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This article is from the Encyclopedia of North Carolina edited by William S. Powell. Copyright © 2006 by the University of North Carolina Press. Used by permission of the publisher. For personal use and not for further distribution. Please submit permission requests for other use directly to the publisher.

North Carolina Military Installations - Civil War

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Camps

Name
Location
Description
Camp Advance Near Weldon (Halifax County) Confederate training ground for Company H, 40th North Carolina Regiment (Heavy Artillery).
Camp Alamance Company Shops (now Burlington, Alamance County) Confederate organization point for Company F (Hawfield River Boys), 6th North Carolina Regiment.
Camp Ashe 12 miles east of Wilmington (now Scotts Hill, Pender County) Established by the 8th Regiment May 1863; part of the Confederate defense system protecting the port of Wilmington from northeast land invasion and the sound areas from Union warships.
Camp Baker Near Hamilton (Martin County) Primary headquarters of the 70th North Carolina Regiment (1st Junior Reserves), which defended several eastern counties from further Union invasion. Named for Brig. Gen. Lawrence S. Baker.
Camp Beauregard Ridgeway (Warren County) Established in May 1861 by Governor John W. Ellis as the first Confederate cavalry training ground in the state. The 1st North Carolina Cavalry Regiment (9th North Carolina Regiment) trained here, later winning one of the first cavalry encounters of the war in Vienna, Va. Named for Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard, who had earlier directed the capture of Fort Sumter.
Camp Black Jack Near Moseley Hall (now LaGrange, Lenoir County) Temporary Confederate camp established in June 1862 by the 52nd North Carolina Regiment to protect the Atlantic & North Carolina Railroad.
Camp Boylan Raleigh (Wake County) Confederate training ground of the Ellis Light Infantry and later (1862) the 49th North Carolina Regiment, commanded by Maj. Stephen D. Ramseur. Named for William Boylan, who provided the land.
Camp Campbell Near Cork Creek, south of Kinston (Lenoir County) One of several Confederate camps and picket posts guarding the area between Kinston and New Bern, occupied in the fall of 1862 by the 8th Regiment.
Camp Canal Near the Carteret County--Craven County line (north of Morehead City) Established in October 1861 by William A. Herring's Confederate artillery company (1st Company I, 36th North Carolina Regiment) to guard the Clubfoot and Harlow Creek Canal and the road between Beaufort and Adams Creek.
Camp Clarendon Garysburg (Northampton County) One of several unofficial names for the Confederate camp of instruction where the 3rd North Carolina Regiment formed and trained, June 1861.
Camp Clingman Asheville (Buncombe County) Confederate organization and training ground of the Twentieth Battalion, Junior Reserves. Named for Gen. Thomas L. Clingman, an antebellum political leader and Civil War officer.
Camp Cobb Near Wilmington (New Hanover County) Confederate camp that provided housing for recruits and troops stationed in batteries and forts defending Wilmington, the Cape Fear River, and Fort Fisher. Likely named for Gen. Howell Cobb, secretary of the treasury under President James Buchanan.
Camp Collier Near Goldsboro (Wayne County) Confederate camp briefly used by the 61st North Carolina Regiment en route to Kinston from the Wilmington area, October 1862.
Camp Crabtree Near Raleigh (Wake County) Confederate training ground (also known as Camp Carolina) established in July 1861 and commanded by Maj. Henry K. Burgwyn Jr.
Camp Daniel Near Garysburg (Northampton County) Confederate camp of instruction used by the First Battalion of Junior Reserves in preparation for joining the Sixth Battalion of Junior Reserves to form the 70th North Carolina Regiment (1st Junior Reserves). Named for Brig. Gen. Junius Daniel of Halifax County.
Camp Davis Near Wilmington (New Hanover County) Confederate camp that provided housing for recruits and troops stationed in batteries and forts defending Wilmington, the Cape Fear River, and Fort Fisher.
Camp Fisher High Point (Guilford County) Established in the fall of 1861 as one of two Confederate infantry training camps in the county. Companies organized here include the 28th, 34th, and 37th North Carolina Regiments (1861) and the 11th North Carolina Regiment (1862). Named for Col. Charles F. Fisher, the second president of the North Carolina Railroad and a casualty at the First Battle of Manassas (Bull Run).
Camp Floyd Near Weldon (Halifax County) Confederate camp of instruction that was the temporary base of the 38th North Carolina Regiment in February 1862. Likely named for Maj. Gen. John B. Floyd, secretary of war under President James Buchanan.
Camp Hill Near Asheville (Buncombe County) Confederate camp that was the temporary base of the 39th North Carolina Regiment between November 1861 and February 1862. Named for Maj. Gen. Daniel H. Hill.
Camp Hill Near Garysburg (Northampton County) One of several unofficial names for the Confederate camp of instruction where the 4th North Carolina Regiment formed and trained in May 1861. The 42nd North Carolina Regiment was also stationed here in 1863. Named for Maj. Gen. Daniel H. Hill.
Camp Holmes Near Raleigh (Wake County) Confederate camp of instruction, training ground of the 72nd Regiment (3rd Junior Reserves). Likely named for Lt. Gen. Theophilus H. Holmes.
Camp Hopkins Near Wilmington (New Hanover County) Confederate camp that provided housing for recruits and troops stationed in batteries and forts defending Wilmington, the Cape Fear River, and Fort Fisher.
Camp Johnston Near Kinston (Lenoir County) Confederate camp occupied by the 52nd North Carolina Regiment in April 1862.
Camp Lamb Near Wilmington (New Hanover County) Confederate camp that provided housing for recruits and troops stationed in batteries and forts defending Wilmington, the Cape Fear River, and Fort Fisher. Named for Col. William Lamb, commander of Fort Fisher.
Camp Leventhorpe Near Garysburg (Northampton County) One of several unofficial names for the Confederate camp of instruction where the 38th North Carolina Regiment formed and trained in February 1862. Named for Brig. Gen. Collett Leventhorpe.
Camp Long Near Garysburg (Northampton County) One of several unofficial names for the Confederate camp of instruction where the 5th North Carolina Cavalry (63rd North Carolina Regiment) formed and trained in the fall of 1862. Named for Lt. Col. John O. Long.
Camp McLean Near Goldsboro (Wayne County) Temporary base of many Confederate units, including the 72nd North Carolina Regiment (3rd Junior Reserves), guarding rail and river approaches to Goldsboro. Likely named for Gen. A. D. McLean of Cumberland County.
Camp Macon Near Warrenton (Warren County) Confederate camp and site of organization of the 8th North Carolina Regiment. Likely named for Nathaniel Macon of Warren County.
Camp Mangum Raleigh (Wake County) Primary Confederate camp of instruction in North Carolina. Its commanders included Maj. Gens. Daniel H. Hill and Stephen D. Ramseur.
Camp Mason Near Graham (Alamance County) First military base of the 7th North Carolina Regiment, organized and mustered in August 1861.
Camp Mason Near Goldsboro (Wayne County) Temporary base of many Confederate units guarding rail and river approaches to Goldsboro.
Camp Patton Near Asheville (Buncombe County) Confederate camp of instruction where Capt. Robert B. Vance, commander of Company A, Buncombe Life Guards, stationed his company in the summer of 1861 before they joined the 29th North Carolina Regiment.
Camp Radcliffe Near Smithville (Brunswick County) Confederate camp established and occupied by the 61st North Carolina Regiment in the fall of 1862. Named for Col. James D. Radcliffe.
Camp Ransom Near Garysburg (Northampton County) One of several unofficial names for the Confederate camp of instruction used by the Sixth Battalion, Junior Reserves, while the unit joined the First Battalion, Junior Reserves, to form the 70th North Carolina Regiment (1st Junior Reserves). Likely named for Brig. Gen. Matthew W. Ransom.
Camp Vance Near Sulphur Springs (Buncombe County) Temporary duty station of the 29th North Carolina Regiment. Likely named in honor of Col. Zebulon B. Vance, the commander of the 26th North Carolina Regiment and later governor of North Carolina.
Camp Vance Berry's Mill Pond (6 miles from Morganton, Burke County) Training base for various regiments of Confederate Junior and Senior Reserves. Captured and destroyed in June 1864 by Col. George W. Kirk's 3rd North Carolina Mounted Infantry (Union).
Camp Vance Near Goldsboro (Wayne County) Temporary base of many Confederate units guarding rail and river approaches to Goldsboro.
Camp White Near Kinston (Lenoir County) Temporary base of the 7th North Carolina Regiment during the 1863 campaigns of Maj. Gen. Daniel H. Hill. Possibly named for Dr. W. E. White, the regiment's assistant surgeon.
Camp Whiting Near Wilmington (New Hanover County) Confederate camp that provided housing for recruits and troops stationed in batteries and forts defending Wilmington, the Cape Fear River, and Fort Fisher. Occupied by the 8th North Carolina Regiment, November--December 1862. Likely named for Maj. Gen. William H. C. Whiting.
Camp Winslow Near Wilmington (New Hanover County) Confederate camp that provided housing for recruits and troops stationed in batteries and forts defending Wilmington, the Cape Fear River, and Fort Fisher. Named for North Carolina governor Warren Winslow (died 1862).
Camp Woodfin Near Asheville (Buncombe County) First Confederate camp of instruction in western North Carolina. The 69th North Carolina Regiment, 8th Cavalry (Woodfin's Fourteenth Battalion) was raised here. Last camp in which the 64th North Carolina Regiment was stationed, April 1865. Named for John W. and Nicholas Woodfin, political and military leaders who donated the land.
Camp Wyatt South of Wilmington (New Hanover County) Temporary base of the 2nd North Carolina Regiment in the spring of 1862. Served as a hospital and supply point between Fort Fisher and Wilmington. Named for Pvt. Henry L. Wyatt of the 1st North Carolina (Bethel) Regiment, believed to have been the first Confederate soldier killed in action.

 

Resources:

Wiley, Bell Irvin. 1952. The life of Billy Yank: the common soldier of the Union. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill. 

Wiley, Bell Irvin. 1943. The life of Johnny Reb, the common soldier of the Confederacy. Indianapolis: Bobbs-Merrill. 

Anderson, Dale. 2004. A soldier's life in the Civil War. Milwaukee: World Almanac Library. 

Civil War Trust. Life of a Civil War Soldier in Camp. http://www.civilwar.org/hallowed-ground-magazine/winter-2013/life-of-the....

Comments

Comment: 

I’m gathering material for a book about two of my grandfathers who were members of the 28th NC Regiment. Following “boot camp” at Camp Fisher in High Point, they traveled by rail to Wilmington, arriving there in October 1, 1861, and establed what was later named Camp Lamb. Do you know if a better location, other than Wilmington, New Hanover County exists for the Camp Lamb and whether any photos exist? Anxiously await your reply.

Comment: 

Do you have any information regarding the 26th North Carolina at Camp Crabtree's exact location? Thanks,

Nah Dee

Comment: 

Hello,

According to "North Carolina Troops, 1861-1865: A Roster" v. 7 page 455, the 26th Regiment was organized at Camp Crabtree 3 miles west of Raleigh on August 27, 1861. From my own research on Raleigh City Directories, which began in 1875, the city consisted of what is now the downtown area of the city. 3 miles west of where exactly, I'm not sure. The city in 1875 started on Peace Street and went southward downtown towards what is today the town of Garner. Further on page 455, it says the regiment left Raleigh on September 2nd of that same year and went to Morehead City and then on to Bogue Banks to Camp Burgwyn, which was 4 miles from Fort Macon. Hope this helps!

Erin Bradford, Government and Heritage Library

Comment: 

Are any of the civil war camps available for visitation like one would visit the Forts? We visited Fort Fisher a few years back and fell in love with all of the forts . Thank you

Comment: 

Dear Ms. Anthony,

That is an excellent question. I was not able to find information about whether these camps still exist or can be visited. I think the best course of action would be to click on link in the "Location" column, which will take you NCpedia page for that county. From that NCpedia county page, click on the link in the box on the right side of the page: that will take you to the county's own web page. There you will find contact information that will hopefully put you in touch with someone who can provide you with accurate information about these camps. 

Best of luck in your search!

Mike Millner, NC Government & Heritage Library

Comment: 

Were there any known camps near what is now called Siler City?

Comment: 

Please provide info re Camp Oliver, in general, occupied by the 25th Massachusetts Inf Regt after the Battle of New Bern, 14 Mar 1862, and its location, specifically.

Comment: 

Do you have any information regarding the name and location of a confederate camp located at Magnolia in Duplin County? I have located copies of letters from soldiers at this camp but they do not provide any information other that stating they are at the Town of Magnolia. Thanks.

Comment: 

Dear Mr. Wadsworth,

Thank you for this interesting question. 

The book Duplin County Places has an entry called "Magnolia Bridge" (pp. 113-114) which says that "During the Civil War, Confederate troops were stationed for a time at a place called Magnolia Bridge. The exact location of the camp is not given in the official records. However, it is possible that this early bridge and camp site was near the area where the road from Magnolia to Kenansville (now SR 1003) crossed Maxwell Creek. It is about 2 miles east of Magnolia and is the largest branch or creek in the area. In a report from Major General John G. Foster of the U.S. Army, dated 7 July 1863, he stated that he was in Warsaw on 5 July 1863, and referred to '. . . four companies of infantry and four pieces of artillery stationed at Magnolia Bridge, a station 10 miles below. . . .'"

I hope this is helpful. You may also find this page on the Cape Fear Historical Institute site to be interesting.

Thank you.

Mike Millner, NC Government & Heritage Library

 

Comment: 

Camp Burney near Swift Creek in Pitt County, NC . Recruiting and drilling camp for Lt. Col. John N. Whitford's Partisan Battalion (1st Battalion Local Defense Troops) March- August 1863

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