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Brunswick County

Brunswick County seal


BRUNSWICK COUNTY GOVERNMENT: 
http://www.brunswickcountync.gov/


COUNTY SEAT: Bolivia


FORMED: 1764
FORMED FROM: New Hanover, Bladen


LAND AREA: 846.97 square miles


2018 POPULATION ESTIMATE: 136,744

White: 86.0%

Black/African American: 10.5%

American Indian: 0.8%

Asian: 0.8%    

Pacific Islander: 0.1%

Two or more races: 1.8%

Hispanic/Latino: 4.8% (of any race)


From State & County QuickFacts, US Census Bureau, 2018.


CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT: 7TH


BIOGRAPHIES FORBiography icon
Brunswick County


Bobcat trackWILDLIFE PROFILES FOR
Coastal Plain


GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION


REGION: Coastal Plain
RIVER BASINS: Cape Fear, Lumber, Map
NEIGHBORING COUNTIES: Columbus, New Hanover, Pender

Brunswick County, NC

See also:  North Carolina Counties (to access links to NCpedia articles for all 100 counties); Bald Head; Brunswick Town; Cape Fear; Cape Fear River Settlements; Resorts.


by William S. Powell, 2006


Brunswick County, located in the Coastal Plain region of southeastern North Carolina, was formed in 1764 from New Hanover and Bladen Counties. The county was named after King George I, who was also the duke of Brunswick and Lunenburg. Early inhabitants of Brunswick County included the Cape Fear Indians, followed by English and French Huguenot settlers. The county seat is now (since 1975) Southport,[*] but for most of the county's history, Bolivia (incorporated in 1911) served in that role. Situated along the Atlantic Coast, Brunswick County has some of North Carolina's most accessible and popular ocean communities, including Sunset Beach, Ocean Isle Beach, Holden Beach, and Bald Head Island. Cape Fear lies at the southern tip of Bald Head Island, and the Cape Fear River runs along the county's eastern border. The Intracoastal Waterway passes through the county as well.


Brunswick County is home to a number of historic sites, including Orton Plantation and Gardens, dating to ca. 1730; Bald Head Island Lighthouse, fondly known as "Old Baldy"; and the Brunswick Inn, built in 1859. Fort Johnston, completed in 1764, served as a refuge for royal governor Josiah Martin in 1775. Brunswick Town/Fort Anderson State Historic Site interprets the colonial and Civil War history of the region. Other cultural institutions include the Southport Maritime Museum, the Brunswick County Historical Society, and the Bald Head Island Conservatory. Well-attended annual events in Brunswick County include the North Carolina Fourth of July Festival, the Christmas-by-the-Sea Festival, the North Carolina Festival-by-the-Sea, and the North Carolina Oyster Festival.


Brunswick County agricultural products include tobacco, vegetables, berries, corn, oats, sweet potatoes, swine, beef cattle, and poultry; and manufactured products include polyester fibers, children's clothes, lumber, and citric acid. In addition to the beaches that draw millions of vacationers, the county's numerous golf courses are a popular attraction for visitors (as well as a growing number of retirees). Charter boat fishing on the Intracoastal Waterway is another important recreational activity in the region. Brunswick County's population was estimated to be 85,000 in 2004.



Annotated history of Brunswick County's formation:


For an annotated history of the county's formation, with the laws affecting the county, boundary lines and changes, and other origin information, visit these references in The Formation of the North Carolina Counties (Corbitt, 2000), available online at North Carolina Digital Collections (note, there may be additional items of interest for the county not listed here):


County formation history: http://digital.ncdcr.gov/cdm/ref/collection/p16062coll9/id/289808


Index entry for the county: http://digital.ncdcr.gov/cdm/ref/collection/p16062coll9/id/290075

Update from N.C. Government & Heritage Library staff: 

*NOTE: the county seat of Brunswick is once again Bolivia.

References:


Lawrence Lee, The History of Brunswick County, North Carolina (1980).


David Stick, Bald Head: A History of Smith Island and Cape Fear (1985).


Additional resources:


Corbitt, David Leroy. 2000. The formation of the North Carolina counties, 1663-1943http://digital.ncdcr.gov/cdm/ref/collection/p16062coll9/id/290103 (accessed June 20, 2017).


Brunswick County Government: http://www.brunswickcountync.gov/


Brunswick County Chamber of Commerce: https://brunswickcountychamber.org/


DigitalNC, Brunswick County: http://www.digitalnc.org/counties/brunswick-county/


North Carolina Digital Collections (explore by place, time period, format): http://digital.ncdcr.gov/cdm/home/browse


Image credits:


Rudersdorf, Amy. 2010. "NC County Maps." Government & Heritage Library, State Library of North Carolina.

Origin - location: 

Comments

When I moved to Bolivia in the early 1970's, myself and three other women of Bolivia were instrumental in helping with the first organized parade in Bolivia, as I understood, and met at the old fire department (requesting vendors and parade participants). Are there records and pictures kept on that event. If so, I would like to have them displayed if possible and the people mentioned as a part of Bolivia's history on parades. Some persons might still be alive and do remember since there were at least two younger women as well. Men of course were involved, but I did not know them.

The county seat is not Southport, it is Bolivia again.

Thank you. A note was included directly under the article. Since the original article is a UNC Press publication, we cannot change it directly.

Mike Millner, NC Government and Heritage Library

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