Bill Clinton (1946-    )

Bill Clinton was the 42nd president of the United States from 1993-2001. Clinton was born in Hope, Arkansas in August 19, 1946. Clinton's political beginnings are found in his high school years when he went to the White House as a delegate for Boys Nation. There he met President John Kennedy. Clinton would later earn a law degree from Yale in 1973. Clinton continued to build his political career through local government, and then set his eye for presidency in 1992. Like many presidents, Clinton's presidency had its ups and downs, such as, achieving a budget surplus and his issue with Monica Lewinsky.

To find out more about Bill Clinton follow these links:

https://www.whitehouse.gov/about-the-white-house/presidents/william-j-cl...

https://millercenter.org/president/clinton/life-before-the-presidency

https://www.clintonlibrary.gov/museum/permanentexhibits/

<img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://statelibrarync.org/learnnc/sites/default/files/images/bill_clinton.jpg" width="700" height="913" />
Citation (Chicago Style): 

McNeely, Bob. [Official White House photo of President Bill Clinton, President of the United States]. 1993. Digital Image. Wikimedia Commons. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:44_Bill_Clinton_3x4.jpg (Accessed December 17, 2018).

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