Copyright notice

This article is from the Encyclopedia of North Carolina edited by William S. Powell. Copyright © 2006 by the University of North Carolina Press. Used by permission of the publisher. For personal use and not for further distribution. Please submit permission requests for other use directly to the publisher.

Printer-friendly page

Tomato Clubs

by Marilyn Wright, 2006McFarlan Club girls, Anson County, picking cotton, 1927. Image courtesy of North Carolina State University Libraries Special Collections Research Center.

Tomato clubs, promoting the involvement of young girls in finding ways to increase the production of agricultural crops, were started by the North Carolina Department of Agriculture in 1911 at the prompting of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Each tomato club member was challenged to grow and can as many tomatoes as she could on one-tenth of an acre of land. Girls in Guilford County started tomato clubs through the efforts of educator Jane S. McKimmon, who held canning club "short courses" at Elon College and Peace Institute, teaching the proper methods of sterilizing and sealing cans. By 1916 thousands of cans of tomatoes and other foods had been produced. McKimmon's efforts eventually led to a vigorous network of 4-H Clubs across the state.

 

Additional Resources:

Tomato Clubs, The History of Home Demonstration and 4-H Youth Development in NC, North Carolina State University: http://www.lib.ncsu.edu/specialcollections/greenngrowing/essay_tomato_clubs.html

Finding Aid of the Jane S. McKimmon Papers, North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources, Office of Archives & History

Image Credit:

McFarlan Club girls, Anson County, picking cotton, 1927. Image courtesy of North Carolina State University Libraries Special Collections Research Center. Available from http://d.lib.ncsu.edu/collections/catalog/0001052 (accessed August 28, 2012).

Authors: 
Origin - location: 

Add a comment

PLEASE NOTE: NCpedia provides the comments feature as a way for viewers to engage with the resources. Comments are not published until reviewed by NCpedia editors at the State Library of NC, and the editors reserve the right to not publish any comment submitted that is considered inappropriate for this resource. NCpedia will not publish personal contact information in comments, questions, or responses. If you would like a reply by email, note that some email servers, such as public school accounts, are blocked from accepting messages from outside email servers or domains. If you prefer not to leave an email address, check back at your NCpedia comment for a reply. Please allow one business day for replies from NCpedia. Complete guidelines are available at https://ncpedia.org/about.