Tray filled with military badges and other artifacts from the Vietnam wars

Tray filled with military badges and other artifacts from the Vietnam wars

A square wooden tray is filled with military badges and other artifacts left from the Vietnam wars. Visible in the tray are metal badges from U.S., French, and Vietnamese soldiers, U.S. "dog tags" used for personal identification, silverware, a pocket knife, a razor, a string of old Chinese coins with holes in the center, and two wild animal tusks.

Most of the metal items were lost by U.S. or French soldiers, but Vietnamese soldiers would have owned the small Vietnamese flag lapel pins, the antique Chinese coins (valued throughout Southeast Asia), and the animal tusks. In many parts of Southeast Asia, crocodile, wild cat, and boar tusks are valued for warrior's amulets or sometimes for medicinal ingredients. These items were seen (and probably were for sale) in the former Demilitarized Zone (or DMZ) near central Vietnam's 17th parallel line.

<img typeof="foaf:Image" src="http://statelibrarync.org/learnnc/sites/default/files/images/vietnam_084.jpg" width="683" height="1024" alt="Tray filled with military badges and other artifacts from the Vietnam wars" title="Tray filled with military badges and other artifacts from the Vietnam wars" />
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