Annie Carter Lee Monument

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Monument of Anne Carter Lee

Annie Carter Lee Monument
Warrenton
View complete article and references at Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina at: http://docsouth.unc.edu/commland/monument/93

Description: The granite obelisk stands 11 feet tall. It is 2 feet wide at the base and 1 foot wide near the top, with a curved, reverse bell pointed top. It commemorates the life of Annie Carter Lee, daughter of General Robert E. Lee. The idea and production of the monument came soon after General Lee's surrender to General Ulysses S. Grant in 1865.

Inscription:
ANNE C. LEE, DAUGHTER OF GENERAL R. E. LEE, AND MARY CUSTIS LEE / BORN AT ARLINGTON, JUNE 18TH, 1839 AND DIED AT THE WHITE SULPHUR SPRINGS, WARREN COUNTY, N. C., OCTOBER 20TH, 1862. / PERFECT AND TRUE ARE ALL HIS WAYS / WHOM HEAVEN ADORES AND EARTH OBEYS.


Dedication date: August 8, 1866

Creator: Zearell Crowder, Sculptor

Materials & Techniques: Granite

Sponsor: The family of Robert E. Lee. The people of Warren county also raised $1,000 in support of erecting the monument.

Unveiling & Dedication: Captain James Barron Hope, of Norfolk, Virginia, wrote an ode for the unveiling. Representatives of Annie's Lee's family included Generals G. W. C. Lee and W. F. Lee, although her father, General Robert E. Lee, was not present.

Post dedication use: Robert E. Lee visited the Annie Carter Lee monument in 1870 without warning any local residents of his intent. It became a point of pride to North Carolina chapters of the Sons of Confederate Veterans who attempted to stop the body's removal. After learning of the family's intent to re-inter the body, funds were raised to repair the damage done by vandals in an attempt to convince the family not to remove the body. However, the family eventually moved the body to Virginia where they felt it would be better looked after.

Subject notes: Annie Carter Lee was one of Confederate General Robert E. Lee's four daughters. Suffering from a disfigured eye, she was shy and spent most of her life with family. When Union troops occupied the Lee family home in Arlington, VA, in June 1862, Annie and her sister Agnes were sent to Jones Springs (also called White Sulphur Springs) outside of Warrenton, NC; it was a well-known resort at the time. Annie died a few months later of typhoid fever. Because taking her body back to Arlington would require crossing Union lines, the owner of Jones Springs offered his family's cemetery for Annie to be buried; the family gratefully accepted. A Confederate soldier created the obelisk and placed it at her grave in her honor.

Controversies: In 1994 after learning that the monument had been damaged by vandals, the Lee family requested the body be moved to the Lee family crypt in Virginia. Local chapters of the Sons of Confederate Veterans and the Military Order of the Stars and Bars attempted to convince the family to leave the body where it was, citing the fact that Robert E. Lee had approved of the location in 1870 when he visited. Though obelisk was eventually repaired , the family still choose to move the body.

Former Locations: The monument has not been relocated. However, the body of the girl it commemorates was moved in 1994, when Lee's descendents decided to move Annie's body to the Lee family burial site in Lexington, VA; the original grave the obelisk marks is now empty. Local chapters of the Sons of Confederate Veterans attempted to convince the family to leave the body where it was.

Landscape: The monument is located at the Jones family cemetery, where the family of the owner of Jones Springs is buried. It is on a dirt road off of US 401 named Annie Lee Road in her memory.

City: Warrenton

County: Warren

Subjects: Historic Women Figures

Latitude: 
36.28225
Longitude: 
-78.2366
Subjects: 
Origin - location: 

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