A Compleat map of North-Carolina from an actual survey

This image is an excerpt of "A Compleat map of North-Carolina from an actual survey," created by John Collett, J. Bayly, and Samuel Hooper, and published in London, England in 1770. The entire map is 27 inches by 42 inches and shows the entire North Carolina colony, as known at the time. This excerpt shows the "horseshoe" portion of the Deep River where Philip Alston had his home in the southern bend. On the map this location is inside the "u" of the river to the left of the words "Governors Creek". The northern section of the bend, above Governor's Creek, is nearby and in the general location of Carbonton, the area where Loyalist Connor Dowd had his mills, tannery, and distillery. Click here to see the entire, larger map: https://dc.lib.unc.edu/cdm/ref/collection/ncmaps/id/467

This image is an excerpt of "A Compleat map of North-Carolina from an actual survey," created by John Collett, J. Bayly, and Samuel Hooper, 1770. It was published in London, England. This excerpt shows the "horseshoe" portion of the Deep River where Philip Alston had his home. The northern section of the bend, above Governor's Creek, is the location of Carbonton, the area where Loyalist Connor Dowd had his mills, tannery, and distillery.
Citation (Chicago Style): 

Collet, John, J. Bayly, and Samuel Hooper. A Compleat map of North-Carolina from an actual survey. 70 x 107 cm. London: S. Hooper, 1770. North Carolina Maps, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. https://dc.lib.unc.edu/cdm/singleitem/collection/ncmaps/id/467/rec/3

 

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