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African and African American Storytelling
by Wilson, Madafo Lloyd. African and African American Storytelling By Madafo Lloyd Wilson Reprinted with permission from the Tar Heel Junior Historian, Spring 2002. Tar Heel Junior Historian Association, NC Museum of [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Archaeology Part 1: Archaeological Research in the Coastal Plain
by Freeman, Joan E., Davis, R. P. Stephen, Jr., Lawrence, Richard W. Archaeology by Joan E. Freeman and R. P. Stephen Davis Jr., 2006. Additional research provided by Richard W. Lawrence. See also: American Indians; Archaeology of Early NC; Cherokee [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Archaeology Part 2: Discoveries of the North Carolina Piedmont
by Freeman, Joan E., Davis, R. P. Stephen, Jr., Lawrence, Richard W. Archaeology by Joan E. Freeman and R. P. Stephen Davis Jr., 2006. Additional research provided by Richard W. Lawrence. Part 1: Archaeological Research in the Coastal Plain; Part 2: [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Archaeology Part 4: Underwater Archaeology
by Freeman, Joan E., Davis, R. P. Stephen, Jr., Lawrence, Richard W. Archaeology by Joan E. Freeman and R. P. Stephen Davis Jr., 2006. Additional research provided by Richard W. Lawrence. Part 1: Archaeological Research in the Coastal Plain; Part 2: [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Azalea Festival
by Stinson, Craig M. The North Carolina Azalea Festival is held every April in Wilmington as a celebration of the beauty of the abundant azalea flowers in the vicinity. In the 1930s Houston Moore, interested in the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Ballad of Tom Dooley
by Mitchell, Thornton W. Thomas C. Dula was born in Wilkes County on 20 June 1844, the son of Mary Dula. In 1862 he enlisted in the 42nd Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, as a private. Dula was captured at Kinston and was a [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Barbers
by Powell, William S. By the time North Carolina was colonized, the French custom of having barbers do surgery was never practiced in the colonies. Striped barber poles were abandoned, only to be revived by the appearance [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Bathing
by Powell, William S. Bathing, for most North Carolinians until the twentieth century, was an irregular practice often regarded as unhealthy. William Byrd's "secret history" of the surveying of the dividing line between [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Beauty Shops
by Fick, Virginia Gunn. Beauty shops, or beauty parlors, have had a notable impact on the lives of North Carolina women since the early twentieth century. Cosmetologists delivered more than better looks; they became [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Beer and Breweries
by Campbell, Karl E. The brewing of beer in the region that would become North Carolina began long before the first Europeans arrived. According to John Lawson's A New Voyage to Carolina (1709), Native Americans made [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Blue Laws
by Williams, Wiley J. "Blue laws" refer to statutes designed to enforce morality as some lawmakers understand it, such as restricting the hours that stores can open on Sundays or the sale of alcoholic beverages. The term [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Blues
by Holden, Charles J., Baker, Bruce E. North Carolina boasts significant contributions to the musical tradition known as the blues. Throughout its formative decades, the blues was the music of solo artists rather than groups, with the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Buck Dancing
by Baker, Bruce E. Buck Dancing by Bruce E. Baker, 2006 See also: Clogging; Step Dancing. Buck dancing is a folk dance that originated among African Americans during the era of slavery. It was largely [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
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