Military

Military
Adams-Ender, Clara
by Pollitt, Phoebe Ann. Originally published in "North Carolina Nursing History." Republished with permission. For personal educational use and not for further distribution. Please submit permission requests for other uses [...] (from Appalachian State University.)
Albemarle, CSS
by Blair, Dan. The CSS Albemarle, an ironclad ram, was one of the Confederacy's most successful ironclads. This vessel and its sister ship, the CSS Neuse, were designed to wrest control of North Carolina's sounds [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
American Legion
by Belton, Tom. The American Legion maintains an important presence in North Carolina, a state that is home to several large military bases and thousands of active and retired soldiers. The U.S. Congress officially [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Armories
by Belton, Tom, Powell, William S., Tetterton, Beverly. Armories by William S. Powell, 2006 Additional research provided by Tom Belton and Beverly Tetterton. See also: Asheville Armory. References to armories, where matériel for common [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Asheville Armory
by McKinney, Gordon B. Three Asheville businessmen-Robert Pulliam, Ephraim Clayton, and George Whitson-established the Asheville Armory in 1862. By November of that year, they were employing 107 workers and had produced [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Asheville, USS
by Holland, Ron, Ashe, Walter. The city of Asheville had four naval warships named in its honor during the twentieth century. The USS Asheville (PG-21) was the first warship built at the Charleston Naval Shipyard in Charleston, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Bethel Regiment
by Powell, William S. Bethel Regiment was the popular name of the first regiment of volunteers raised in North Carolina at the beginning of the Civil War. Commanded by Col. Daniel Harvey Hill, it played a significant role [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Camp Johnson (Montford Point)
by Hill, Michael. Camp Johnson (Montford Point) by Michael Hill, Research Branch, NC Office of Archives and History, 2000 www.ncmarkers.com/   See also: Camp [...] (from Research Branch, NC Office of Archives and History.)
Camp Lejeune
by Farnham, Thomas J. Camp Lejeune by Thomas J. Farnham, 2006 See also: Cherry Point Marine Corps Air [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Cathey's Fort
by Suther, Steve. Cathey's Fort was built in McDowell County by William Cathey in 1776. Cathey had purchased land near Turkey Cove at the foot of the mountains and there, where Cove Creek joined the North Fork of the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Cemeteries, National and State
by Powell, William S., Tetterton, Beverly. North Carolina's four national cemeteries are located in New Bern, Raleigh, Salisbury, and Wilmington. From the end of the Civil War until the First World War, these cemeteries were often referred to [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Charlotte Navy Yard
by Blair, Dan. Charlotte became one of the Confederate navy's most important manufacturing centers during the Civil War. The incongruity of a landlocked city housing a navy yard is explained by its location in [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Cherry Point Marine Corps Air Station
by Bell, John L. Cherry Point Marine Corps Air Station was established on 6 Aug. 1941 on 8,000 acres south of New Bern. On 20 May 1942 the field was named Cunningham Field to honor Lt. Col. Alfred A. Cunningham, the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Civil War Desertion
by Smith, Michael Thomas. Civil War Desertion by Michael Thomas Smith, 2006 See also: Civil War (UNC Press) ; Civil War Civil [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Clark's Regimental Histories
by Powell, William S. "Clark's Regimental Histories" is the popular title for the five-volume Histories of the Several Regiments and Battalions from North Carolina in the Great War, 1861-1865, edited by Walter Clark and [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Colson's Supply Depot
by Cross, Jerry L. Colson's Supply Depot was a fortified Revolutionary War post located in southwestern Montgomery County on the east side of the Pee Dee River, near Mount Gilead (Montgomery County). Constructed in [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Conscription
by Salemson, Daniel J. Conscription by Daniel J. Salemson, 2006 See also: Desertion, Civil War; World War [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Council of Safety
by Towles, Louis P. The Council of Safety was created as an interim government by North Carolina's Fourth Provincial Congress, which met at Halifax in April and May 1776. In the absence of a permanent government created [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Davis School
by Williams, Wiley J. The Davis School in Lenoir County, a boarding school for boys and young men, was established in LaGrange in 1880 by Adam Clark Davis Jr., reportedly the great-great-grandson of James Davis, the first [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Dickinson, Georgia Rae: Waves On The Beach
by Cecelski, David S. The Cherry Point Marine Corps Air Station opened near the remote crossroads of Havelock in 1942. Originally known as Cunningham Field, it included a vast industrial complex where civilian tradesmen [...] (from Listening to History, News and Observer.)
Dunmore's Ethiopian Regiment
by Causey, Ellen Fitzgibbons. Dunmore's Ethiopian Regiment consisted of runaway slaves who served as English troops under the last royal governor of Virginia, Lord John Dunmore. In November 1775 Dunmore, who had wearied of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry Company
by Steelman, Lala Carr. Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry Company by Lala Carr Steelman, 2006 The Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry Company (FILI) was formed on 23 Aug. 1793, when European countries were [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
First at Bethel, Farthest to the Front at Gettysburg and Chickamauga, and Last at Appomattox
by Poff, Jan-Michael. "First at Bethel, Farthest to the Front at Gettysburg and Chickamauga, and Last at Appomattox" is a traditional saying honoring the role of North Carolina's soldiers in the Civil War. Editor Walter [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
First Women Marines
by Wegner, Ansley Herring. Camp Lejeune prides itself as the home of the Montford Point Marines, the Corps’ first black enlistees, and the first large unit of female Marines, known as the Marine Corps Women’s Reserve. The [...] (from Research Branch, NC Office of Archives and History.)
Fort Bragg
by Parker, Roy, Jr. Fort Bragg by Roy Parker Jr., 2006 See also: Pope Air Force Base; Cherry Point Marine Corps Air Station; Seymour Johnson Air Force Base Fort Bragg, a 300-square-mile military [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Fort Dobbs
by Branch, Paul. Fort Dobbs, located in present-day Statesville, was a defensive fort built in 1756 under the auspices of North Carolina's colonial Assembly during the French and Indian War. The large log fort, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Fort Hamby
by Davis, Charles C. Fort Hamby in Caldwell County, actually a well-fortified, sturdy house, was located in an isolated region and near the end of the Civil War served as a home for outlaws from both the Confederate and [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Fort Johnston
by Stokes, Matt. Fort Johnston by Matt Stokes Research Branch, NC Office of Archives and History, 2007. http://www.ncmarkers.com In 1745 Governor Gabriel Johnston ordered that [...] (from Research Branch, NC Office of Archives and History.)
Gatling Gun
by Parramore, Thomas C. Inventor Richard Jordan Gatling was born in Hertford County in September 1818. Issued his first patent in 1844 for a rice-seed planter, he soon moved to St. Louis, Mo., and successfully marketed the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Grimes, Bryan
by Daniels, James D. Bryan Grimes, Confederate general and planter, was born on a large plantation in Pitt County, approximately eight miles west of the town of Washington. The plantation had been named Grimesland by [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Grimes, Jesse
by Kirkman, Roger N. Jesse Grimes, political and military leader in the Republic of Texas, was born in Duplin County, the son of Sampson and Bethsheba Winder Grimes. He evidently had little formal education. In January [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Holden, Joseph William
by Raper, Horace W. Joseph William Holden, poet, newspaperman, and state political leader, was born in Raleigh, the son of William Woods and Ann Augusta Young Holden. He attended the Lovejoy School in Raleigh and later [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Home Guard
by Norris, David A. Although the term "Home Guard" appears in the names of several North Carolina military units raised early in the Civil War, it usually refers to the statewide organization formed by an act of the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Honor and Remember Flag
by Childs, T. Mike. State Honor and Remember Flag of North Carolina by T. Mike ChildsNC Government & Heritage Library, 2012. See also: State Flag On August 4, 2010, the [...] (from Government & Heritage Library, State Library of North Carolina.)
Horner School
by Anderson, Jean B. The Horner School, Horner and Graves's School, and Horner Military Academy were a few of the names given to the secondary school established by James Hunter Horner and his family members over the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Howell, Rednap
by Johnson, Elmer D. Rednap Howell, "poet of the Regulators," moved to North Carolina from New Jersey, probably in the early 1760s. He settled first in present Chatham County, then moved about 1768 to what is now [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Jackson, Della Hayden Raney
by Pollitt, Phoebe Ann. Originally published in "North Carolina Nursing History." Republished with permission. For personal educational use and not for further distribution. Please submit permission requests for other uses [...] (from Appalachian State University.)
Jones, Edmund
by Long, Joe O'Neal. Edmund Jones, soldier, attorney, and public servant, was born into a life of ease on his father's plantation, Clover Hill, situated about six miles north of Lenoir in Caldwell County. The family name [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Korean War
by Cockrell, David L. When communist North Korea first invaded its southern neighbor, North Carolina's entire congressional delegation supported President Harry Truman's use of U.S. troops to combat the aggression. On 28 [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
La academia militar oficial
by . Extraído de Libro de hechos de El Viejo Estado del Norte. La propiedad literaria 2011 por la Oficina de Archivos e Historia de Carolina del Norte, Departamento de Recursos Culturale de [...] (from NC Office of Archives and History.)
Lafayette's Visit
by Parramore, Thomas C. As an official guest of the United States in 1824 and 1825, the Marquis de Lafayette, at age 68, planned to remain in the northern and middle Atlantic states, avoiding extensive travel. But after [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Lake Lure Rest and Redistribution Center
by Bell, John L. Lake Lure Rest and Redistribution Center by John L. Bell, 2006 See also: World War II Military Installations in the State; World War II: Part 1- Introduction The Lake Lure Rest and [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Leventhorpe, Collett
by Branch, Paul. Collett Leventhorpe, physician and soldier, was born at Exmouth, Devonshire, England, where his parents were temporarily residing for reasons of sustaining his father's health. His family lineage [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
MacRae, William
by Branch, Paul. William MacRae, railroad manager, civil engineer, and Confederate general, was born in Wilmington. His family was descended from the clan MacRae from Rosshire on the seacoast of the western Highlands [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Martin, James
by Rodenbough, Charles D. James Martin, merchant, soldier, and legislator, was born in Lebanon Township, Hunterdon County, N.J., the second son of Hugh and Jane Hunter Martin. His father conducted an English school for a [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Martin, James Green
by Branch, Paul. James Green Martin, Confederate officer and lawyer, was born at Elizabeth City, the oldest son of William and Sophia Scott Daugé Martin. His father, a prominent planter and shipbuilder, had served in [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Martin, Joseph
by Shrader, Richard A. Joseph Martin, soldier, pioneer, and Indian agent, was born near Charlottesville in Albemarle County, Va., the son of Joseph, a farmer, and Susannah Childs Martin. Instead of pursuing an education as [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Military Ocean Terminal at Sunny Point
by Tetterton, Beverly. The Military Ocean Terminal at Sunny Point is situated on the west bank of the Cape Fear River, 26 miles south of Wilmington, in Brunswick County. It occupies approximately 8,500 acres between the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Military Women (from Tar Heel Junior Historian)
by Trojanowski, Hermann J. During World War II, over 350,000 women from across the United States served in the military. More than 7,000 of these women came from North Carolina. As far back as the Revolutionary War, women had [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Militias, Colonial
by Towles, Louis P. Militias, Colonial by Louis P. Towles, 2006 Settlers in North Carolina in the 1660s were required to own musket, powder, and shot in order to claim land grants, and as early as 1667 [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Monitor, USS
by Blair, Dan. The USS Monitor, lying in 230 feet of water off Cape Hatteras, is probably the most famous victim of the infamous "Graveyard of the Atlantic" off the North Carolina coast. The Monitor was the third [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Moore General Hospital
by Wright, Ann S. Moore General Hospital, located between Swannanoa and Black Mountain on U.S. 70, was built as a general army hospital for the treatment of sick and wounded soldiers during World War II. Named for [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Morris Field
by Howard, Joshua. Morris Field by Joshua Howard, 2006 Morris Field was conceived in 1936 as a New Deal Works Project Administration program in Charlotte. In April 1941 the Army Air Corps [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Mosquito Fleet
by Barrett, John G. The Mosquito Fleet was the whimsical nickname for the four small steamers that comprised the North Carolina Navy at the beginning of the Civil War. The ships were under orders not only to defend [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
NASA Tracking Station in North Carolina
by Hill, Michael. North Carolina's NASA Tracking Station: Rosman Satellite Tracking and Data Acquisition Facility by Michael Hill Research Branch, NC Office of Archives and History, [...] (from Research Branch, NC Office of Archives and History.)
National Guard
by Williams, Wiley J., Howard, Jeffrey Allen, Branch, Paul. National Guard by Wiley J. Williams, 2006 Additional research provided by Paul Branch and Jeffrey Allen Howard. North Carolina has maintained a military force since the Revolutionary War. [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Naval Section Bases
by Branch, Paul. Naval section bases were small naval bases established by the U.S. Navy on the North Carolina coast prior to and during World War II for coastal patrol and antisubmarine defense. In 1940-41, when it [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
NC Military Installations - Civil War - Batteries
by Branch, Paul, Davis, Charles C. North Carolina Military Installations - Civil War Return to: North Carolina Military Installations, Civil War Go to: North Carolina Military Installations - Civil War - Camps; North Carolina [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
NC Military Installations - Civil War - Camps
by Branch, Paul, Davis, Charles C. North Carolina Military Installations - Civil War Return to: North Carolina Military Installations - Civil War Go to: North Carolina Military Installations - Civil War - Forts; North Carolina [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
NC Military Installations - Civil War - Forts
by Branch, Paul, Davis, Charles C. North Carolina Military Installations - Civil War Return to: North Carolina Military Installations - Civil War Go to: North Carolina Military Installations - Civil War - Camps; North Carolina [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina in WWI: An introduction
by Marshall, R. Jackson, III. North Carolina in World War I: An introduction by R. Jackson Marshall III Reprinted with permission from Tar Heel Junior Historian, Spring 1993. Tar Heel Junior Historian Association, NC [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
North Carolina Military Academy
by Anderson, Jean B., Ireland, Robert E. The North Carolina Military Academy, also called the Hillsborough Military Academy, was established in Hillsborough in 1859 by Charles C. Tew, a graduate of The Citadel, and chartered in 1861. While [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina Military Institute
by Andrew, Rod, Jr. North Carolina Military Institute by Rod Andrew Jr., 2006 The North Carolina Military Institute, a state-supported military school, opened in Charlotte in 1859. North Carolina by that time had [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina State Veterans Day Parade: Town of Warsaw
by Agan, Kelly. On June 24, 2016 the North Carolina General Assembly adopted the Veterans Day Parade held in the Town of Warsaw in Duplin County as the official State Veterans Day Parade (S.B. 160).  The bill to [...] (from Government & Heritage Library, State Library of North Carolina.)
North Carolina, USS
by Stinson, Craig M. When commissioned at the New York Naval Shipyard on 9 Apr. 1941, the USS North Carolina was considered the "greatest sea weapon in the world." Built at a cost of $70 million, the new [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina’s Youngest Soldiers: The Junior Reserves (From Tar Heel Junior Historian)
by Coffey, Michael W. North Carolina’s Youngest Soldiers: The Junior Reserves By Michael W. Coffey, PhD Reprinted with permission from the Tar Heel Junior Historian, Spring 2011. Tar Heel Junior Historian [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Oak Ridge Military Academy
by Stoesen, Alexander R. Oak Ridge Military Academy traces its origins to 7 Apr. 1850, when local citizens "desirous of promoting the cause of education" met and appointed a board of trustees to secure funds to erect a [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Old Hickory Division
by Marshall, R. Jackson, III. The Old Hickory Division, a World War I unit, initially consisted of National Guard units from North Carolina, South Carolina, and Tennessee. Officially the Thirtieth Division, it was nicknamed in [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Overseas Replacement Depot
by Ellis, Clyde. Between March 1943 and September 1946 Greensboro was home to the country's largest military base within the limits of any American city; more than 330,000 soldiers passed through its gates. Built on [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Parson, Donald
by Powell, William S. Donald Parson, poet, author, and authority on the game of bridge, was born in Washington, D.C., the son of William Edwin and Anna Rebecca Naille Parson. He was graduated cum laude from Harvard [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Peace, William
by Frazier, Mrs. S. David. William Peace, merchant and philanthropist, Presbyterian layman, and founder of Peace Institute, was born in Granville County. His father, John Peace, was a wealthy planter; his mother was Margaret [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Pender, Josiah Solomon
by Johnston, Hugh Buckner. Josiah Solomon Pender, poet, artist, army officer, and Confederate blockade-runner, was the son of Solomon and Mary Batts Pender of the Tarboro area of Edgecombe County, both of whom were descended [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Pender, William Dorsey
by Barrett, John G. William Dorsey Pender, Confederate soldier, was born in that part of Edgecombe County that became Wilson County in 1855, the son of James and Sarah Routh Pender. He received his early education in [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Pennsylvania Farmer
by Norris, David A. The Pennsylvania Farmer was the most well known of three vessels obtained for the North Carolina Navy in early 1776 for service in the American Revolution. The North Carolina Provincial Council, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Person, Benjamin Thomas
by Johnston, Hugh Buckner. Benjamin Thomas Person, physician, legislator, and postmaster, was a son of Thomas and Sally Tarver Person of Greene County. Details of his youth and education are unavailable. He enlisted on 17 Mar. [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Pettigrew, James Johnston
by Wilson, Clyde. James Johnston Pettigrew, lawyer, scholar, and Confederate general, was born at Bonarva in Tyrrell County, eighth of the nine children of Ebenezer and Ann Blount Shepard Pettigrew. He was educated at [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Peyton, Benjamin
by Smith, Claiborne T., Jr. Benjamin Peyton, colonial official and legislator, was born in Gloucester County, Va., the son of Robert Peyton. His grandfather, Robert Peyton, who settled in Virginia prior to 1680, was the son of [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Philips, Abraham
by Butler, Lindley S. Abraham Philips, militia general and state legislator, was born in England and settled in northern Guilford (now Rockingham) County by 1778. His home, which was still standing in the late 1970s, was [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Picket, USS
by Branch, Paul. The USS Picket was a small Union gunboat that fought during the Civil War in the sounds and rivers of North Carolina until September 1862, when it was sunk in the Tar River at Washington, N.C. The [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Pool, Stephen Decatur, Jr.
by Jennette, B. Culpepper, Jr. Pool, Stephen Decatur, Jr. by B. Culpepper Jennette, Jr., 1994 11 Nov. 1847–8 Feb. 1892 Stephen Decatur Pool, Jr., Confederate soldier, lawyer, and journalist, was born in Elizabeth City, [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Pope Air Force Base
by Bell, John L. Pope Air Force Base by John L. Bell, 2006 Pope Air Force Base was established in 1919 as Pope Field, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Preddy, George Earl, Jr.
by Sox, Samuel L., Jr. George Earl Preddy, Jr., army Air Corps officer and highest ranking P-51 Mustang ace of World War II, was born in Greensboro, the son of George E., a railroad man employed by the Southern Railway, [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Privateers
by Stick, David. Privateers were privately owned and manned ships authorized by their governments during wartime to attack and capture enemy shipping vessels. Documents called "letters of marque" officially spelled [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Purdie, Thomas J[ames?]
by Pate, James L., Jr. Thomas J[ames?] Purdie, Confederate officer, was born at Purdie Hall on the Cape Fear River in Bladen County, between Fayetteville and Elizabethtown, the second son of James B. (d. 1834) and Anna [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Ramsgate Road
by Powell, William S. Ramsgate Road, afterward corrupted into "Ramcat Road," was constructed by militiamen from Johnston and Wake Counties in about one week in May 1771 as a military road following an older Indian trail. [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Rangers
by Powell, William S. Rangers were county officers in North Carolina from the colonial period until 1868. The post was a survival of British officialdom when royal parks and forests were patrolled against intruders and [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Ransom, Robert, Jr.
by McBride, Benjamin Ransom. Robert Ransom Jr., U.S. army officer, Confederate general, and civil engineer, was born at his family plantation, Bridle Creek, in Warren County. The son of Robert and Priscilla West Coffield [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Renfrow, William Cary
by Powell, William S. William Cary Renfrow, governor of Oklahoma Territory, was born in Smithfield, the son of Perry and Lucinda Hawkins Atkinson Rentfrow [sic ]. After attending local schools young Renfrow volunteered [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Reserve Troops
by Powell, William S. Reserve Troops by William S. Powell, 2006 See also:North Carolina’s Youngest Soldiers: The Junior Reserves (From Tar Heel Junior Historian); Battle of Bentonville; Battle of Averasboro; Battle [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Revenue Cutter Service
by Tetterton, Beverly. The Revenue Cutter Service, which employed federal cutters to enforce maritime laws, was established in 1790 to collect much-needed revenue for a post-Revolutionary War U.S. Treasury and to terminate [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Rhyne, Abel Peterson
by Cauble, Frank P. Abel Peterson Rhyne, textile manufacturer, Confederate soldier, and patron of education, was born on a farm near Mount Holly in Lincoln (now Gaston) County. Of German ancestry, he was a descendant of [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Richardson, Robert Vinkler
by Branch, Paul, Jr. Robert Vinkler Richardson, lawyer, Confederate officer, and civil engineer, was born in Granville County. At an early age, he and his family moved to Tennessee, settling in Hardeman County. Here [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Ridley, Dan
by Smith, Claiborne T., Jr. Dan Ridley, Revolutionary patriot, was probably the son of Nathaniel Ridley II of Southampton County, Va., and his wife Priscilla Apple-whaite. As a young man, Ridley moved across the line from [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Roberts, John
by Massengill, Stephen E. John Roberts, planter, legislator, and militia officer, probably was born in the Bogue Sound area of Carteret County. His parents were William and Jemima (Jamima) Roberts, who owned a well-stocked, [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Roberts, William Anderson
by Plumblee, M. Q. William Anderson Roberts, artist, farmer, and Confederate soldier of English descent, was born in new Prospect Church three miles west of Yanceyville, the son of Elijah, a farmer, and Rebecca B. [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Roberts, William Paul
by Branch, Paul. William Paul Roberts, Confederate soldier, legislator, and state auditor, was born in Gates County, the son of John Smith and Jane Gatling Boyt Roberts. He received little formal education other than [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Rocketry Experiments
by Dough, Wynne. Rocketry experiments were conducted in two locations along the North Carolina coast from the 1940s to the 1970s. After World War II, the U.S. Navy leased much of Topsail Island (Pender County) as a [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Royal North Carolina Regiment
by Troxler, Carole Watterson. The Royal North Carolina Regiment was the premier provincial corps of Loyalist North Carolinians during the Revolutionary War. Provincial corps were regiments that served with British forces; their [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Royall, Kenneth Claiborne
by Caldwell, George M. Kenneth Claiborne Royall, lawyer, secretary of war, and the first secretary of the army after President Harry S Truman's reorganization of the armed services under the Department of Defense, was born [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Sauthier, Claude Joseph
by Cumming, William P. Claude Joseph Sauthier, one of the ablest civilian and military surveyors and mapmakers of the Revolutionary period, was born in Strasbourg, Alsace, the eldest child of Joseph Philippe, a saddler, [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Seymour Johnson Air Force Base
by Price, Eugene. Seymour Johnson Air Force Base by Eugene Price, 2006 Seymour Johnson Field, Goldsboro, was activated on 12 June 1942 as Headquarters, Technical School, Army Air Force Technical Training [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Sharp, Jacob Hunter
by Terpening, Gary. Jacob Hunter Sharp, lawyer, Confederate officer, legislator, and newspaper editor, was born in Hertford County and at an early age moved with his family to Pickens County, Ala. Not long after [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Simmons, James Frederick
by Powell, William S. James Frederick Simmons, poet, newspaperman, and judge, was born in Halifax, the son of James (1800–1891) and Susan Gary Simmons. His mother died when he was an infant and he was raised by an aunt, [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Spanish-American War
by Williams, Wiley J., Norris, David A., Voigt, Robert C. The Spanish-American War, fought over Cuban independence and lasting less than six months in 1898, afforded North Carolinians a brief interlude in a period of intense political confrontations. In [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Stem, Thaddeus Garland, Jr.
by Glover, Erma Williams. Thaddeus Garland Stem, Jr., poet, essayist, newspaper columnist, and short-story writer, the son of Thaddeus G., attorney at law, and Hallie Mayes Stem, was born in his parents' home at 104 East [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Submarine Attacks
by Branch, Paul, Barefoot, Daniel W. Submarine Attacks by Paul Branch and Daniel W. Barefoot, 2006 See also: Coast Guard, U.S.; Mirlo Rescue; U-Boats off the Outer Banks; The Allan Jackson:  First North Carolina Coastal [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Substitutes (Civil War)
by Norris, David A. Substitutes (Civil War) by David A. Norris, 2006 As the Civil War dragged on and enthusiasm for volunteer enlistments lagged, both sides resorted to conscription to fill their ranks. This [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Tar Heel
by Taylor, Michael W. "Tar Heel" is the nickname for a native or resident of North Carolina as well as for the state itself, which is known as the Tar Heel State. The term appears to have come into popular use after the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Tarrant, Edward H[enry?]
by Price, Joseph L. Edward H[enry?] Tarrant, soldier, Indian fighter, and Texas official, was born in North Carolina, probably in Caswell County, as one Henry Tarrant was active there between 1799 and 1801. Manlove [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Tate, James
by Stephens, H. Kenneth, II. James Tate, schoolmaster and clergyman, went to Wilmington, N.C., from Ireland in 1760 and opened the first classical school in North Carolina under Presbyterian influence. He initially resided in a [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Taylor, James Peyton
by Powell, William S. James Peyton Taylor, Confederate soldier and teacher, was born near Pittsboro, the son of the Reverend William Peter, a Methodist minister, and Mary High Taylor. He was graduated from The University [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Taylor, Simon Bruton
by Fountain, A. M. Taylor, Simon Bruton by A. M. Fountain, 1996 16 Mar. 1834–27 Jan. 1929 Simon Bruton Taylor, Confederate officer, merchant, public official, and farmer, was born on a farm in southern Lenoir [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Thackston, James
by Menius, Arthur C. James Thackston, was a rather suspect figure of secondary importance in North Carolina mercantile, political, and military affairs throughout the Revolutionary period. Thackston (occasionally spelled [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Trousdale, William
by Snow, Claude H., Jr. William Trousdale, soldier, statesman, and ambassador, was born in Orange County, the son of James and Elizabeth Dobbins Trousdale. James Trousdale had commanded a company of North Carolina Patriots [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
U.S. Army Redistribution Stations in World War II: Asheville, North Carolina
by Peek, Matthew M. During World War II, the U.S. military created personnel Redistribution Centers, which provided rest and recreation for military combat personnel returning to the United States from overseas service. [...] (from NC Office of Archives and History.)
Underwriter, USS
by Branch, Paul. The USS Underwriter, a navy gunboat, fought in the sounds and rivers of North Carolina during the Civil War. Early in 1864 the Underwriter was in the Neuse River at New Bern when Confederate forces [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Vendors and Lenders: New Deal to the 1950s
by Parramore, Thomas C., Watson, Harry L., Nathans, Sydney, Anderson, Jean Bradley, Clayton, Thomas H., Fenn, Elizabeth A., Wood, Peter H. By Elizabeth A. Fenn, Peter H. Wood, Harry L. Watson, Thomas H. Clayton, Sydney Nathans, Thomas C. Parramore, and Jean B. Anderson; Maps by Mark Anderson Moore. Edited by Joe A. Mobley. [...] (from The Way We Lived in North Carolina, NC Office of Archives and History and UNC Press.)
Wasp
by Cross, Jerry L. The Wasp was a privateer commanded by Capt. Johnston Blakeley during the War of 1812. The sloop was still under construction at Newburyport, Mass., when Blakeley received his appointment on 13 Aug. [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Watson, Henry Bulls
by Powell, William S. Henry Bulls Watson, professional military officer, was born in Johnston County, the son of Willis and Elizabeth (Betsy) Bulls Watson. Nothing is known of his early education, but on 5 Oct. 1836, more [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Weaver, James Harvey
by Summers, Jim L. James Harvey Weaver, athletic administrator, was born at Rutherford College, of which his father was president. One of five children of the Reverend Charles Clinton and Florence Stacy Weaver, his [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Weldon, Samuel
by Smith, Claiborne T., Jr. Weldon, Samuel by Claiborne T. Smith, Jr., 1996 ca. 1730–82 Samuel Weldon, Revolutionary patriot, was born in Henrico County, Va., the youngest son of Samuel Weldon and the brother of [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Wellborn (Welborn), James
by Powell, William S. James Wellborn (Welborn), army officer and legislator, was born in that part of Rowan County that first became Surry County and then Wilkes County in 1778. Here he made his home during a long life, [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Whiting, William Henry Chase
by Wilson, Clyde. William Henry Chase Whiting, Confederate general and defender of Wilmington, a descendant of prominent seventeenth-century English settlers in Massachusetts, was born in Biloxi, Miss., the son of [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Wildcat Division
by Marshall, R. Jackson, III. The Wildcat Division, a World War I unit officially known as the Eighty-first National Army Division, was organized in August 1917 with drafted soldiers, mostly from North Carolina, South Carolina, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
WWI: Boot camp in Charlotte
by Perzel, Edward S. In the summer of 1917, the United States government needed places to train large numbers of troops quickly. It looked to the South because of its warm climate. The North Carolina cities of [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
WWI: Last days of the War
by Marshall, R. Jackson, III. On the cold night of November 10, 1918, Sergeant Noah Whicker, 321st Infantry Regiment, 81st Division, could not sleep. He stayed awake in the trenches and “walked all night to keep from freezing.” [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
WWI: Life on the western front
by Jensen, Les. WWI: Life on the western front by Les Jensen Reprinted with permission from Tar Heel Junior Historian, Spring 1993. Tar Heel Junior Historian Association, NC Museum of History See [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
WWI: Medicine on the battlefield
by Campbell, John. From a medical standpoint, World War I was a miserable and bloody affair. In less than a year the American armed forces suffered more than 318,000 casualties, of which 120,000 were deaths. Almost [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
WWI: Technology and the weapons of war
by McLean, A. Torrey. One of the saddest facts about World War I is that millions died needlessly because military and civilian leaders were slow to adapt their old-fashioned strategies and tactics to the new weapons of [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Zebulon B. Vance, USS
by Warren, Harry S. The USS Zebulon B. Vance was launched in Wilmington on 6 Dec. 1941, one day before the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. At the ceremony, North Carolina governor J. Melville Broughton proclaimed, "As [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
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