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Food and drink
Bradham, Caleb Davis
by Copeland, Elizabeth H. Caleb Davis Bradham, founder of Pepsi-Cola, pharmacist, and Shriner, was born at Chinquapin, Duplin County, the son of George Washington and Julia McCann Bradham. He was of English and Scotch-Irish [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Breads
by Norris, David A., Mills, Jerry Leath, Wright, Marilyn. Breads of various types have been essential elements of the foodways of North Carolinians since long before European settlement. Corn was the base ingredient for North Carolina's earliest Indian [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Buttermilk
by Masci, Athena. Buttermilk, the liquid left when milk or cream is churned into butter, has long added to the richness of North Carolina cuisine. It is the essential ingredient in the buttermilk biscuit-a southern [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Calabash
by Barefoot, Daniel W. Calabash is a fishing and resort town situated on the Calabash River in southwestern Brunswick County. Dubbed the "Seafood Capital of the World" by a food editor of the New York Times, the small town [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Cheerwine
by McGrath, Eileen. In 1913 L. D. Peeler and several other investors in Salisbury purchased stock in the Kentucky-based Mint-Cola Bottling Company, and Peeler started the local bottling franchise of the company. When [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Chinquapin
by Southern, David. Chinquapin, or "chinkapin," is a diminutive cousin of the American chestnut. Although their name derives from eastern-dwelling Algonquian Indian language, chinquapin trees are known as far west as [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Church Homecomings
by Stoesen, Alexander R. Church homecomings have been held in North Carolina since colonial times, offering people a sense of communal pride, renewal, shared history, and fellowship with other church members and with God. [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Collards
by Albright, Alex. Collards, also called collard greens or simply "greens," grow throughout the South and probably as much as any food delineate the culinary boundaries of the Mason-Dixon Line. Sometimes defined as [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Commercial Fishing
by Stick, David, Carter, Kathy. Fishing for both finfish and shellfish has long been an important source of income throughout the coastal area of North Carolina. The state's relative isolation from major markets, the absence of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Cooking in the 1800s (from Tar Heel Junior Historian)
by Hybarger, Courtney. Cooking in the 1800s Originally published as "When Dinner Wasn’t Quick and Easy" By Courtney Hybarger Reprinted with permission from Tar Heel Junior Historian, Spring 2007. Tar Heel Junior [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)

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