Slavery

Slavery
1830-1850: Antebellum NC Begins
by Watson, Harry L. 1830-1850: Antebellum NC Begins Originally published as "Winning the Fight for Progress-- North Carolina's Antebellum years begin: 1830-1850" by Harry L. Watson Reprinted with permission from [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Ad Valorem Taxation of Slaves
by Faulkner, Ronnie W. Ad valorem taxation of slaves was a major political issue in antebellum North Carolina and continued during the Civil War as a manifestation of the divisions between the planter class and the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
African Americans & the Revolution
by Crow, Jeffrey J. The story of how the original thirteen American colonies broke away from Great Britain and formed the United States is well known. Less well known is how African-Americans felt and what they did [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
African Americans - Part 2: Life under slavery
by Alexander, Roberta Sue, Barfield, Rodney D., Nash, Steven E. Part i: Introduction; Part ii: Life under slavery and the achievements of free blacks; Part iii: Emancipation and the Freedmen's Fight for Civil Rights; Part iv: Segregation and the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
African and African American Storytelling
by Wilson, Madafo Lloyd. African and African American Storytelling By Madafo Lloyd Wilson Reprinted with permission from the Tar Heel Junior Historian, Spring 2002. Tar Heel Junior Historian Association, NC Museum of [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Agricultural Economy of Antebellum Life
by LeCount, Charles. One hundred fifty years ago, nearly all North Carolinians made their living by farming. And even the majority of those who did not actually farm were still tied to the state’s agricultural economy: [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Anti-Slavery Movement in North Carolina
by Lasley, Rebecca Graham. Appearances can be deceiving. At first glance, the wagon pictured to the right looks like an ordinary farm vehicle of the early 1800s. It consists of a simple wooden box mounted on wheels that are [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Blue Lodges
by McGee, Barry. Blue Lodges were secret groups organized to defend slavery and the "southern way of life" in response to the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854. The new law, sponsored by Senator Stephen A. Douglas of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Brown, Hattie: A Freedom Story
by Cecelski, David S. I spoke with Hattie Brown as we walked through the old graveyard in Goshen, a black farming community in Jones County. She had a story for each of the dead. Her most striking memories were her [...] (from Listening to History, News and Observer.)
Caledonia
by Gaddis, Elijah. Caledonia, located just south of the Roanoke River in Halifax County, North Carolina, has undergone many changes in its 300 year history. Starting in the early 18th century, Caledonia was settled by [...] (from NCpedia.)
Civil Rights in North Carolina
by Brown, Flora Bryant. African American Civil Rights in North Carolina by Dr. Flora Bryant Brown Reprinted with permission from the Tar Heel Junior Historian. Fall 2004. Tar Heel Junior Historian Association, NC [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Coffin, Levi
by Hoskins, Mary Katherine. Levi Coffin, abolitionist, temperance leader, and philanthropist, was born in New Garden, Guilford County, a descendant of Tristam Coffin, who came to America in 1642 and was one of nine purchasers [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Colonization Societies
by Mitchell, Memory F., Canipe, Jeremy T. Colonization Societies were organized in the early nineteenth century to promote the relocation of African Americans, particularly free blacks, to places such as Haiti, Liberia, the American Midwest, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Copeland, John Anthony: Tar Heels at Harper's Ferry, October 16-18, 1859
by Howard, Joshua. Tar Heels at Harper's Ferry, October 16-18, 1859: John Anthony Copeland By Joshua Howard, Research Branch, NC Office of Archives and History, 2011 Reprinted with permission from [...] (from Research Branch, NC Office of Archives and History.)
David Walker's Appeal
by Hunter, Crystal. Born in Wilmington, N.C. in 1785, to a free mother and an enslaved father, David Walker, although deemed free by law, was no stranger to the “avaricious” (a term he uses throughout the Appeal to [...] (from NCpedia.)
Devereux, John, Jr.
by Armistead, Terrell L. Devereux, John, Jr. by Terrell L. Armistead, 1986 17 Dec. 1820–10 Apr. [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Dred
by Inscoe, John C. Dred, published in 1856, was Harriet Beecher Stowe's much-anticipated sequel to Uncle Tom's Cabin (1852) in which she sought to further fan the flames of antislavery sentiment. The book was a [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Emancipation
by Nash, Steven E. emancipation by steven e. nash, 2006 see also: contrabands; african americans - part 3: emancipation emancipation of enslaved african americans in the south became official on 1 jan. [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Emancipation Day
by Towles, Louis P. Emancipation Day by Louis P. Towles, 2006 Emancipation Day in North Carolina was initiated on 1 Jan. 1865 at Union-occupied New [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Forced Migration of African Americans
by Farley, Jennifer. This African chant mourns the loss of Olaudah Equiano, an eleven-year-old boy who, in 1755, was kidnapped from his home in what is now Nigeria. He was purchased by a captain in the British Royal [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Free Produce
by Powell, William S. "Free produce" was the term applied to anything grown, manufactured, or otherwise produced by nonslave labor. The term came into use when abolitionists, particularly Quakers, agreed to avoid buying [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Free Soilers
by McGee, Barry. Free Soilers were members of an antislavery political party in the years before the Civil War that supported free distribution of government-owned lands. Most North Carolinians probably could have [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Goodloe, Daniel Reaves
by Yanchisin, D. A. Daniel Reaves Goodloe, abolitionist and journalist, was born in Louisburg, the son of Dr. James Kemp Strother Goodloe, a school-teacher who studied medicine but never practiced it, and Mary Reaves [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Hedrick, Benjamin Sherwood
by Knapp, Sharon E. Benjamin Sherwood Hedrick, educator, chemist, and antislavery leader, was born in western Davidson County near Salisbury, the son of Elizabeth Sherwood and John Leonard Hedrick, a farmer and [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Impending Crisis of the South, The
by Faulkner, Ronnie W. The Impending Crisis of the South by Ronnie W. Faulkner, 2006 The Impending Crisis of the South, by Rowan County born abolitionist Hinton Rowan Helper (1829-1909), was published by A. B. [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Jacobs, Harriet
by Yellin, Jean Fagan. Harriet Jacobs, writer and reformer, was born a slave in Edenton. Her grandmother, "Yellow" Molly Horniblow, who was freed in 1828, subsequently bought a house in Edenton and earned her living as a [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Jones, Marvin Tupper: Pleasant Plains
by Cecelski, David S. I recently joined Marvin Tupper Jones at his family's annual reunion and fish fry. We were in Pleasant Plains, part of an extraordinary, 9-mile-long swath of land in the state's rural, northeast [...] (from Listening to History, News and Observer.)
Jones, Thomas H.
by Leder, Eric. Jones, Thomas H. By Eric Leder, North Carolina State University, 2013 1806-? Thomas H. Jones was a self-educated abolitionist, minister, and author who spent much of his [...] (from NCpedia.)
Jones, Thomas McKissick
by Parris, Richard W. Thomas McKissick Jones, lawyer, judge, legislator, and Confederate congressman, was born in Person County, the son of Wilson and Rebecca McKissick Jones. When Thomas was an infant, the family moved [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Joyner, Edmund Noah
by Malone, E. T., Jr. Edmund Noah Joyner, Episcopal priest, missionary, soldier, poet, and newspaper editor, was born in the Marlboro community near Farmville in Pitt County, the son of Dr. Noah and Emily Adelaide [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Keckly (Keckley), Elizabeth Hobbs
by Wegner, Ansley Herring. Keckly (Keckley), Elizabeth Hobbs by Ansley Wegner, Research Branch, NC Office of Archives and History, 2013 www.ncmarkers.com Elizabeth Hobbs Keckly [...] (from Research Branch, NC Office of Archives and History.)
Knights of the Golden Circle
by Parramore, Thomas C. The Knights of the Golden Circle (KGC) was a secret military organization created in 1859 by George W. L. Bickley in Cincinnati, Ohio. Its stated aim was to sponsor and conduct military expeditions [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Lane, Lunsford
by Cotten, Alice R. Lunsford Lane, slave, businessman, free black, and lecturer, was the only child of Edward and Clarissa Lane, slaves from Raleigh. His parents had assumed the surname of Lane from the white family [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Levi Coffin and Quaker Emigration
by Hall, Lisa Coston. By some estimates, during the first half of the 1800s, roughly a third of North Carolina's residents moved to other states. The third-most populous state in the Union in 1790, North Carolina by 1860 [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Manumission Societies
by Norris, David A., Kirkman, Roger N. Manumission societies began as an eighteenth-century movement to abolish slavery through voluntary emancipation. The undertaking was initiated primarily by the Society of Friends (Quakers) on grounds [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Maroons
by Smith, William S. Maroons by William S. Smith, 2006 See also: African Americans; Great Dismal Swamp; Slave Rebellions; [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
McNeill, John Charles
by Walser, Richard. John Charles McNeill, poet, journalist, and lawyer, was born at Ellerslie, his father's farm near Wagram in Richmond (later Scotland) County. His two grandfathers had emigrated from Argyllshire, [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Melbourn, Julius
by Murray, Elizabeth Davis Reid. Julius Melbourn, said to have been born on 4 July 1790 in Wake County, was apparently a fictitious character invented to perpetrate a literary hoax. In 1847 the firm of Hall and Dickson in Syracuse, [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Newlin, John
by Newlin, Algie I. John Newlin, merchant, industrialist, land speculator, abolitionist, and Quaker leader, was born in the southeastern part of present-day Alamance County. He was in the sixth generation of descendants [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Overseers
by Davis, Charles C. Overseers is a term referring to employees of plantation owners before 1865 who served as general managers of routine farming operations. They sometimes were former indentured servants themselves, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Planters and Slaves
by Parramore, Thomas C., Watson, Harry L., Nathans, Sydney, Anderson, Jean Bradley, Clayton, Thomas H., Fenn, Elizabeth A., Wood, Peter H. Planters and Slaves: 1770-1820 By Elizabeth A. Fenn, Peter H. Wood, Harry L. Watson, Thomas H. Clayton, Sydney Nathans, Thomas C. Parramore, and Jean B. Anderson; Maps by Mark Anderson Moore. [...] (from The Way We Lived in North Carolina, NC Office of Archives and History and UNC Press.)
Quaker Abolitionists
by Huddle, Mark Andrew. The antebellum years were dangerous times for anyone with the temerity to preach an abolitionist gospel in the South. But in the last months of 1847, a young Wesleyan Methodist missionary, the [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Rayner, John Baptis
by Andrews, William L. John Baptis Rayner, educator and politician, was born into slavery in Raleigh, the son of Kenneth Rayner, a prominent plantation owner, and Mary Ricks, a slave. With the aid of his father, Rayner [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Rosedale
by Neill, Rosemary Clifford. Rosedale, a handsome plantation house about three miles from downtown Charlotte, is considered one of the finest examples of Federal architecture in North Carolina. Particularly notable is the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Rush, Christopher
by Carroll, Grady L. E., Sr. Christopher Rush, second superintendent (a title later changed to bishop) of the African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church and a full-blooded African, was born a slave in Craven County. Whether he was [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Said, Omar
by Parramore, Thomas C. Omar Ibn Said, a slave and Arabic scholar, was born in Futa Toro (now a part of the Republic of Senegal) of an aristocratic Moslem family. Educated in Koranic schools, he was a teacher and tradesman [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Scruggs, Lawson Andrew
by Murray, Elizabeth Reid. Scruggs, Lawson Andrew by Elizabeth Reid Murray, 1994 Related Entries: African American; Civil Rights; Historically Black Colleges 15 Jan. 1857–1914 Lawson Andrew Scruggs, physician, [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Settlement of the Coastal Plain
by Watson, Alan D. Settlement of the Coastal Plain, 1650-1775 by Alan D. Watson Reprinted with permission from the Tar Heel Junior Historian. Spring 1995. Tar Heel Junior Historian Association, NC Museum of [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Settlement of the Mountains, 1775-1838 (from Tar Heel Junior Historian)
by Holland, Ron. Settlement of the Mountains, 1775-1838 "North Carolina's Final Frontier" Related Entries: Cherokee Indians; Asheville; Regions by Ron Holland Reprinted with permission from the Tar Heel [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Slave Clandestine Economy
by Schweninger, Loren. Slave Clandestine Economy by Loren Schweninger, 2006 Slave clandestine economy refers to a variety of private agricultural and business endeavors undertaken by some North Carolina slaves. [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Slave Codes
by Lamm, Alan K. The increasing number of black slaves in colonial America created suspicion and fear among the general population and led to a backlash of white reaction known as slave codes. Virginia was the first [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Slave Names
by Inscoe, John C. Slave Names by John C. Inscoe, 2006 Some scholars of slavery have come to view the names and naming of slaves as a meaningful gauge of many aspects of slave life and culture and of how their [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Slave Patrols
by Salemson, Daniel J. North Carolina, unlike other southern states and perhaps due to the lack of major slave rebellions, was slow to establish formal slave patrols. South Carolina first addressed the issue in 1704, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Slave Rebellions
by Parramore, Thomas C., Nash, Steven E. Slave Rebellions by Steven E. Nash and Thomas C. Parramore, 2006 See also: Negro Head Road; Violence, Group Slave rebellions were a recurring fear in North Carolina throughout much [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Slavery
by Crow, Jeffrey J., Dees-Killette, Amelia, Huff, Diane. Slavery by Jeffrey J. Crow, 2006 Additional research provided by Amelia Dees-Killette and Diane Huff. See also: Ad Valorem Taxation of Slaves; Colonization Societies; Manumission [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Slaves' Midsummer Holiday
by Powell, William S. The Slaves' Midsummer Holiday, when slave laborers were permitted a few days off, occurred after crops were laid by and before harvesting began. On 28 Aug. 1862 Catherine Ann Devereux Edmondston of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Smylie, James
by Tise, Larry E. James Smylie, clergyman, church organizer, and controversialist, was born in the Guilford County area of Scots-Irish parentage. Little is known about his early life other than the fact that he [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Somerset Place
by Powell, William S. Somerset Place by William S. Powell, 2006 Somerset Place is located in Washington County seven miles south of Creswell on Lake Phelps. Originally consisting of more than 100,000 acres, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
State v. John Mann
by Brinkley, Martin H. State v. John Mann by Martin H. Brinkley, 2006 State v. John Mann, an 1829 North Carolina Supreme Court decision, is probably the most notorious judicial opinion on the relationship [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
State v. Negro Will
by Brinkley, Martin H. State v. Negro Will by Martin H. Brinkley, 2006 See also: State v. John Mann. State v. Negro Will, a celebrated 1834 North Carolina Supreme Court decision standing for the general [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
State v. Worth
by Stoesen, Alexander R. State v. Worth by Alexander R. Stoesen, 2006 See also: Daniel Worth (Dictionary of North Carolina Biography), Impending Crisis of the South; Walker's Appeal. Daniel Worth, a Wesleyan [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
The Freedmen's Colony on Roanoke Island
by . Roanoke Island was the setting for an historic experiment during the Civil War. Following the island’s occupation by Union forces in 1862, it became a haven for African-American families from [...] (from National Park Service.)
The Quakers and Their War of Resistance
by Bates, Doris McLean. The Quakers and Their War of Resistence By Doris McLean Bates Reprinted with permission from the Tar Heel Junior Historian, Fall 2000. Tar Heel Junior Historian Association, NC Museum of [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Thirteenth Amendment
by Alexander, Roberta Sue. Thirteenth Amendment by Roberta Sue Alexander, 2006 The Thirteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, sent to the states for ratification in February 1865 with the unanimous support of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
United States Colored Troops: Fighting for Freedom
by Haley, John H. United States Colored Troops: Fighting for Freedom By John H. Haley, PhD Reprinted with permission from the Tar Heel Junior Historian 50:2 (spring [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Walker's Appeal
by Powell, William S. Walker's Appeal, actually titled Appeal to the Coloured Citizens of the World, was an emotionally charged, powerful antislavery pamphlet published by black Wilmington native David Walker in September [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Walker, Carleton
by Engstrom, Mary Claire. Carleton Walker, British-born collector of the Port of Wilmington, paymaster of troops in the War of 1812, and Cape Fear planter and lavish speculator, was the youngest of three sons of James (d. [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Walker, David
by Inscoe, John C. David Walker, black author of an incendiary antislavery pamphlet, was born in Wilmington to a free mother and a slave father who died before his birth. Despite his free status inherited from his [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Women of Somerset Place
by Sykes, John. Women of Somerset Place by John Sykes Reprinted with permission from the Tar Heel Junior Historian, Spring 1994. Tar Heel Junior Historian Association, NC Museum of History Somerset Place, [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Woodward, Sara Griffith Stanley
by Powell, William S. Woodward, Sara Griffith Stanley by William S. Powell, 1994 Related Entries: African American 1836–1918 Sara Griffith Stanley Woodward, anti-slavery activist and teacher and one of the [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
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