Slogans, slang, and sayings

Slogans, slang, and sayings
Army Worm
by Powell, William S. Army Worm by William S. Powell, 2006 Army worm was the term applied to extortionists who followed the invading Federal army in the South during the Civil [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Beat the Bounds
by Powell, William S. To "beat the bounds," or "do procession," meant walking the boundaries of a property and, in ancient times, striking certain places with a rod in the presence of witnesses. In the American colonies, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Blind Tiger
by Powell, William S. "Blind tiger" was a term of unknown origin applied to establishments that sold liquor during Prohibition. Newspapers and other publications in North Carolina in the 1920s used it as a synonym for [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Buncombe
by Faulkner, Ronnie W. The word "Buncombe" has, along with its variations of "bunk" and "bunkum," entered American slang as a term synonymous with meaningless speech. The popular term for pretentious and nonsensical talk [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Carolana
by Butler, Lindley S. Carolana, "land of Charles," referred to the area south of Virginia granted on 30 Oct. 1629 by King Charles I to his attorney general, Sir Robert Heath. The grant was part of the Crown policy to [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Charlotte Three
by Powell, William S. Charlotte Three by William S. Powell, 2006 "Charlotte Three" was the term applied by journalists in the 1970s to James Grant, T. J. Reddy, and Charles Parker, African American civil rights [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
El brindis del estado
by . Extraído de Libro de hechos de El Viejo Estado del Norte. La propiedad literaria 2011 por la Oficina de Archivos e Historia de Carolina del Norte, Departamento de Recursos Culturale de [...] (from NC Office of Archives and History.)
El lema del estado
by . Extraído de Libro de hechos de El Viejo Estado del Norte. La propiedad literaria 2011 por la Oficina de Archivos e Historia de Carolina del Norte, Departamento de Recursos Culturale de [...] (from NC Office of Archives and History.)
Esse Quam Videri
by Barefoot, Daniel W. Esse Quam Videri, the state motto of North Carolina, is a Latin phrase meaning "to be rather than to seem." Its origins are traced to Cicero's essay titled "Friendship." Distinguished jurist and [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Factory Cord
by Powell, William S. Factory Cord is identified as any cord or string not of home manufacture but produced at a factory or mill. The term was used prior to the Civil War in Piedmont North Carolina, where there were early [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
First at Bethel, Farthest to the Front at Gettysburg and Chickamauga, and Last at Appomattox
by Poff, Jan-Michael. "First at Bethel, Farthest to the Front at Gettysburg and Chickamauga, and Last at Appomattox" is a traditional saying honoring the role of North Carolina's soldiers in the Civil War. Editor Walter [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
First in Freedom
by Orvedahl, Ginny. "First in Freedom" is a slogan referring to the action of an assembly of representatives in colonial North Carolina that adopted a nonimportation agreement on 2 Nov. 1769. This document "took [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Goodliest Soile under the Cope of Heaven
by Powell, William S. "Goodliest Soile under the Cope of Heaven" by William S. Powell, 2006 "Goodliest Soile under the Cope of Heaven" is the phrase used by Ralph Lane, leader of one [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Graveyard of the Atlantic
by Stick, David. Graveyard of the Atlantic by David Stick, 2006 See also: Huron, USS; Mirlo Rescue; [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Integral Society
by Powell, William S. "Integral society" was a descriptive term for the objective of royal governor Arthur Dobbs (1754-65) to alleviate the problem of unsatisfactory race relations between the English and the native [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
It's a Damn Long Time between Drinks
by Mills, Jerry Leath. "It's a Damn Long Time between Drinks" is the famous statement allegedly made by North Carolina governor John Motley Morehead during a tense visit from South Carolina governor James H. Hammond in the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
La academia militar oficial
by . Extraído de Libro de hechos de El Viejo Estado del Norte. La propiedad literaria 2011 por la Oficina de Archivos e Historia de Carolina del Norte, Departamento de Recursos Culturale de [...] (from NC Office of Archives and History.)
La canción del estado
by . Extraído de Libro de hechos de El Viejo Estado del Norte. La propiedad literaria 2011 por la Oficina de Archivos e Historia de Carolina del Norte, Departamento de Recursos Culturale de [...] (from NC Office of Archives and History.)
Land of the Sky
by Williams, Wiley J. "Land of the Sky" is a slogan applied to the Mountain region of western North Carolina. It was adopted from the title of a novel, "The Land of the Sky"; or, Adventures in Mountain By-Ways (1876), [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Manteo to Murphy
by Williams, Wiley J. "Manteo to Murphy" is a phrase often used in reference to the entire east-west width of North Carolina, particularly when describing a phenomenon that touches all regions of the state. The phrase was [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Messuage
by Powell, William S. "Messuage" was a term not widely used in North Carolina, although it appears occasionally in deeds and wills. It refers to the residence or dwelling house, outbuildings, supporting structures, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Mosquito Fleet
by Barrett, John G. The Mosquito Fleet was the whimsical nickname for the four small steamers that comprised the North Carolina Navy at the beginning of the Civil War. The ships were under orders not only to defend [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Name (Carolina) and Nicknames (The Old North State or The Tar Heel State)
by Case, Steven. In 1629, King Charles I granted territory in America to his Attorney General, Sir Robert Heath, to be named Carolina, or the province of Carolina (though later in the same charter the province is [...] (from Government & Heritage Library, State Library of North Carolina.)
Nature's Sample Case
by Coffin, Alex. "Nature's sample case" has long been a term applied to North Carolina because of its more than 300 native rocks and minerals, such as iron, limestone, gold, emeralds, sapphires, and moonstones. More [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Nombres del estado y apodos
by . Extraído de Libro de hechos de El Viejo Estado del Norte. La propiedad literaria 2011 por la Oficina de Archivos e Historia de Carolina del Norte, Departamento de Recursos Culturale de [...] (from NC Office of Archives and History.)
Ould Virginia
by Dough, Wynne. "Ould Virginia" as a term enjoyed brief currency in the seventeenth century as a name for territory south of the Chesapeake Bay covered by Sir Walter Raleigh's 1584 patent of discovery. John Smith [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Rip Van Winkle State
by Williams, Wiley J. The "Rip Van Winkle State" was the derogatory nickname given North Carolina in the early decades of the nineteenth century. From 1815 to 1835, the state was deemed to be so undeveloped, backward, and [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Road to Nowhere
by Hegyi, Laura. The "Road to Nowhere" is the droll nickname of an unfinished six-mile stretch of highway that is the result of an unfulfilled promise by the U.S. government to a small community in Swain County. The [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Rogue's Harbor
by Baxley, Laura Young. "Rogue's Harbor" was an insulting nickname assigned to the Albemarle region of the colony of North Carolina by Virginia officials. The nickname, along with other derogatory labels, suggested that the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Southern Part of Heaven
by Mills, Jerry Leath. The "Southern Part of Heaven" is a phrase coined by author William Meade Prince in 1950 for the title of his volume of reminiscences of growing up in Chapel Hill. Prince was drawing on an old, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Tar Heel
by Taylor, Michael W. "Tar Heel" is the nickname for a native or resident of North Carolina as well as for the state itself, which is known as the Tar Heel State. The term appears to have come into popular use after the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Vale of Humility between Two Mountains of Conceit
by Powell, William S. "Vale of Humility between Two Mountains of Conceit" is a phrase describing North Carolina that originated from a speech given by Mary Oates Spratt Van Landingham on 6 Mar. 1900. That day, she spoke [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
White Trash
by Williams, Wiley J. "White trash," or "poor white trash," was a term designating the lowest social class among whites in antebellum North Carolina. Other derogatory names for this group included "rednecks," "crackers," [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Yellow-Dog Democrat
by Isenbarger, Dennis. "Yellow-Dog Democrat," a popular term sometimes applied to ultra-loyal supporters of Democratic candidates for public office, came into use in the third decade of the twentieth century. In 1928 [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
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