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Comments

Comment: 

Greetings, we are from Puerto Rico, my son is in the sixth grade and he has to do a North Carolina project. He needs the shield and the flag with its meaning. The Anthem with its author. The food and typical dress among other things. They would be so kind to tell me where I can get this information.
Thanks

Comment: 

Dear Catiria,

Thank you for visiting NCpedia for your son’s project.

I’m going to pull up some resources to get you started.

  • Here is an NCpedia article about the history of the State Flag: https://www.ncpedia.org/symbols/flag
  • Article on the State Seal: https://www.ncpedia.org/symbols/seal
  • For food and dress – is there a particular time period or community that he needs to research?  Please let me know and we’ll try to find more resources. You can also search in the “Search NCpedia” box (on all pages in the upper right corner). NCpedia search works the same as Google search – you can type keywords and get search results. The results have a little snippet of article text so you can scan to see if something looks relevant.
  • Here are search results for “food” (you don’t need quotation marks when you search, however): https://www.ncpedia.org/gsearch?query=food.  You see a number of entries that talk about food historically, including food for the areas indigenous peoples.

And here are search results for “dress” -- https://www.ncpedia.org/gsearch?query=dress

I hope this helps!  Please let me know if you need additional help or something different.

Best wishes,
Kelly Agan, Government & Heritage Library
 

Comment: 

I have a battle flag it's the NC13th regiment I was wondering if anyone could tell me someone or somewhere I could find out information on it, its in pretty good shape,I just don't know if it's a replica or not. Any information would be greatly appreciated. I was hoping to be able to add a picture to this comment but it wouldn't let me.

Comment: 

Hello,
I am searching for a likeness of John Johnston [d. abt. 1791] who was the younger brother of NC governor Sam Johnston, and brother in law of James Iredell, the first Chief Justice of NC Supreme Court. I provide these specifics as to whom John Johnston was related to in order to help separate this John Johnston from others of the same name. This John Johnston died before he could reach the heights of elite status of other Johnston family kin, but he won a very important case that I have been researching in NC. Any help that you can provide in locating a likeness of him [or a contact who might know] would be greatly appreciated.

Dan Daily

Comment: 

I am originally from Faison NC and have always known about an area referred to as " the old mill." However no one seems to know it's origin. Can you advise me regarding how to research this topic?

Comment: 

Dear Mr. Bailey,

Thank you for your question. Could you be referring to the Old Mill Swamp? Here is a very short entry from the NC Gazetteer that references the Old Mill Swamp in Sampson County:

https://www.ncpedia.org/gazetteer/search/old%20mill%20swamp/0

Here is some additional information about that area:

https://northcarolina.hometownlocator.com/maps/feature-map,ftc,1,fid,102...

http://www.lat-long.com/Latitude-Longitude-1025593-North_Carolina-Old_Mi...

I hope this is helpful.

Mike Millner, NC Government & Heritage Library

Comment: 

if you have any imformaiton about the history of chapel hill i would love it i love chapel hill also i want information about luke maye on the carolina tarheels basket ball team thank you

Comment: 

Hi! Thanks for using NCpedia! Here are a couple of links that might help:

http://www.townofchapelhill.org/residents/about-chapel-hill/history

http://goheels.com/roster.aspx?rp_id=12062

If you need additional information, you may want to contact the library at UNC (https://library.unc.edu/) or the town of Chapel Hill (https://chapelhillpubliclibrary.org/). Thanks so much for using NCpedia! - Michelle Underhill

Comment: 

Yesterday the sermon was given by Sharon Kniss as our Peace Sunday guest. She is a peace-building practitioner and trainer currently serving as the Director of Education and Training at the Kansas Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution
(KIPCOR).
She is passionate about working with diverse groups and individuals in their search for more peaceful communities. Her message on Peacebuilding: A Journey of Proximity had a real connection with G. Ray Jordon's book, Beyond Despair: When Religion Becomes Real (esp. pages 72 and 149ff). Instead of finding people who think alike, Sharon Kniss is intent on having dinners with extremists who are different from herself.

Comment: 

I have the death certificate for my step-grandfather. He died at "State Hospital, Butner, NC" and his occupation was listed as "inmate". Was he an actual inmate at a prison, or was this the term in which was used for patients at this facility in 1954? Is there anywhere I can get more info on this facility via the internet? Thanks.

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