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Comment: 

Yesterday the sermon was given by Sharon Kniss as our Peace Sunday guest. She is a peace-building practitioner and trainer currently serving as the Director of Education and Training at the Kansas Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution
(KIPCOR).
She is passionate about working with diverse groups and individuals in their search for more peaceful communities. Her message on Peacebuilding: A Journey of Proximity had a real connection with G. Ray Jordon's book, Beyond Despair: When Religion Becomes Real (esp. pages 72 and 149ff). Instead of finding people who think alike, Sharon Kniss is intent on having dinners with extremists who are different from herself.

Comment: 

I have the death certificate for my step-grandfather. He died at "State Hospital, Butner, NC" and his occupation was listed as "inmate". Was he an actual inmate at a prison, or was this the term in which was used for patients at this facility in 1954? Is there anywhere I can get more info on this facility via the internet? Thanks.

Comment: 

Dear Cindy,

Thank you for visiting NCpedia and sharing your question.

I have looked at a number of resources, including reports of the NC State Board of Health for the period of the 1950s and the term "inmate" was a term used to describe patients at the state hospital and other similar facilities in the state.  

There are a number of places that you can find information about the State Hospital in Butner (known as John Umstead Hospital):

NCpedia has a number of articles about the state hospitals in NC:

http://www.ncpedia.org/gsearch?query=state+hospital

http://www.ncpedia.org/psychiatric-hospitals

Print publications about John Umstead Hospital: These resources are found through a search of WorldCat which is online catalog that searches holdings of libraries around the world. You can see if a particular item is located in a library near you or if your local library may be able to obtain an item through interlibrary loan:

https://www.worldcat.org/search?qt=worldcat_org_all&q=john+umstead+hospital

There is one particular resource that may be of interest as a history:

The Plowshare: John Umstead Hospital 25th anniversary. 1972. Butner, N.C.: John Umstead Hospital. http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/16411488.  

I see that there are two libraries that have this resource -- Duke University and the University of North Carolina.  If you are interested in this resource, you may be able to request it through interlibrary loan.

Reports of the state board of health (and related departments) are available online in the NC Digital Collections. Various annual reports include general and annual statistical information about the institutions:

https://goo.gl/N8d7MT

If there is a specific aspect of the history that you are interested in, please let us know and we will try to help locate additional information.

I hope this helps. Please let us know if you have additional questions.

Best wishes,

Kelly Agan, NC Government & Heritate Library

Comment: 

Thank you very much for this information. It is very helpful. If I run into anymore questions I will be sure to ask you all again.
Cindy

Comment: 

Dear Cindy,

Thank you for visiting NCpedia and sharing your question.

I have looked at a number of resources, including reports of the NC State Board of Health for the period of the 1950s and the term "inmate" was a term used to describe patients at the state hospital and other similar facilities in the state.  

There are a number of places that you can find information about the State Hospital in Butner (known as John Umstead Hospital):

NCpedia has a number of articles about the state hospitals in NC:

http://www.ncpedia.org/gsearch?query=state+hospital

http://www.ncpedia.org/psychiatric-hospitals

Print publications about John Umstead Hospital: These resources are found through a search of WorldCat which is online catalog that searches holdings of libraries around the world. You can see if a particular item is located in a library near you or if your local library may be able to obtain an item through interlibrary loan:

https://www.worldcat.org/search?qt=worldcat_org_all&q=john+umstead+hospital

There is one particular resource that may be of interest as a history:

The Plowshare: John Umstead Hospital 25th anniversary. 1972. Butner, N.C.: John Umstead Hospital. http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/16411488.  

I see that there are two libraries that have this resource -- Duke University and the University of North Carolina.  If you are interested in this resource, you may be able to request it through interlibrary loan.

Reports of the state board of health (and related departments) are available online in the NC Digital Collections. Various annual reports include general and annual statistical information about the institutions:

https://goo.gl/N8d7MT

If there is a specific aspect of the history that you are interested in, please let us know and we will try to help locate additional information.

I hope this helps. Please let us know if you have additional questions.

Best wishes,

Kelly Agan, NC Government & Heritate Library

Comment: 

Halo! I Just Want to give a big thumbs up to review your info, memorable once your writing. I'll Come Back To blog Anda for a review Quick MORE.

Comment: 

trying to find out when the gas tax was 13.25 cents a gallon any help please

Comment: 

Dear Richard,

Thank you for visiting NCpedia and taking time to share your question.

If you are looking for information about North Carolina's gas tax, here is a link to a page on the N.C. Department of Revenue with a list of motor vehicle gas tax rates from 1921 to the present: http://www.dor.state.nc.us/taxes/motor/rates.html

I hope this helps!

Best wishes,

Kelly Agan 

Comment: 

I am Curator of the Univ of NC Chapel Hill Herbarium and I am cataloging our fungal collection. I have a specimen collected by "C. J. Cowles, Wilkesboro, N.C." on July 23, 1900. This fungus is a parasite on corn, so of economic interest. As Ms. McGrew's very informative bio on CJ Cowles indicates, Cowles had wide-ranging interests... possibly extending to fungi.

Comment: 

What the heck?

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