Cherokee Indians

Cherokee Indians
American Indian Storytelling
by Currie, Jefferson. "Shhhhhhhh!" Legend has it that Coharie Indian mothers would make that sound when outsiders would approach their village, hoping to quiet their children until the strangers passed. The Coharie were [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
American Indians in Antebellum NC
by Nathans, Sydney. American Indians in Antebellum NC Originally published as "A Class All Their Own: American Indians in Antebellum North Carolina" by Sydney Nathans Reprinted with permission from the Tar Heel [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
American Indians in WWII
by La Vere, David. North Carolina’s American Indians in World War II by Dr. David La Vere/Our State Books Reprinted with permission from the Tar Heel Junior Historian. Fall 2005. Tar Heel Junior Historian [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Attakullakulla
by Corkran, D. H. Attakullakulla, a Cherokee warrior and statesman—known to the English as The Little Carpenter, because his name meant "wood leaning up" and therefore suggested house-building—became the most [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Cherokee Botanical Garden
by Williams, Wiley J. The Cherokee Botanical Garden, first opened to the public in May 1953, adjoins Oconaluftee Indian Village on the Cherokee Indian Reservation (Qualla Boundary) in western North Carolina. The garden is [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Cherokee Indians - Part 1: Overview
by Anderson, William L., Wetmore, Ruth Y., Bell, John L. Part i: Overview; Part ii: Cherokee origins and first European contact; Part iii: Disease, destruction, and the loss of Cherokee land; Part iv: Revolutionary War, Cherokee defeat and additional land [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Cherokee Indians - Part 2: Cherokee origins and first European contact
by Anderson, William L., Wetmore, Ruth Y. Part i:Overview; Part ii: Cherokee origins and first European contact; Part iii: Disease, destruction, and the loss of Cherokee land; Part iv: Revolutionary War, Cherokee defeat and additional land [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Cherokee Indians - Part 3: Disease, destruction, and the loss of Cherokee land
by Anderson, William L., Wetmore, Ruth Y. Part i: Overview; Part ii: Cherokee origins and first European contact; Part iii: Disease, destruction, and the loss of Cherokee land; Part iv: Revolutionary War, Cherokee defeat and additional land [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Cherokee Indians - Part 4: Revolutionary War, Cherokee defeat and additional land cessions
by Anderson, William L., Wetmore, Ruth Y. Part i: Overview; Part ii: Cherokee origins and first European contact; Part iii: Disease, destruction, and the loss of Cherokee land; Part iv: Revolutionary War, Cherokee defeat and additional land [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Cherokee Indians - Part 5: Trail of Tears and the creation of the Eastern Band of Cherokees
by Anderson, William L., Wetmore, Ruth Y. Part i: Overview; Part ii: Cherokee origins and first European contact; Part iii: Disease, destruction, and the loss of Cherokee land; Part iv: Revolutionary War, Cherokee defeat and additional land [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Cherokee Indians - Part 6: Federal recognition and the fight for Cherokee rights
by Anderson, William L., Wetmore, Ruth Y. Part i: Overview; Part ii: Cherokee origins and first European contact; Part iii: Disease, destruction, and the loss of Cherokee land; Part iv: Revolutionary War, Cherokee defeat and additional land [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Cherokee Indians - Part 7: Modern-day Cherokee life and culture
by Anderson, William L., Wetmore, Ruth Y. Part i: Overview; Part ii: Cherokee origins and first European contact; Part iii: Disease, destruction, and the loss of Cherokee land; Part iv: Revolutionary War, Cherokee defeat and additional land [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Cherokee Indians - Part 8: References and additional resources
by Anderson, William L., Wetmore, Ruth Y. Part i: Overview; Part ii: Cherokee origins and first European contact; Part iii: Disease, destruction, and the loss of Cherokee land; Part iv: Revolutionary War, Cherokee defeat and additional land [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Cherokee language
by Frey, Ben. Cherokee is very different from European lanugages. Many European languages—French, Spanish, and Italian, for example—relate in some way to each other, Cherokee has no basic relationship to these [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Connecorte (Old Hop)
by Corkran, D. H. Connecorte (Old Hop), the First Man or Ulustuli of Overhill Chota and therefore of the Cherokee nation, was sometimes referred to as the "Fire King" but was called "Old Hop" by the traders because of [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Deep Creek, Battle of
by Anderson, William L. the battle of deep creek, also called the battle of quallatown, was a civil war engagement that occurred on 2 feb. 1864. union troops from the 14th illinois cavalry under maj. francis m. davidson [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
English Dialects
by Porter, Matthew C. The English language in North Carolina has been growing and evolving since 1584, when the first English explorers to visit North America came to the Outer Banks, making it the first place in the New [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Etchoe, Battle of
by Anderson, William L. The Battle of Etchoe took place during the Cherokee War of 1760-61 between the Cherokee and the English. That war, a subconflict within the French and Indian War, began when whites murdered a number [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Exploring North Carolina: Native American History
by Agan, Kelly. Exploring North Carolina: American Indian History This page gathers resources in NCpedia that broadly cover the [...] (from Government & Heritage Library, State Library of North Carolina.)
French and Indian War
by Branch, Paul, Marshall, R. Jackson, III. French and Indian War (1754-63) grew out of competition between Great Britain and France for land in North America. As part of the larger Seven Years War in Europe, colonists and Indians were caught [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Gloyne, Lula Owl
by . Originally published in Courageous Care:  African American and Cherokee Nurses in Appalachia 1900-1965. Republished with permission. For personal educational use and not for further distribution. [...] (from Appalachian State University.)
Inventors, North Carolina
by Davis, Lenwood. Many people are unaware of the numerous inventions and scientific breakthroughs that have happened in North Carolina. They probably have heard of Wilbur and Orville Wright and the first sustained, [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Judaculla Rock
by Anderson, William L. Judaculla Rock, associated with the Cherokee legend of Tsu'kalu, is a large soapstone rock covered with petroglyphs located on Caney Fork Creek off N.C. 107 in Jackson County. According to legend, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Junaluska
by McKinney, Gordon B. Junaluska, Cherokee warrior and hero of Andrew Jackson's victory over the Creeks at Horseshoe Bend in 1814, was born near the head of the Little Tennessee River in either Macon County, N.C., or Rabun [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Museum of the Cherokee Indian
by Anderson, William L. The Museum of the Cherokee Indian, established in 1948, was originally housed in a log building on the Qualla Boundary of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. The initial collection of the museum [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Native American Settlement of NC
by Claggett, Stephen R. First Immigrants: Native American Settlement of North Carolina by Stephen R. Claggett Reprinted with permission from the Tar Heel Junior Historian. Spring 1995. Tar Heel Junior Historian [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Oconaluftee Indian Village
by Holland, Ron. On 16 Aug. 1950 the board of trustees of the Cherokee Historical Association in Cherokee-sponsor of the popular outdoor drama Unto These Hills-approved the idea of constructing a replica of an [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Osteneco (Judd's Friend)
by Corkran, D. H. Osteneco (Judd's Friend), the second warrior of the Overhill Cherokee and a member of the Wolf Clan, was known to the colonials as Judd's Friend (sometimes Judge's Friend) because early in his career [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Qualla Boundary
by Hill, Michael. The Qualla Boundary, the official name for the Cherokee Indian Reservation in western North Carolina, was officially surveyed and its present boundaries were established in 1876. The tract owed its [...] (from Research Branch, NC Office of Archives and History.)
Queen, Joel
by Hall, Lisa Coston. When most people look at a lump of clay or a piece of walnut, they see just that—a simple, unmoving object. Joel Queen, though, looks at such raw material and sees something waiting to be turned into [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Ramps
by Tetterton, Beverly. Ramps (Allium tricoccum) are wild leeks or onions found in eastern North America. They grow wild high in the Great Smoky Mountains. Related to the ramson, a kind of garlic with broad leaves, the ramp [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Ross, John
by Powell, William S. John Ross, friend and leader of the Cherokee Indians, was born in Cherokee country near Lookout Mountain in an area that was relinquished by North Carolina to the federal government in the same year. [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Sequoyah
by Folmsbee, Stanley J. Sequoyah by Stanley J. Folmsbee 1770?-August 1843 Sequoyah, inventor of Cherokee syllabary, was born in the Indian town of Taskigi, Tenn., then western North Carolina. His father probably was [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Settlement of the Mountains, 1775-1838 (from Tar Heel Junior Historian)
by Holland, Ron. Settlement of the Mountains, 1775-1838 "North Carolina's Final Frontier" Related Entries: Cherokee Indians; Asheville; Regions by Ron Holland Reprinted with permission from the Tar Heel [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Shinn, Terry: High Rock
by Cecelski, David S. One night last summer, Terry Shinn visited my family's campsite next to the French Broad River, in the Blue Ridge Mountains. The tall, soft-spoken stranger lived just up a short path, in the faded [...] (from Listening to History, News and Observer.)
Siler, Jacob
by Sloan-Farmer, Maryann. Jacob Siler, western North Carolina pioneer, state legislator, and Cherokee Indian agent, was born in South Carolina's Pendleton district, of German and Irish ancestry. His grandfather, Plikard [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Smith, Nimrod Jarrett
by Perdue, Theda. Nimrod Jarrett Smith, principal chief of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians from 1880 to 1891, was born near Murphy. His mother was Cherokee and his father was a white man who acted as translator [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Smith, Nimrod Jarrett
by Wegner, Ansley Herring. Nimrod Jarrett Smith 1837 - 1893 by Ansley Wegner Research Branch, NC Office of Archives and [...] (from Research Branch, NC Office of Archives and History.)
Stickball
by Anderson, William L., Battle, Charles. Stickball by William L. Anderson, 2006 Additional research provided by Charles Battle. See also: Cherokee Indians Stickball, a Native American game similar to lacrosse and called [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Stoga, John Astooga
by Powell, William S. Stoga, John Astooga by William S. Powell, 1994 d. 15 Sept. 1862 John Astooga Stoga, popular Cherokee [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Swimmer
by Powell, William S. Swimmer by William S. Powell ca. 1835–March 1899 Swimmer, Cherokee traditionalist and storyteller, was born in the Cherokee country of southwestern North Carolina. His Cherokee name, [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
The Forest and the Indians
by Parramore, Thomas C., Watson, Harry L., Nathans, Sydney, Anderson, Jean Bradley, Clayton, Thomas H., Fenn, Elizabeth A., Wood, Peter H. By Elizabeth A. Fenn, Peter H. Wood, Harry L. Watson, Thomas H. Clayton, Sydney Nathans, Thomas C. Parramore, and Jean B. Anderson; Maps by Mark Anderson Moore. Edited by Joe A. Mobley. [...] (from The Way We Lived in North Carolina, NC Office of Archives and History and UNC Press.)
Thomas's Legion
by Anderson, William L. Thomas's Legion was formed during the Civil War by William Holland Thomas, the only white man ever to become chief of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians. Believing that North Carolinians would not [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Thomas, William Holland
by McKinney, Gordon B. William Holland Thomas, white chief of the Eastern Band of the Cherokee Indians, legislator, and Confederate officer, was born in rural Haywood County shortly after the death of his father, Richard [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Tsali (Charley)
by Finger, John R. Tsali (Charley), a full-blooded Cherokee farmer, resided with his family near the mouth of the Nantahala River in western North Carolina at the time of the 1835 Cherokee census. Apparently of middle [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Usteneka
by Trotman, Mary Nelle. Usteneka, Cherokee leader, is referred to in some sources as Ostenaco, Autositty, Ustonekka, Outacite, Outacity, and Judd's Friend. There seems to be no substantial agreement among sources as to [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Walkingstick, Ernestine
by Pollitt, Phoebe Ann. Excerpted from "North Carolina Nursing History" and "Courageous Care: African American and Cherokee Nurses in Appalachia 1900-1965." Republished with permission. For personal educational use and not [...] (from Appalachian State University.)
Ward, Nancy (from Tar Heel Junior Historian)
by Wilson, Emily Herring. Children born to Cherokee parents in what is now North Carolina before the Cherokee had any contact with European settlers would have been a members of their mother’s clan. Property belonged to the [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Warriors of AniKituhwa
by Duncan, Barbara Reimensnyder. A powerful cry echoes from the mountains: “Whoooooo hooo!” A group of Cherokee men answers even louder: “Whoooooo hooo!” The cry from the mountains echoes back. Seven men walk out, covered in red [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Watauga Settlement
by Cockrell, David L. The Watauga Settlement was the first community established in North Carolina's western frontier and holds the distinction of being perhaps the first American settlement west of the Appalachian [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Yonaguska (or Drowning Bear)
by Perdue, Theda. Yonaguska (or Drowning Bear), was head chief of the Cherokee middle towns in the crucial years from 1800 until his death. The exact date and place of his birth are unknown, but Charles Lanman, who [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
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