Counties

Counties
Alamance County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Alamance County, located in the Piedmont region of north central North Carolina, was formed in 1849 out of Orange County. The county was named for either the Great Alamance Creek or the Battle of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Albemarle County
by Powell, William S., Baxley, Laura Young. Albemarle County by Laura Young Baxley and William S. Powell, 2006. The name "Albemarle" was applied to the section or region of northeastern North Carolina that was the earliest permanently [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Alexander County
by Vocci, Robert Blair. Alexander County, located in the western Piedmont region, was formed from sections of Caldwell, Iredell, and Wilkes Counties in 1847. The county took its name from William Julius Alexander, Speaker [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Alleghany County
by Rider, Bernadette. Alleghany County, located in the Blue Ridge Mountains of northwestern North Carolina and bordering Virginia, was formed in 1859 from Ashe County through an act of the North Carolina legislature. Its [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Anson County
by Bangma, Peter. Anson County, located on the eastern edge of North Carolina's Piedmont region, along the South Carolina border, was formed in 1750 with the division of Bladen County. The county takes its name from [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Ashe County
by Bangma, Peter. Ashe County is located in the northwestern corner of North Carolina, bordered by Tennessee and Virginia. Nestled in the Appalachian Mountains, the county was formed in 1799 from portions of Wilkes [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Avery County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Avery County, located in North Carolina's Mountain region and bordered in part by Tennessee, was formed in 1911 from parts of Mitchell, Caldwell, and Watauga Counties. Avery was the one-hundredth and [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Beaufort County
by Bangma, Peter. Beaufort County, located on Pamlico Sound in North Carolina's Coastal Plain region, was originally formed as Pamptecough Precinct, a part of Bath County, in 1705. In 1712 it took its present name [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Bertie County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Bertie County, located in the northeastern Coastal Plain region of North Carolina, was formed in 1722 from Chowan County. Nathaniell Batts, the first permanent white settler in North Carolina, lived [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Bladen County
by Rider, Bernadette. Bladen County lies in the Coastal Plain region of southeastern North Carolina. It was formed in 1734 from New Hanover County and named for English commissioner of trade and plantations Martin Bladen. [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Bladen County in the 1700s
by Bordeaux, Jason. Attempts were made in 1732 in the General Assembly to provide two new precincts, Onslow and Bladen, from the larger precinct of New Hanover. Bladen Precinct was erected on 31 October, 1732, but at [...] (from NCGenWeb.)
Brunswick County
by Powell, William S. Brunswick County, located in the Coastal Plain region of southeastern North Carolina, was formed in 1764 from New Hanover and Bladen Counties. The county was named after King George I, who was also [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Buncombe County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. See also: North Carolina Counties (to access links to NCpedia articles for all 100 counties) by Jay Mazzocchi, 2006 Buncombe County, nicknamed "Land of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Burke County
by Bangma, Peter. Burke County is located in west central North Carolina, in the state's Mountain region. It was formed in 1777 and named for Thomas Burke, delegate to the Continental Congress and governor of the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Bute County
by Hill, Michael. Bute County was a Piedmont North Carolina county between 1764 and 1779. It was named for the Earl of Bute, the prime minister of Great Britain during the reign of King George III. In 1779 Bute County [...] (from Research Branch, NC Office of Archives and History.)
Cabarrus County
by Bangma, Peter. Cabarrus County, located in North Carolina's south central Piedmont, was formed in 1792 from Mecklenburg County and named for Stephen Cabarrus, then Speaker of the North Carolina House of Commons. [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Caldwell County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Caldwell County, located in the Mountain region of western North Carolina, was formed from Burke and Wilkes Counties in 1841. It was named for Joseph Caldwell, the first president of the University [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Camden County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Camden County, located in the Coastal Plain region of northeastern North Carolina and bordered in part by the state of Virginia and Albemarle Sound, was formed in 1777 from Pasquotank County and [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Carteret County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Carteret County, located in the Coastal Plain region of eastern North Carolina, was formed in 1722 from Craven County and was named for Lord Proprietor John Carteret. It is a largely coastal county [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Caswell County
by Powell, William S. Caswell County, located in the northern Piedmont region of North Carolina and partially bordering the state of Virginia, was formed from Orange County in 1777 and named for Richard Caswell, the first [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Catawba County
by Bayley, Elizabeth. Catawba County, located in the western Piedmont region of North Carolina in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, was formed in 1842 from Lincoln County. The county was named for the Catawba [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Chatham County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Chatham County, located in the Piedmont region of North Carolina, was formed from Orange County in 1771 in response to troubles stemming from the War of the Regulation. The county was named for [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Cherokee County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Cherokee County, located in the Mountain region of North Carolina and partially bordering the states of Tennessee and Georgia, is the state's westernmost county. It was formed in 1839 from Macon [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Chowan County
by Powell, William S. Chowan County, known as the "cradle of the colony," is located in the Coastal Plain region of northeastern North Carolina. The county was formed in 1668 by English settlers and was originally called [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Clay County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Clay County, located in the Mountain region of southwestern North Carolina, was formed from Cherokee County in 1861 and named for Henry Clay, a U.S. congressional leader and presidential candidate [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Cleveland County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Cleveland County, located in the Piedmont region of southwestern North Carolina, was formed in 1841 from Rutherford and Lincoln Counties; it was named for Col. Benjamin Cleveland, a hero at the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Columbus County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Columbus County, located in the Coastal Plain region of southeastern North Carolina, was formed in 1808 from Brunswick and Bladen Counties and named for explorer Christopher Columbus. It partially [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Counties
by Stick, David. The formation of counties was one of the first matters attended to by the Lords Proprietors after they received their charter in 1663 from King Charles II for the vast tract of land in America he [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Craven County
by Powell, William S. Craven County, located in the Coastal Plain region of eastern North Carolina, lies within one of early North Carolina's most important regions. Formed in 1705, it was originally called Archdale [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Cumberland County
by Vocci, Robert Blair. Cumberland County, located in North Carolina's Coastal Plain region, was formed from Bladen County in 1754. Its name is derived from the title of Prince William Augustus, the duke of Cumberland, the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Currituck County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Currituck County, located in the Coastal Plain region of northeastern North Carolina, was formed in 1668, with its name taken from an Indian word meaning "land of the wild geese." It partially [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Dare County
by Criner, Allyson C. See also:  North Carolina Counties (to access links to NCpedia articles for all 100 counties); Airplane, First Flight of; Croatoan Indians; Elizabeth II; Fort Raleigh National Historic Site; [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Davidson County
by Criner, Allyson C. Davidson County, located in the Piedmont region of central North Carolina, was formed in 1822 from Rowan County. It was named after William Lee Davidson, a Revolutionary War general killed in the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Davie County
by Criner, Allyson C. Davie County, located in the western part of North Carolina's Piedmont region, was formed in 1836 from Rowan County. It was named for William R. Davie, governor from 1798 to 1799 and founder of the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Davie County - Brief History
by Roth, Marie. Davie County was previously known as the Forks of the Yadkin. The Yadkin River forms its northern and eastern boundaries, and the Lower Yadkin River forms its southern boundary. It was settled [...] (from Davie County Historical and Genealogical Society.)
Dobbs County
by Wegner, Ansley Herring. In 1758 the General Assembly decided that Johnston County should be divided and that the newly formed county would be known as Dobbs, in honor of Arthur Dobbs, the Royal Governor of the colony of [...] (from Research Branch, NC Office of Archives and History.)
Duplin County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Duplin County, located in the Coastal Plain region of North Carolina, was formed in 1750 from New Hanover County and named for Thomas Hay, Lord Duplin, a member of the English Board of Trade and [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Durham County
by Powell, William S. See also: North Carolina Counties (to access links to NCpedia articles for all 100 counties); Bennett Place; Duke Homestead; Duke University; Festival for the Eno; Research Triangle Park; [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Edgecombe County
by Criner, Allyson C. Edgecombe County, located in the Coastal Plain region of eastern North Carolina, was formed in 1741 from Bertie County. It was named for Baron Richard Edgecombe, English member of Parliament and lord [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Forsyth County
by Vocci, Robert Blair. Forsyth County, located in North Carolina's Piedmont region, was formed from Stokes County in 1849 and took its name from Col. Benjamin Forsyth, a state legislator who fought and died in the War of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Franklin County
by Criner, Allyson C. Franklin County, located in the Piedmont region of northeastern North Carolina, was formed from the southern half of no-longer-extant Bute County in the midst of the American Revolution, in 1779, and [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Gaston County
by Criner, Allyson C. Gaston County, located in the south central Piedmont region of North Carolina, was formed from Lincoln County in 1846. It partially borders the state of South Carolina. The county was named for [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Gates County
by Criner, Allyson C. Gates County, located in the Coastal Plain region of northeastern North Carolina, was formed in 1779 from parts of Chowan, Hertford, and Perquimans Counties. Its northern border runs along the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Graham County
by Criner, Allyson C. Graham County, located in western North Carolina along the Tennessee border, was formed in 1872 from the northeastern part of Cherokee County. It was named for William A. Graham, U.S. senator and [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Granville County
by Criner, Allyson C. Granville County, located in the Piedmont region of north central North Carolina and partially bordered by the state of Virginia, was formed in 1746 from Edgecombe County. It was named for John Lord [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Greene County
by Criner, Allyson C. Greene County, located in the Coastal Plain region of east central North Carolina, was formed from Dobbs County (which no longer exists) in 1791. Tuscarora Indians originally inhabited the region, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Guilford County
by Vocci, Robert Blair. Guilford County, located in North Carolina's Piedmont region, was formed from parts of Orange and Rowan Counties in 1771. It was named after Francis North, first earl of Guilford and father of the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Halifax County
by Vocci, Robert Blair. Halifax County, located in North Carolina's Coastal Plain region (on the fall line between the coastal plain and the piedmont), was formed from Edgecombe County in 1758. Its name is derived from [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Harnett County
by Vocci, Robert Blair. Harnett County, located in North Carolina's Coastal Plain region, was formed from Cumberland County in 1855. It is named for Cornelius Harnett, Revolutionary War patriot and delegate to the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Haywood County
by Vocci, Robert Blair. Haywood County, located in North Carolina's Mountain region, was formed from Buncombe County in 1808 and took its name from John Haywood, the state treasurer at the time. The Great Smoky Mountains [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Henderson County
by Vocci, Robert Blair. Henderson County, located in North Carolina's Mountain region, was formed from Buncombe County in 1838. Like its county seat, Hendersonville (incorporated in 1847), the county takes its name from [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Hertford County
by Vocci, Robert Blair. Hertford County, located in North Carolina's Coastal Plain region and partially bordering the state of Virginia, was formed from Bertie, Chowan, and Northampton Counties in 1759. The county took its [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Hoke County
by Vocci, Robert Blair. Hoke County is located in North Carolina's Coastal Plain region in an area originally inhabited by Saura (Cheraw) and Lumbee Indians. The county was formed from Cumberland and Robeson Counties in [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Hyde County
by Vocci, Robert Blair. Hyde County, located in North Carolina's Coastal Plain region, was formed from Bath County in 1705. The area was originally inhabited by various Algonquian Indian tribes. The precinct of Wickham, as [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Iredell County
by Vocci, Robert Blair. Iredell County, located in North Carolina's Piedmont region, was formed by the division of Rowan County in 1788. The area was originally inhabited by Cherokee and Catawba Indians. It was named for [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Jackson County
by Vocci, Robert Blair. Jackson County, located in North Carolina's Mountain region, was formed from Haywood and Macon Counties in 1851, taking its name from President Andrew Jackson. Webster served as the county seat until [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Johnston County
by Vocci, Robert Blair. Johnston County, located in North Carolina's Coastal Plain region, was formed from Craven County in 1746, taking its name from Royal Governor of North Carolina Gabriel Johnston. Communities in the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Jones County
by Vocci, Robert Blair. Jones County, located in North Carolina's Coastal Plain region, was formed from Craven County in 1779, taking its name from radical Revolutionary War leader and Anti-Federalist Willie Jones. Trenton [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Lee County
by Vocci, Robert Blair. Lee County, located in North Carolina's Piedmont region, was formed from Moore and Chatham Counties in 1907 and took its name from Confederate general Robert E. Lee. Sanford (incorporated in 1874) [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Lenoir County
by Vocci, Robert Blair. Lenoir County, located in North Carolina's Coastal Plain region, was formed from no-longer-extant Dobbs County in 1791. It was named for General William Lenoir, a prominent Revolutionary War hero, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Lincoln County
by Vocci, Robert Blair. Lincoln County, located in North Carolina's Piedmont region, was formed in 1779 from Tryon County, which was subsequently eliminated in an effort to erase the memory of oppressive royal governor [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Macon County
by Vocci, Robert Blair. Macon County, located in North Carolina's Mountain region, was formed from Haywood County in 1828 and named for Nathaniel Macon, an early nineteenth-century North Carolina political leader who served [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Madison County
by Vocci, Robert Blair. Madison County, located in North Carolina's Mountain region, was formed from Buncombe and Yancey Counties in 1851 and was named for President James Madison. Communities include the county seat of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Martin County
by Vocci, Robert Blair. Martin County, located in North Carolina's Coastal Plain region, was formed from Halifax and Tyrrell Counties in 1774. It was named for Josiah Martin, the last royal governor of North Carolina. The [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
McDowell County
by Vocci, Robert Blair. McDowell County, located in North Carolina's Mountain region, was formed from Rutherford and Burke Counties in 1842 and took its name from Revolutionary War colonel Joseph McDowell. The county seat [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Mecklenburg County
by Vocci, Robert Blair. See also: North Carolina Counties (to access links to NCpedia articles for all 100 counties) by Robert Blair Vocci, 2006 NOTE: This article was published in [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Mitchell County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Mitchell County, located in the Mountain region of western North Carolina, was formed in 1861 from Yancey, Watauga, Caldwell, Burke, and McDowell Counties; it was named for University of North [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Montgomery County
by Powell, William S. Montgomery County, located in the Piedmont region of south central North Carolina, was formed in 1779 from Anson County and named for Gen. Richard Montgomery, a Revolutionary War brigadier who was [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Moore County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Moore County, located in the Sandhills on the border between North Carolina's Piedmont and Coastal Plain regions, was formed in 1784 from Cumberland County and named for Alfred Moore, a Revolutionary [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Nash County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Nash County, located on the border of the Coastal Plain and Piedmont regions of North Carolina, was formed in 1777 from Edgecombe County and named for Revolutionary War general Francis Nash, who died [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
New Hanover County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. New Hanover County, located in the Coastal Plain region of southeastern North Carolina, was formed in 1729 from Craven County and named in honor of England's King George I of the House of Hanover. [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Newsom, Dallas Walton
by Green, C. Sylvester. Dallas Walton Newsom, educational administrator, county manager, scholar, and poet, was born in Littleton, Warren County, the son of Marion Eaton and Annie Soule Heptinstall Newsom. His grandparents, [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina County Formation: Dates and Parent Counties
by Agan, Kelly. North Carolina County Formation: Dates and Parent Counties By Kelly Agan, North Carolina Government & Heritage Library, [...] (from Government & Heritage Library, State Library of North Carolina.)
Northampton County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Northampton County, located along the fall line between the Coastal Plain and Piedmont regions of North Carolina, was formed in 1741 from Bertie County and named for James Compton, earl of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Onslow County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Onslow County, located in the Coastal Plain region of southeastern North Carolina, was formed in 1734 from New Hanover County and named for Arthur Onslow, Speaker of the House of Commons in the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Orange County
by Powell, William S. Orange County, located in the Piedmont region of North Carolina, was formed in 1752 from Johnston, Bladen, and Granville Counties and named for William V of Orange, the infant grandson of King George [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Pamlico County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Pamlico County, located in the Coastal Plain region of North Carolina, was formed in 1872 from Craven and Beaufort Counties and named for the Pamlico Sound, which, in turn, was named for the Pamlico [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Pasquotank County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Pasquotank County, located in the Coastal Plain region of North Carolina, was formed in 1681 as the Pasquotank Precinct of Albemarle County. It was named after the Pasquotank Indians; the Indian word [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Pender County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Pender County, located in the Coastal Plain region of North Carolina, was formed in 1875 from New Hanover County and named for Confederate general William D. Pender, who died at the Battle of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Perquimans County
by Powell, William S. Perquimans County, located in the Coastal Plain region of North Carolina, was formed in 1679 and originally called Berkeley Precinct of Albemarle County; it was later renamed for the Perquimans [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Person County
by . Person County, located in the Piedmont region of northern North Carolina, was formed in 1791 from Caswell County and named for Revolutionary War general Thomas Person. It is partially bordered by the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Pitt County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Pitt County, located in the Coastal Plain region of eastern North Carolina, was formed in 1760 from Beaufort County and named for William Pitt, earl of Chatham. Early inhabitants of the area included [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Polk County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Polk County, located in the Mountain region of western North Carolina, was formed in 1855 from Henderson and Rutherford Counties and was named for Revolutionary War colonel William Polk. It is [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Randolph County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Randolph County, located in the Piedmont region of North Carolina, was formed in 1779 from Guilford County and named for Peyton Randolph, the first president of the Continental Congress. Early [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Randolph County Courthouse history
by Whatley, L. MacKay, Varner, Amanda W., Ivey, Cheryl. In 1778, during the midst of the Revolutionary War, citizens of the southern half of Guilford County petitioned the NC General Assembly to create a new county, arguing that the “great distance to [...] (from Randolph County Manager's Office.)
Richmond County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Richmond County, located in the Piedmont region in southern North Carolina, was formed in 1779 from Anson County and was named after Charles Lennox, the third duke of Richmond. Early inhabitants of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Robeson County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Robeson County, located in the Coastal Plain region of North Carolina, was formed in 1787 from Bladen County and was named for Revolutionary War colonel Thomas Robeson. The Saura (Cheraw) and Lumbee [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Rockingham County
by Powell, William S. Rockingham County, located in the Piedmont region of North Carolina, was formed in 1785 from Guilford County and named for Charles Watson-Wentworth, second marquis of Rockingham, the British prime [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Rowan County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Rowan County, located in the Piedmont region of North Carolina, was formed in 1753 from Anson County and was named for Matthew Rowan, the governor of North Carolina at the time of the county's [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Rutherford County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Rutherford County, located on the border of the Piedmont and Mountain regions of North Carolina, was formed in 1779 and named after Revolutionary War general Griffith Rutherford, a member of the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Sampson County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. See also: North Carolina Counties (to access links to NCpedia articles for all 100 counties) by Jay Mazzocchi, 2006 See also: Hollerin' [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Scotland County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. See also: North Carolina Counties (to access links to NCpedia articles for all 100 counties) by Jay Mazzocchi, 2006 See also: Indian Museum of the Carolinas; [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Stanly County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. See also: North Carolina Counties (to access links to NCpedia articles for all 100 counties) by Jay Mazzocchi, 2006 Stanly County, located in the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Stokes County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. See also: North Carolina Counties (to access links to NCpedia articles for all 100 counties) by Jay Mazzocchi, 2006 Stokes County, located in the Piedmont region of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Surry County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. See also: North Carolina Counties (to access links to NCpedia articles for all 100 counties) by Jay Mazzocchi, 2006 See also: Andy Griffith Show; Horne Creek [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Swain County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. See also: North Carolina Counties (to access links to NCpedia articles for all 100 counties) by Jay Mazzocchi, 2006 See also: Cherokee Indians; Great Smoky [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Transylvania County
by Bangma, Peter. Transylvania County is located in the Mountain region of southwestern North Carolina along the South Carolina border. It was formed in 1861 from portions of Jackson and Henderson Counties. Its county [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Tryon County
by Hill, Michael. In 1768, the Colonial Assembly acted upon the entreaties of Mecklenburg County citizens who complained about having to travel long distances to the county court as a result of the county’s immense [...] (from Research Branch, NC Office of Archives and History.)
Tyrrell County
by . Tyrrell County is located on the southern shore of Albemarle Sound, in the Coastal Plain of northeastern North Carolina. Named for Sir John Tyrrell, one of the Lords Proprietors, the county was [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Union County
by Powell, William S. Union County, located in the Piedmont region of North Carolina, was formed in 1842 from Mecklenburg and Anson Counties. Democrats wanted to name it for one of their leaders (Andrew Jackson) and Whigs [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Vance County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Vance County, located in the Piedmont region of North Carolina, was formed in 1881 from Granville, Warren, and Franklin Counties and named for Zebulon Baird Vance, governor of North Carolina and U.S. [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Wake County
by Powell, William S. See also: North Carolina Counties (to access links to NCpedia articles for all 100 counties) by William S. Powell, 2006 See also: Joel Lane House; Meredith [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Warren County
by Bangma, Peter. Warren County, formed in 1779 from no-longer-extant Bute County, is located along the Virginia-North Carolina line in the northeastern Piedmont. It was an early center of the state's tobacco- and [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Washington County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Washington County, located in the Coastal Plain region of North Carolina, was formed in 1799 from Tyrrell County and named for President George Washington. It is partially bordered by the Albemarle [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Watauga County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Watauga County, located in the Mountain region of North Carolina, was formed in 1849 from Ashe, Wilkes, Caldwell, and Yancey Counties and named after the Watauga River ("Watauga" is an Indian word [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Wayne County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Wayne County, located in the Coastal Plain region of North Carolina, was formed in 1779 from Dobbs County and named for Revolutionary War general "Mad Anthony" Wayne. Early inhabitants of the area [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Wilkes County
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Wilkes County, located in the Mountain region of North Carolina, was formed in 1777 from Surry County and named for the English statesman John Wilkes, a member of the Parliament who fought for [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Wilson County
by Bayley, Elizabeth. Wilson County, located in the Coastal Plain region of North Carolina, was formed in 1855 from Edgecombe, Nash, Johnston, and Wayne Counties; it was named for Louis Dicken Wilson, a delegate to the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Yadkin County
by Bayley, Elizabeth. Yadkin County, located in the Piedmont region of northwestern North Carolina in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains, was formed in 1850 from Surry County and named for the Yadkin River. Early [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Yancey County
by Bangma, Peter. Yancey County, located in the Mountain region of North Carolina and partially bordering the state of Tennessee, was formed in 1833 from Burke and Buncombe Counties and named for Bartlett Yancey, U.S. [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
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