management. Governor Robert Glenn joined them, as did the mayors of Boston, Houston and Roanoke, Va.

Gathered in the 500-seat auditorium of the Charlotte Academy of Music building, those present voted to form the Carolina Municipal Association, for the “advancement of good civic management in all municipalities.”

Twenty-two North Carolina cities enrolled as founding members of the group. The association has met annually since, and it changed its name to the North Carolina League of Municipalities (NCLM) in 1934. Today, the Raleigh-based League represents over 530 Tar Heel cities and towns.

The organization’s accomplishments include advocacy that has led to zoning regulations and group insurance for municipal employees. In 1951, the NCLM led an effort to provide for a percentage of the state gasoline tax revenues to be passed to local governments for road development and improvement.

More recently it advocated successfully for the local option sales tax and for the return of historic preservation tax credits.

For more about North Carolina’s history, arts, nature and culture, visit DNCR online. To receive these updates automatically each day, make sure you subscribe by email using the box on the right, and follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Andy Griffith’s “What It Was, Was Football” Recorded

This Day in North Carolina History - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 00:00

On November 14, 1953 ,the Colonial label in Raleigh, N.C. released  Andy Griffith’s monologue “What It Was, Was Football.”  Colonial was owned by Chapel Hill newspaper publisher Orville B. Campbell, who had heard Griffith perform the comedy bit at a luncheon earlier that year.

The narrator of the story is a young man who happens upon a football game – something he had never experienced before.  His retelling of the game included a description of the football, “It was that both bunches full of them wanted this funny looking little pumpkin to play with. They did. And I know, friends, that they couldn’t eat it because they kicked it the whole evening and it never busted.”

“What it Was, Was Football” helped launch Griffith’s career, which ultimately took him from North Carolina to Broadway. He went on to star in movies and television shows, and to become a Grammy Award-winning singer. After many years in front of the camera, Griffith returned to North Carolina, and settled in Manteo, where he remained until his death on July 3, 2012.

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Mystery of the Dare Stones

This Day in North Carolina History - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 00:00

On November 14, 1937, a team of Emory University professors revealed the transcription of a message carved on a rock discovered by Louis Hammond in Chowan County earlier that year. The text of their transcription reads:

[Side 1]

Ananias Dare &
Virginia Went Hence
Unto Heaven 1591
Anye Englishman Shew
John White Govr Via.

[Side 2]

Father Soone After You
Goe for England Wee Cam
Hither / Onlie Misarie & Warre
Tow Yeere / Above Halfe Deade ere Tow
Yeere More From Sickenes Beine Foure & Twentie /
Salvage with Message of Shipp Unto Us / Smal
Space of Time they Affrite of Revenge Rann
Al Awaye / Wee Bleeve it Nott You / Soone After
Ye Salvages Faine Spirits Angrie / Suddaine
Murther Al Save Seaven / Mine Childe /
Ananais to Slaine wth Much Misarie /
Burie Al Neere Foure Myles Easte This River
Uppon Small Hil / Names Writ Al Ther
On Rocke / Putt This Ther Alsoe / Salvage
Shew This Unto You & Hither Wee
Promise You to Give Greate
Plentie Presents
EWD

The message on what came to be known as the “Dare Stone” appeared to be Eleanor White Dare’s recounting of the fate of the Lost Colony from almost 350 years earlier. The Dare Stone’s authenticity is still debated, but the most recent study of the stone done by David LaVere at UNC-Wilmington leaned toward confirming its veracity.

Not long after Hammond turned the stone over to scholars, he disappeared. Later efforts to find him or information about him proved fruitless. Since a number of events related to the Lost Colony, including the debut of a new outdoor drama by Paul Green, were underway to commemorate the 350th anniversary of the English attempt to establish a permanent colony in the New World at that time, some believed the stone to be a promotional stunt.

Complicating the authenticity questions were a number of other “Dare Stone” discoveries in scattered locations. These came to light after the public offer of a reward for such stones. All but the original are universally deemed to be forgeries.

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Senator and Jurist A.S. Merrimon

This Day in North Carolina History - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 00:00

On November 14, 1892, U.S. Senator and Chief Justice of North Carolina A.S. Merrimon died. Born in 1830 in Transylvania County, Merrimon studied law alongside Zebulon B. Vance in Asheville. Before the Civil War, he held a variety of public offices in Asheville, serving as a solicitor for Buncombe County and in the legislature in 1860 and 1861.

Though an opponent of secession, Merrimon enlisted in the Confederate Army at the outset of the Civil War. Soon after, he was appointed solicitor for the Eighth Confederate Congressional district. For the remainder of the war, he used that position to try to quell violence in the western part of the state between pro-Confederate and Unionist factions.

A prominent lawyer throughout the late 1860s and early 1870s, Merrimon ran unsuccessfully for governor in 1872, but was elected to the U.S. Senate the following year. While in the Senate he spoke against a civil rights bill and attacked Republicans and their causes in general. He returned to private practice after one term until Governor Thomas J. Jarvis appointed him to the state supreme court. He was elevated to chief justice six years later.

He died in November 1892 and is buried in Oakwood Cemetery in Raleigh.

For more about North Carolina’s history, arts and culture, visit Cultural Resources online. To receive these updates automatically each day subscribe by email using the box on the right and follow us on FacebookTwitter and Pinterest.

Eastern North Carolina Artist Francis Speight

This Day in North Carolina History - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 00:00

On November 13, 1989, award-winning artist Francis Speight died at age 93 in his Greenville home.

Speight grew up on a Bertie County plantation before enrolling in college at Wake Forest. While there he took art lessons at Meredith College. After briefly serving in the Army during World War I, Speight studied and taught at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, where he would remain for more than 40 years.

Speight focused on painting rural and suburban landscapes and, though some of his work was inspired by his adopted Pennsylvania, he continued to use the landscapes of his native eastern North Carolina as a muse as well.

In 1961, Speight moved back to North Carolina where he taught as an artist-in-residence at East Carolina until his retirement in 1976.

Speight’s work remains on display in public and private art collections across the country. He was the first North Carolina artist to be honored with an exhibition of his works in the newly opened N.C. Museum of Art in Raleigh. His many accolades include the North Carolina Award and memberships in the National Academy of Design and the American Institute of Arts and Letters.

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Gambling Comes to Cherokee

This Day in North Carolina History - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 00:00

On November 13, 1997, Harrah’s Cherokee Casino—the first casino in North Carolina—opened in Cherokee on the reservation of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians (EBCI). Owned by the EBCI and operated by Caesars Entertainment Corporation, the casino complex recently expanded and now offers live table games, slot machines and traditional video gaming machines, as well as a spa. Its amenities also include a 21-story hotel, conference center, events center and several restaurants.

When Harrah’s Cherokee first opened, it offered only video poker. In August 2012, the U.S. Department of the Interior approved an amended agreement between North Carolina and the EBCI allowing live dealers. That agreement earmarked the state’s share of gaming revenues for public education while most of the remaining monies were to be distributed annually among tribal members.

Because of the new jobs and local economic upswing created by Harrah’s Cherokee, the Eastern Band has been able to make major improvements in health care, housing, education and public safety on its reservation. In September 2015 tribal officials opened the Harrah’s Cherokee Valley River Casino & Hotel in Murphy.

For more, check out Native Carolinians: The Indians of North Carolina from N.C. Historical Publications.

For more about North Carolina’s history, arts and culture, visit Cultural Resources online. To receive these updates automatically each day subscribe by email using the box on the right and follow us on FacebookTwitter and Pinterest.

Four Claims about North Carolinians and the Civil War

This Day in North Carolina History - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 00:00

On November 12, 1903, the North Carolina Literary and Historical Association appointed a committee to settle scores remaining from the Civil War. The following spring the group received the committee’s report, boasting “First at Bethel, Farthest at Gettysburg, Farthest at Chickamauga, and Last at Appomattox.” The claims had been emblazoned upon the Confederate monument erected at the Capitol in 1895, and stamped upon the covers of the regimental histories collected in 1901, popularly known as “Clark’s Regiments.”

Just as Gov. Charles B. Aycock sought to redeem the state from a legacy of ignorance, the members of the association sought to raise the cultural awareness of citizens. Early leaders made it their task to “correct printed misrepresentations about the state.” J. Bryan Grimes, who took office as Secretary of State when Aycock was governor, persuaded the Literary and Historical Association to answer perceived slights.

North Carolinians were particularly irked by and contentious about competing claims made by Virginians.  A 90-page publication on the topic, with documentation and first-hand accounts, appeared in 1907 under the auspices of the North Carolina Historical Commission.

Though the group endorsed all four claims, we know now that they aren’t easily provable.

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P. T. Barnum Begins to Organize Circus

This Day in North Carolina History - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 00:00

On November 12, 1836, Phineas Taylor “P. T.” Barnum arrived in Rocky Mount after leaving Aaron Turner’s Traveling Circus, for whom he managed the side show acts and took tickets.  Barnum convinced some of the Turner acts to join his own traveling circus.

Their first stop was in Rocky Mount Falls (now Rocky Mount).  Arriving on a Saturday evening, Barnum spent the night at the Stage Coach Inn. In his autobiography, Barnum wrote that, the next morning, he accompanied the landlord to the Baptist church.

Before entering the church, Barnum noticed a grove with a stand and benches. Desiring to speak to the congregation, Barnum was permitted by the preacher to speak for a half an hour after the service.

Approximately 300 people stayed to listen to Barnum preach. While not yet known as the Greatest Showman on Earth— it is reported that the crowd was certainly pleased with his performance.

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State’s Confederate Vets Defend Their Honor, 1904

This Day in North Carolina History - Tue, 11/14/2017 - 00:00

On November 12, 1903, the North Carolina Literary and Historical Association appointed a committee to investigate and report on the various claims made about North Carolina’s involvement in the Civil War.

The following spring the group received the committee’s report, boasting that North Carolinians indeed had been “First at Bethel, Farthest at Gettysburg, Farthest at Chickamauga, and Last at Appomattox,” as a popular saying coined by editor and state Supreme County Justice Walter Clark suggested.

Specifically, the saying refers to claims that:

  • The First North Carolina Volunteers were instrumental at the Battle of Bethel in Virginia, and that Henry Lawson Wyatt from Edgecombe County was the first solider to die in a major Civil War conflict,
  • North Carolina soldiers advanced the greatest distance during Pickett’s Charge at the Battle of Gettysburg,
  • The 58th North Carolina Troops advanced far behind enemy lines at the Battle of Chickamauga and
  • Company D of the 30th North Carolina Troops fired the last shots at Appomattox before Lee’s April 1865 surrender

Just as Gov. Charles B. Aycock sought to redeem the state from a legacy of ignorance, the members of the association sought to raise the cultural awareness of citizens. Early leaders made it their task to “correct printed misrepresentations about the state.” J. Bryan Grimes, who took office as Secretary of State when Aycock was governor, persuaded the Literary and Historical Association to answer perceived slights.

The specific claims the report sought to prove were intended to counter competing claims made by Virginians. A substantial publication on the topic, with documentation and first-hand accounts, appeared in 1904 under the auspices of the North Carolina Historical Commission.

Though the group endorsed all four claims, we know now that they aren’t easily provable.

The full report is available online through the State Library’s State Publications Digital Collection.

For more about North Carolina’s history, arts, nature and culture, visit DNCR online. To receive these updates automatically each day, make sure you subscribe by email using the box on the right, and follow us on Facebook and Twitter.