Court cases

Court cases
Ballad of Tom Dooley
by Mitchell, Thornton W. Thomas C. Dula was born in Wilkes County on 20 June 1844, the son of Mary Dula. In 1862 he enlisted in the 42nd Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, as a private. Dula was captured at Kinston and was a [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Bayard v. Singleton
by Hollins, Andy. Bayard v. Singleton was possibly the first legal decision in the United States in which a court nullified a law because it was found to be unconstitutional. During the American Revolution the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
BAYARD v. SINGLETON
by . Bayard v. Singleton, a landmark North Carolina court case that set a precedent for the exercise of judicial review, was decided in New Bern in November 1787. In that year, Elizabeth Cornell Bayard [...] (from Research Branch, NC Office of Archives and History.)
Charlotte Three
by Powell, William S. Charlotte Three by William S. Powell, 2006 "Charlotte Three" was the term applied by journalists in the 1970s to James Grant, T. J. Reddy, and Charles Parker, African American civil rights [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Dula, Thomas C. ("Tom Dooley")
by Mitchell, Thornton W. Dula, Thomas C. ("Tom Dooley") by Thornton W. Mitchell, 1986 See also: Ballad of Tom Dooley; Folk Music- Part 1: Introduction 20 June 1844–1 May 1868 Thomas C. ("Tom Dooley") Dula, [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Flake, Nancy
by Stumpf, Vernon O. Nancy Flake, radio entertainer with the Columbia Broadcasting System and WABC in New York City and a vocalist with the big bands of Charlie Barnett, Al Kavelin, and Frank Dailey, was the central [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Fortuna
by Fish, Peter Graham. The Fortuna case, decided by U.S. Supreme Court chief justice John Marshall in the U.S. Circuit Court for the District of North Carolina on an appeal from Judge Henry Potter's district court, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Granville's Devisee v. Allen
by Fish, Peter Graham. In 1805 U.S. Supreme Court chief justice John Marshall and district judge Henry Potter, sitting in the U.S. Circuit Court for the District of North Carolina, considered the claim to the Earl [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Hoke v. Henderson
by Orth, John V. Hoke v. Henderson, a case decided by the North Carolina Supreme Court in 1834 in an opinion by Chief Justice Thomas Ruffin, held that state offices were a form of property, and that officeholders [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Latimer v. Poteat
by Fish, Peter Graham. The case of Lessees of Margaret Latimer & Others v. William Poteat was heard by Supreme Court chief justice John Marshall and district judge Henry Potter at the May 1833 term of the U.S. Circuit [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
McNeill, John Charles
by Walser, Richard. John Charles McNeill, poet, journalist, and lawyer, was born at Ellerslie, his father's farm near Wagram in Richmond (later Scotland) County. His two grandfathers had emigrated from Argyllshire, [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Mooning
by Powell, William S. Mooning means to expose the bare buttocks as a challenge or a taunt. Although it was undoubtedly used previously in some settings, the word first came to national attention after it appeared in a [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Ogden v. Witherspoon (Blackledge)
by Fish, Peter Graham. Ogden v. Witherspoon (Blackledge) was heard before circuit justice John Marshall and resident district judge Henry Potter in 1802. The judges sharply disagreed about the meaning of several [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Plessy v. Ferguson
by Roundtree, Lynn. Plessy v. Ferguson by Lynn Roundtree, 2006 In 1896 the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the so-called separate-but-equal segregation of whites and blacks in public facilities in its decision on [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Pupil Assignment Act
by Campbell, Karl E. The Pupil Assignment Act was North Carolina's first and most effective legislative response to the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in Brown v. Board of Education. On 17 May 1954 the Court declared that [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Royal Ice Cream Sit-In
by Daniels, Dennis F. The 1960 Greensboro sit-ins sparked a national movement but were not the first such action. Individual and group protest actions prior to 1960, generally isolated and often without wider impact, took [...] (from Research Branch, NC Office of Archives and History.)
Sarah Keys:  Staying Seated to Stand Up for Her Rights
by Agan, Kelly. Take a minute to imagine that you couldn’t sit where you wanted to on a bus because of the color of your skin or where you came from. How would that make you feel? What would you do? This article is [...] (from NCpedia K-8 Collection.)
Silver, Frances "Frankie" (from Tar Heel Junior Historian)
by McCall, Maxine. When Charlie disappeared on December 22, 1831, heavy snow was falling. Did he slip through the ice on the frozen river? Was he wounded or killed by a bear or a mountain lion? Friends and neighbors [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Simkins v. Cone
by Thomas, Karen Kruse. In 1962 dentist George Simkins, physician Alvin Blount, and other African American physicians and their patients sued Moses H. Cone Memorial Hospital and Wesley Long Community Hospital in Greensboro, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
South Dakota v. North Carolina
by Hunt, James L. The author of the lawsuit was Daniel L. Russell Jr., Republican governor of the state from 1897 to 1901. Russell conceived the plan in 1900, while his party was collapsing from the onslaught of white [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
State v. Manuel
by Stoesen, Alexander R. State v. Manuel by Alexander R. Stoesen, 2006 State v. Manuel, argued before the North Carolina Supreme Court in 1838, was the first case to decide that a free black person was a citizen of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
State v. Worth
by Stoesen, Alexander R. State v. Worth by Alexander R. Stoesen, 2006 See also: Daniel Worth (Dictionary of North Carolina Biography), Impending Crisis of the South; Walker's Appeal. Daniel Worth, a Wesleyan [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education
by Brabham, Robin. Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education by Robin Brabham, 2006 See also: Pupil Assignment Act. Swann v. Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education, argued before the U.S. Supreme [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Swepson, George William
by Wyllie, Robert J. George William Swepson, businessman and Republican activist during Reconstruction, was born in Mecklenburg County, Va., but in the early 1840s moved to Caswell County, N.C., where he is said to have [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Taylor, Hannis
by Mcwilliams, Tennant S. Hannis Taylor, lawyer, scholar, and diplomat, was born in New Bern, the son of Susan Stevenson and Richard Nixon Taylor, a merchant. He was the grandson of Mary Hannis and William Taylor, Scottish [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
United States v. American Tobacco Company
by Hunt, James L. United States v. American Tobacco Company was a 1911 U.S. Supreme Court case in which the Court found that a large number of persons and corporations-including North Carolinians James Buchanan Duke, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
University v. Foy
by Orth, John V. University v. Foy, a case decided by the North Carolina Supreme Court in 1805, was brought by the University of North Carolina to protect property it had acquired pursuant to its statutory right to [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Wilmington Ten
by Stinson, Craig M. On 6 Feb. 1971, after weeks of racial tension over integration of the public school system in Wilmington, a white-owned grocery store in a black neighborhood was firebombed. A year later Ben Chavis, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Witchcraft
by Powell, William S. Belief in witchcraft influenced people for hundreds of years, and many unexplained occurrences were considered supernatural in origin. In America, the New England colonies were the scene of notorious [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
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