Culture

Culture
100 North Carolina Icons: From Our State Magazine
by Agan, Kelly. North Carolina has many traditions, places, and events that have come to be well-known or iconic representations of the state's history and folk heritage. In its July 2012 edition, Our State [...] (from Government & Heritage Library, State Library of North Carolina.)
African American History, Business and Culture: North Carolina 1870-1920
by Parramore, Thomas C., Watson, Harry L., Nathans, Sydney, Anderson, Jean Bradley, Clayton, Thomas H., Fenn, Elizabeth A., Wood, Peter H. By Elizabeth A. Fenn, Peter H. Wood, Harry L. Watson, Thomas H. Clayton, Sydney Nathans, Thomas C. Parramore, and Jean B. Anderson; Maps by Mark Anderson Moore. Edited by Joe A. Mobley. [...] (from The Way We Lived in North Carolina, NC Office of Archives and History and UNC Press.)
African and African American Storytelling
by Wilson, Madafo Lloyd. African and African American Storytelling By Madafo Lloyd Wilson Reprinted with permission from the Tar Heel Junior Historian, Spring 2002. Tar Heel Junior Historian Association, NC Museum of [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Apprenticeship
by Stevenson, George, Canipe, Jeremy T. Apprenticeship by George Stevenson and Jeremy T. Canipe, 2006. See also: Indentured [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Archaeology Part 1: Archaeological Research in the Coastal Plain
by Freeman, Joan E., Davis, R. P. Stephen, Jr., Lawrence, Richard W. Archaeology by Joan E. Freeman and R. P. Stephen Davis Jr., 2006. Additional research provided by Richard W. Lawrence. See also: American Indians; Archaeology of Early NC; Cherokee [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Archaeology Part 2: Discoveries of the North Carolina Piedmont
by Freeman, Joan E., Davis, R. P. Stephen, Jr., Lawrence, Richard W. Archaeology by Joan E. Freeman and R. P. Stephen Davis Jr., 2006. Additional research provided by Richard W. Lawrence. Part 1: Archaeological Research in the Coastal Plain; Part 2: [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Archaeology Part 4: Underwater Archaeology
by Freeman, Joan E., Davis, R. P. Stephen, Jr., Lawrence, Richard W. Archaeology by Joan E. Freeman and R. P. Stephen Davis Jr., 2006. Additional research provided by Richard W. Lawrence. Part 1: Archaeological Research in the Coastal Plain; Part 2: [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Averett, Ben: Doing It Right
by Cecelski, David S. I had been hearing about Ben Averett's annual Brunswick stew for years. Every October since 1967, Averett has scrubbed out a 25-gallon black iron wash pot, built a hardwood fire under it and prepared [...] (from Listening to History, News and Observer.)
Azalea Festival
by Stinson, Craig M. The North Carolina Azalea Festival is held every April in Wilmington as a celebration of the beauty of the abundant azalea flowers in the vicinity. In the 1930s Houston Moore, interested in the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Ballad of Tom Dooley
by Mitchell, Thornton W. Thomas C. Dula was born in Wilkes County on 20 June 1844, the son of Mary Dula. In 1862 he enlisted in the 42nd Regiment, North Carolina Infantry, as a private. Dula was captured at Kinston and was a [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Barbers
by Powell, William S. By the time North Carolina was colonized, the French custom of having barbers do surgery was never practiced in the colonies. Striped barber poles were abandoned, only to be revived by the appearance [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Bathing
by Powell, William S. Bathing, for most North Carolinians until the twentieth century, was an irregular practice often regarded as unhealthy. William Byrd's "secret history" of the surveying of the dividing line between [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Beauty Shops
by Fick, Virginia Gunn. Beauty shops, or beauty parlors, have had a notable impact on the lives of North Carolina women since the early twentieth century. Cosmetologists delivered more than better looks; they became [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Beer and Breweries
by Campbell, Karl E. The brewing of beer in the region that would become North Carolina began long before the first Europeans arrived. According to John Lawson's A New Voyage to Carolina (1709), Native Americans made [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Blue Laws
by Williams, Wiley J. "Blue laws" refer to statutes designed to enforce morality as some lawmakers understand it, such as restricting the hours that stores can open on Sundays or the sale of alcoholic beverages. The term [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Blues
by Holden, Charles J., Baker, Bruce E. North Carolina boasts significant contributions to the musical tradition known as the blues. Throughout its formative decades, the blues was the music of solo artists rather than groups, with the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Buck Dancing
by Baker, Bruce E. Buck dancing is a folk dance that originated among African Americans during the era of slavery. It was largely associated with the North Carolina Piedmont and, later, with the blues. The original [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Burial Customs
by DiNome, William G. Burial Customs by William G. DiNome, 2006 See also: Funerals; Town Creek Indian Mound. The nature of the specific burial customs that may have existed among the people inhabiting the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Cannon Award
by Gatton, T. Harry. The Ruth Coltrane Cannon Award, North Carolina's most prestigious award for historic preservation achievement, was established by Ruth Coltrane Cannon and her husband, Charles A. Cannon, in 1948. The [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Cape Fear Museum
by Littlejohn, Beverly. The Cape Fear Museum in Wilmington began as the Confederate Museum, started by the Wilmington chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy in 1898. It was originally located in a room on the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Cape Fear Valley Scottish Festival
by Williams, Wiley J. The Cape Fear Valley Scottish Festival, held in Fayetteville on 19-24 Nov. 1939, commemorated the 200th anniversary of the arrival of the Scottish Highlanders in the Cape Fear Valley as well as the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Charlotte Hawkins Brown Museum
by Stoesen, Alexander R. Charlotte Hawkins Brown Museum by Alexander R. Stoesen, 2006 See also: Brown, Charlotte Hawkins; Palmer Memorial Institute; Museums The Charlotte Hawkins Brown Museum is located in [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Child Labor
by Reimer, Kirstin, Willard, George-Anne. North Carolina children have worked, often alongside their parents, on family farms or elsewhere since colonial times. As the South industrialized, children began to leave home to find work in [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Classical Music
by Williams, Wiley J., Foote, Margaret, Boyer, Miriam, Sherwood, Mary Bates. Classical Music by Margaret Foote and Wiley J. Williams, 2006 Additional research provided by Miriam Boyer and Mary Bates Sherwood. See also: Brevard Music Center; Eastern Music [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Clogging
by Baker, Bruce E. Clogging is a form of traditional solo step dancing to traditional string music common in western North Carolina and growing in popularity across the state and nation. The term has been used to [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Close to the Land: North Carolina 1820-1870
by Parramore, Thomas C., Watson, Harry L., Nathans, Sydney, Anderson, Jean Bradley, Clayton, Thomas H., Fenn, Elizabeth A., Wood, Peter H. By Elizabeth A. Fenn, Peter H. Wood, Harry L. Watson, Thomas H. Clayton, Sydney Nathans, Thomas C. Parramore, and Jean B. Anderson; Maps by Mark Anderson Moore. Edited by Joe A. Mobley. [...] (from The Way We Lived in North Carolina, NC Office of Archives and History and UNC Press.)
Clothing and Fashion
by Williams, Wiley J. Clothing and Fashion by Wiley J. Williams, 2006 Clothing and fashion styles during the colonial through pre-Civil War eras in North Carolina did not change as quickly as in modern times, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Cockfighting
by Sumner, Jim L. Cockfighting in North Carolina dates from the colonial period. A cockfight involves two specially bred gamecocks equipped with steel gaffs attached to each leg fighting until one is disabled. The [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Country Music
by Baker, Bruce E., Stephenson, Shelby. Country music is a distinctively American form of popular music based on traditional, southern, Anglo-American folk music and influenced to some extent by the blues. North Carolinians played a [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
County Fairs
by Williams, Wiley J. County fairs began in North Carolina nearly 200 years before the first state fair was held in Raleigh in 1853. Early North Carolina counties such as Albemarle, Clarendon, and Craven were authorized [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Courtship Customs
by Shaw, Taylor. Courtship customs in North Carolina have generally followed the same trends evident in the rest of the United States, with slight differences owing to the historically agrarian and rural nature of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Crawford, Emma: A Good Life
by Cecelski, David S. Listening to her, I felt almost dazed at how much has changed in one woman's lifetime. I couldn't get used to the fact that she was born the year that Thomas Edison patented his motion-picture [...] (from Listening to History, News and Observer.)
Crittenden Award
by Cashion, Jerry C. The Christopher Crittenden Memorial Award was established in 1969 by the North Carolina Literary and Historical Association in memory of C. Christopher Crittenden, longtime secretary-treasurer of the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Crofter Immigration
by Caudill, William S. The failed immigration of tenant farmers, or crofters, from the Scottish Highlands to the Sandhills region of eastern North Carolina in 1884 is one of the most peculiar instances of European [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Cultural Resources, Department of
by Williams, Wiley J. Natural and Cultural Resources, Department of [Previously named: Cultural Resources, Department of] The Department name was changed to the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Decoration Day
by Rohr, Karl. Decoration Day in North Carolina is the name used to describe a variety of ceremonies held in tribute to God, deceased loved ones, country, or community history. The date of a decoration day depends [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Decoys
by Carr, Dawson V. Wild waterfowl provided an abundant source of food for settlers of the North Carolina coastal regions, and early residents often made decoys to lure the birds within range of their guns. Not until [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Dirt Eaters
by Zimmerman, Carmena B. "Dirt eaters," also called "clay eaters," "sandlappers," and other names, are individuals who regularly eat soil as part of their diet. It has been generally accepted that the practice of soil eating [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Divorce
by Semcer, Melissa. Divorce, like marriage, is a civil contract between the parties involved. Religious and social attitudes toward marriage and property rights made divorce in nineteenth-century North Carolina rare but [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Dixie Dynamo
by Hill, Michael. Dixie Dynamo, the nickname given North Carolina in a 1962 article in National Geographic magazine, was widely adopted by the state's political leaders, businesspeople, and journalists as a way of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Dulcimer
by Troxler, Carole Watterson. Dulcimer by Carole Watterson Troxler, 2006 Settlement schools in the southern Appalachian Mountains at the start of the twentieth century nurtured elements of mountain culture they believed [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Economic Progress and Its Perils: North Carolina 1870-1920
by Parramore, Thomas C., Watson, Harry L., Nathans, Sydney, Anderson, Jean Bradley, Clayton, Thomas H., Fenn, Elizabeth A., Wood, Peter H. By Elizabeth A. Fenn, Peter H. Wood, Harry L. Watson, Thomas H. Clayton, Sydney Nathans, Thomas C. Parramore, and Jean B. Anderson; Maps by Mark Anderson Moore. Edited by Joe A. Mobley. [...] (from The Way We Lived in North Carolina, NC Office of Archives and History and UNC Press.)
El festival internacional oficial
by . Extraído de Libro de hechos de El Viejo Estado del Norte. La propiedad literaria 2011 por la Oficina de Archivos e Historia de Carolina del Norte, Departamento de Recursos Culturale de [...] (from NC Office of Archives and History.)
El festival oficial de la berza
by . Extraído de Libro de hechos de El Viejo Estado del Norte. La propiedad literaria 2011 por la Oficina de Archivos e Historia de Carolina del Norte, Departamento de Recursos Culturale de [...] (from NC Office of Archives and History.)
El lugar oficial del nacimiento de la cerámica tradicional del estado
by . Extraído de Libro de hechos de El Viejo Estado del Norte. La propiedad literaria 2011 por la Oficina de Archivos e Historia de Carolina del Norte, Departamento de Recursos Culturale de [...] (from NC Office of Archives and History.)
El teatro oficial comunal
by . Extraído de Libro de hechos de El Viejo Estado del Norte. La propiedad literaria 2011 por la Oficina de Archivos e Historia de Carolina del Norte, Departamento de Recursos Culturale de [...] (from NC Office of Archives and History.)
English Dialects
by Porter, Matthew C. The English language in North Carolina has been growing and evolving since 1584, when the first English explorers to visit North America came to the Outer Banks, making it the first place in the New [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Engstrom, Mary Claire
by . Mary Claire Engstrom was born in 1906 in Kansas City, Mo., and moved to Chapel Hill, N.C., to attend the University of North Carolina, earning her Ph.D. in English literature in 1939. She is best [...] (from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Libraries.)
Express Lanes and Country Roads: North Carolina 1920-2001
by Parramore, Thomas C., Watson, Harry L., Nathans, Sydney, Anderson, Jean Bradley, Clayton, Thomas H., Fenn, Elizabeth A., Wood, Peter H. By Elizabeth A. Fenn, Peter H. Wood, Harry L. Watson, Thomas H. Clayton, Sydney Nathans, Thomas C. Parramore, and Jean B. Anderson; Maps by Mark Anderson Moore. Edited by Joe A. Mobley. [...] (from The Way We Lived in North Carolina, NC Office of Archives and History and UNC Press.)
Fatback
by Williams, Wiley J. Fatback, the fatty meat from the back of a hog that is usually dry-cured with salt, has been a staple ingredient in North Carolina and southern cooking since colonial times. Through the years certain [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Festival for the Eno
by McFee, Philip. The Festival for the Eno, a multiple-day event held annually in northern Durham since 1980 and sponsored by the Eno River Association with the help of local establishments, is considered to be one of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Fiction Part 1: Humanizing History: Pioneers of North Carolina Fiction
by Mitchell, Ted, McFee, Philip, McFee, Michael, McMillan, Douglas J. Fiction by Philip McFee and Ted Mitchell, 2006 Additional research provided by Michael McFee and Douglas J. McMillan. See also: Literary Awards; Literary Journals; Matilda Berkely or, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Fiction Part 2: North Carolina Writers in the Early to Mid-Twentieth Century
by Mitchell, Ted, McFee, Philip, McFee, Michael, McMillan, Douglas J. As the twentieth century dawned, North Carolina fiction writers continued to weave impressive historical narratives, often throwing light on the distressing political, racial, and personal divisions [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Fiction Part 3: North Carolina Fiction Comes of Age
by Mitchell, Ted, McFee, Philip, McFee, Michael, McMillan, Douglas J. The portrayal of the relationships, perceptions, and struggles of "common" North Carolinians-particularly in small towns ranging from the mountains to the coast-became the focus of the works of many [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Filmmaking
by Williams, Wiley J., Faulkner, Ronnie W., Albright, Alex. Filmmaking by Alex Albright, 2006 Additional research provided by Ronnie W. Faulkner and Wiley J. Williams. See also: North Carolina Film Board; Town Documentaries. Studio movie [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Fish Stews
by Sparrow, W. Keats. Fish stews are more than eastern North Carolina folk meals; like their cousin the pig pickin', they are highly ritualized and symbolic social events representing a celebration of the cornucopia of a [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Fishing Camps
by Stick, David. Fishing camps of primitive design were maintained by crews of commercial fishermen at isolated spots along the North Carolina coast during the last half of the nineteenth century and the early part [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Folk Dance, Clogging
by Case, Steven, Kemp, Amy. State Folk Dance of North Carolina: Clogging by Steven Case and Amy Kemp, 2017. NC Government & Heritage Library. See also: North Carolina State Symbols and Official Adoptions main [...] (from Government & Heritage Library, State Library of North Carolina.)
Folk Festivals - Part 1: Introduction
by Pertalion, Patricia L., Baker, Bruce E., McFee, Philip. Folk Festivals by Philip McFee and Bruce E. Baker, 2006 Additional research provided by Patricia L. Pertalion. See also: Azalea Festival; Eastern Music Festival; Festival for the Eno; [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Folk Festivals - Part 2: Original Folk Festivals and Contemporary Gatherings
by Baker, Bruce E. Folk Festivals by Philip McFee and Bruce E. Baker, 2006 Additional research provided by Patricia L. Pertalion. See also: Azalea Festival; Eastern Music Festival; Festival for the Eno; [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Folk Festivals - Part 3: Ethnic and Holiday Festivals
by Baker, Bruce E. Folk Festivals by Philip McFee and Bruce E. Baker, 2006 Additional research provided by Patricia L. Pertalion. See also: Azalea Festival; Eastern Music Festival; Festival for the Eno; [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Folk Festivals - Part 4: Music and Food Festivals
by Baker, Bruce E. Folk Festivals by Philip McFee and Bruce E. Baker, 2006 Additional research provided by Patricia L. Pertalion. See also: Azalea Festival; Eastern Music Festival; Festival for the Eno; [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Folk Festivals - Part 5: References
by Baker, Bruce E. Folk Festivals by Philip McFee and Bruce E. Baker, 2006 Additional research provided by Patricia L. Pertalion. See also: Azalea Festival; Eastern Music Festival; Festival for the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Folk Music- Part 1: Introduction
by Troxler, Carole Watterson, Williams, Wiley J., Baker, Bruce E. Folk Music by Bruce E. Baker and Carole Watterson Troxler, 2006 Additional research provided by Wiley J. Williams. See also:"Ballad of Tom Dooley"; Mountain Dance and Folk Festival; [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Folk Music- Part 2: Ballads and Balladists of North Carolina
by Troxler, Carole Watterson, Williams, Wiley J., Baker, Bruce E. Folk Music by Bruce E. Baker and Carole Watterson Troxler, 2006 Additional research provided by Wiley J. Williams. See also:"Ballad of Tom Dooley"; Mountain Dance and Folk Festival; [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Folk Music- Part 3: People and Trends in North Carolina Folk Music
by Troxler, Carole Watterson, Williams, Wiley J., Baker, Bruce E. Folk Music by Bruce E. Baker and Carole Watterson Troxler, 2006 Additional research provided by Wiley J. Williams.   See also:"Ballad of Tom Dooley"; Mountain Dance and Folk [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Folk Music- Part 4: References
by Troxler, Carole Watterson, Williams, Wiley J., Baker, Bruce E. Folk Music by Bruce E. Baker and Carole Watterson Troxler, 2006 Additional research provided by Wiley J. Williams. See also:"Ballad of Tom Dooley"; Mountain Dance and Folk Festival; [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Foot Washing
by Jonas, Glenn. Foot washing is an act of worship practiced by various Christian groups in North Carolina and other southern states. The practice involves bathing the feet of a fellow church member and is usually [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Fort Raleigh National Historic Site
by Evans, Phillip W. Fort Raleigh National Historic Site by Phillip W. Evans, 2006 See also: Roanoke Island - First English Colonies (from Research Branch, NC OA&H); Cape Hatteras National Seashore; Lost [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Fraktur
by Homrighaus, Ruth E. Fraktur is a form of folk art imported by Pennsylvania German immigrants to North Carolina in the eighteenth century. Fraktur's central feature is elaborate lettering based on the German gothic [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Funerals
by Marshall, Patricia Phillips, DiNome, William G., Williams, Wiley J. Funerals by Patricia Phillips Marshall, 2006 Additional research provided by William G. DiNome and Wiley J. Williams. See also: Burial Customs; Decoration Day; Mourning Rings; [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Gaelic Language
by Caudill, William S. Gaelic Language by William S. Caudill, 2006 See also: Highland Games; Highland Scots; Scottish Settlers; Cape Fear Valley Scottish Festival; Argyll [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Gays and Lesbians
by Stoesen, Alexander R. Until the final decades of the twentieth century, the personal lives of gay and lesbian people in North Carolina were shrouded in silence. While homosexuality certainly existed in the state, talking [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Gentry
by Carpenter, Joanne G. Gentry, also known as the "planter class," is a term associated with colonial and antebellum North Carolina and other southern states that refers to an upper middle class of wealthy gentlemen farmers [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
God's Acre
by Bair, Anna Withers. God's Acre is the name Moravian congregations give their church cemeteries. In this case, "acre" is from the Old High German word for "field"; "der Gottesacker," or God's Field, is where the physical [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Gouging
by Sumner, Jim L. Gouging, also known as "no-holds-barred" or "rough-and-tumble" fighting, was an especially violent form of fighting popular in the antebellum southern backcountry. A mixture of boxing, wrestling, and [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Hatting
by Fick, Virginia Gunn. Hatting, or hat making, was a significant craft in North Carolina from the mid-eighteenth century well into the nineteenth. In a letter dated 4 Jan. 1754, Governor Arthur Dobbs informed the Board of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Highland Games
by Caudill, William S. The staging of Highland Games in a number of sites throughout North Carolina-home to the largest settlement of Highland Scots outside of Scotland until well into the nineteenth century-has succeeded [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Hillbillies
by McKinney, Gordon B. "Hillbillies" is a term of derision used to identify the inhabitants of the Appalachian and Ozark Mountains of the South. In North Carolina, the term is usually applied to the economically [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Historic Preservation
by Lamm, Alan K., Carpenter, Joanne G. During the 1930s North Carolina received federal money for historic preservation through the Works Progress Administration, part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal. Federal funds permitted [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Historical Markers
by Hill, Michael. Historical markers in North Carolina are typically freestanding, silver-and-black cast aluminum signs on posts erected along roadsides, but they also include plaques and other forms of commemoration. [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
History of the North Carolina Awards
by Rudersdorf, Amy, Agan, Kelly. History of the North Carolina Awards by Amy Rudersdorf, N.C. Government & Heritage Library, 2012; Kelly Agan, N.C. Government & Heritage Library, 2014, 2015, 2016, [...] (from NCpedia.)
Hoi Toiders
by Dees-Killette, Amelia. Hoi Toiders is the commonly used name for the residents of certain sections of the Outer Banks in North Carolina who, because of geographic barriers, have retained a unique dialect unheard in other [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Hollerin' Contest
by Stinson, Craig M. The Hollerin' Contest, an annual fair established in Spivey's Corner in 1969, celebrates the art of hollering, which, before the telephone, was an essential means of communicating for people in the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Hooker
by Joyner, Whitmel M. "Hooker," a slang word for prostitute, was used in an 1845 letter written by a student to a classmate at the University of North Carolina. This is the earliest known written usage of the word in this [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Humor
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Humor has played a distinctive role in the lives of North Carolinians from the days of the earliest British explorations to the region. As much as any other aspect of human life, humor can be [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Immigration
by Holland, Ron, DiNome, William G., Williams, Wiley J., Linn, Jo White, Justesen, Benjamin R. Immigration by Ron Holland and Wiley J. Williams, 2006 Additional research provided by William G. DiNome, Benjamin R. Justesen, and Jo White Linn. See also: Exodusters; German Settlers; [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Industry Comes of Age: Tobacco, Textiles and Railroads, North Carolina 1870-1920
by Parramore, Thomas C., Watson, Harry L., Nathans, Sydney, Anderson, Jean Bradley, Clayton, Thomas H., Fenn, Elizabeth A., Wood, Peter H. By Elizabeth A. Fenn, Peter H. Wood, Harry L. Watson, Thomas H. Clayton, Sydney Nathans, Thomas C. Parramore, and Jean B. Anderson; Maps by Mark Anderson Moore. Edited by Joe A. Mobley. [...] (from The Way We Lived in North Carolina, NC Office of Archives and History and UNC Press.)
John C. Campbell Folk School
by Baker, Bruce E. The John C. Campbell Folk School is located in Brasstown, near the town of Murphy in western North Carolina (Cherokee County). Named for social worker and writer John C. Campbell, the school was [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
John Kuners
by Steelman, Bennett L. John Kuners (also known as John Kooners, John Canoes, Junkanoes, or Jonkonnu) were troupes of slaves and free blacks, brightly dressed and often masked, who sang and danced on Christmas and New [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Kittner, Harry: A Candle Is Lit
by Cecelski, David S. Harry Kittner is one of the last congregants at Temple Emanu-El, in the small town of Weldon. This synagogue was the heart of a Jewish community that once thrived in Eastern North Carolina but has [...] (from Listening to History, News and Observer.)
La academia militar oficial
by . Extraído de Libro de hechos de El Viejo Estado del Norte. La propiedad literaria 2011 por la Oficina de Archivos e Historia de Carolina del Norte, Departamento de Recursos Culturale de [...] (from NC Office of Archives and History.)
La trucha de agua fresca del estado
by . Extraído de Libro de hechos de El Viejo Estado del Norte. La propiedad literaria 2011 por la Oficina de Archivos e Historia de Carolina del Norte, Departamento de Recursos Culturale de [...] (from NC Office of Archives and History.)
Language Tells NC History
by Wolfram, Walt, Reaser, Jeffrey. Have you ever used a juvember for target practice, seen a boomer in a tree, or acted like a dingbatter? If you know what these words mean, you probably have traveled all over North Carolina and know [...] (from Tar Heel Junior Historian, NC Museum of History.)
Latinos
by Lamm, Alan K. Latinos, also referred to as Hispanics, lived in North Carolina in relatively small numbers until the 1980s, when many people of Mexican and Central American descent began coming to the state in [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Levine Museum of the New South
by Martin, Brenden. The Levine Museum of the New South is a private, nonprofit museum dedicated to preserving and presenting the history of Charlotte and the surrounding Carolina Piedmont. Recognizing the momentous [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Los bailes del estado
by . Extraído de Libro de hechos de El Viejo Estado del Norte. La propiedad literaria 2011 por la Oficina de Archivos e Historia de Carolina del Norte, Departamento de Recursos Culturale de [...] (from NC Office of Archives and History.)
Lost Cause
by Holden, Charles J. Lost Cause by Charles J. Holden, 2006 See also: Confederate Monuments Immediately following the Civil War, many southerners began paying nostalgic tribute in print and in public to the Old [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Louise Wells Cameron Art Museum
by Johnston, W. Lee, Jr. The Louise Wells Cameron Art Museum opened in 1962 in St. John's Masonic Lodge at 114 Orange Street in Wilmington as the St. John's Museum of Art. The building had been designed to house St. John's [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Marriage
by Linn, Jo White. Marriage in North Carolina, until 1868, could be either by license or by banns (public announcement) in the county where the bride lived. It is estimated that in North Carolina two-thirds of all [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Mattamuskeet Apples
by Spencer, R. S., Jr. Mattamuskeet apples are named for Lake Mattamuskeet, in North Carolina's coastal Hyde County, where the apples originated. Ranging from medium to large in size, the apples have a yellow flesh covered [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Mealtimes
by Powell, William S. Mealtimes by William S. Powell, 2006 Mealtimes in North Carolina were long set to accommodate those engaged in manual labor, particularly field workers in planting and harvesting. Farms and [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Medicine Shows
by Menius, Arthur. Medicine Shows by Arthur Menius, 2006 See also: Crazy Water Crystals; Patent Medicines; Country Music Medicine shows, from roughly the end of the Civil [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Melungeons
by Powell, William S. Melungeons are descendants of people of mixed ethnic ancestry who, before the end of the eighteenth century, were discovered living in limited areas of what is now the southeastern United States, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Messuage
by Powell, William S. "Messuage" was a term not widely used in North Carolina, although it appears occasionally in deeds and wills. It refers to the residence or dwelling house, outbuildings, supporting structures, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Mint Museum of Art
by Baker, Bruce E. The Mint Museum of Art is located in Charlotte in a building that once served as the first branch of the U.S. Mint outside Philadelphia. Gold was discovered in the Charlotte area in 1799, and by the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Moonshine
by Simpson, Bland, Yancey, Noel, Hewitt, Kimberly. Moonshine by Bland Simpson, 2006 Additional research provided by Kimberly Hewitt and Noel Yancey. See also: Alcoholic Beverage Control Commission; Brown Bagging; Beer and Breweries; Beer; [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Moravian Music
by Hutcheson, John A., Jr. Moravian music is one of North Carolina's most striking and significant contributions to the heritage of the fine arts in the United States. In the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Mountain Dance and Folk Festival
by Baker, Bruce E. Asheville since 1928. That year, Bascom Lamar Lunsford, a passionate lover of mountain music and culture and an active collector of folk music, organized a contest for musicians and dancers in [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Mourning Rings
by Powell, William S. Mourning rings, worn as a memorial of a deceased person, were mentioned as early as 1703 in England. In his will in 1716, James Blunt of Chowan County left each of his five daughters a gold ring, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Mule Day
by Faulkner, Ronnie W. Mule Day is an annual celebration drawing tens of thousands of visitors to the small Johnston County town of Benson. Held in late September, the event was started in 1949 by Nowell Smith Jr., with [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts
by Caldwell, Martha Belle. The Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (MESDA), founded in Winston-Salem in 1965 by Frank L. Horton, is dedicated to exhibiting and researching the regional decorative arts of the South before [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Museum of the Albemarle
by Patteson, Angelyn H. The Museum of the Albemarle in Elizabeth City chronicles the story of the people of the first region of North Carolina opened to European settlement through permanent and changing exhibits, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Museum of the Cape Fear
by Patteson, Angelyn H. The Museum of the Cape Fear in Fayetteville is the third regional branch of the North Carolina Museum of History and the only one that began as a branch museum. (The other two regional branches, the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
National Humanities Center
by Leuchtenburg, William E. In September 1978, the National Humanities Center at Research Triangle Park admitted its first class of fellows. In keeping with its stated purpose-"to encourage scholarship in the humanities and to [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
National Register of Historic Places: North Carolina Sites
by Agan, Kelly. The National Register of Historic Places was authorized by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 and is administered under the National Park Service.  Since that time, more than 90,000 [...] (from Government & Heritage Library, State Library of North Carolina.)
National Society of the Colonial Dames of America in the State of North Carolina
by Tetterton, Beverly. The National Society of the Colonial Dames of America in the State of North Carolina, formerly called the North Carolina Society of the Colonial Dames, was the fourteenth state society added to the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina Day
by Causey, Ellen Fitzgibbons. North Carolina Day was a program presented in North Carolina's public schools during the early years of the twentieth century that was designed to "awaken a proper pride in the history of the state." [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina Debutante Ball
by Huffines, Hart. Debutante balls, or cotillions-social events in which parents formally present their teenage daughters to adult society-have been a feature of U.S. culture since the late nineteenth century. These [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina Exposition of 1884
by Hill, Michael. The North Carolina Exposition of 1884, promoting the agricultural and mechanical arts, was an important step in the progress of the state's industrial growth. The aim of the exposition was to boost [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina Film Board
by Mazzocchi, Jay. The North Carolina Film Board (NCFB), the first state-sponsored documentary film unit in the United States, existed from 1962 to 1965 under Governor Terry Sanford. According to Sanford, the purpose [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina Historical Review
by Crow, Jeffrey J. The North Carolina Historical Review was founded in 1924 under the aegis of the North Carolina Historical Commission. Trinity College history professor William K. Boyd proposed the quarterly journal [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina History Interactive Timeline: State Symbols and Other Official Adoptions
by Agan, Kelly. North Carolina History Interactive Timeline: North Carolina State Symbols and Other Official Adoptions by Kelly Agan, N.C. Government & Heritage Library, 2014; updated 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, [...] (from Government & Heritage Library, State Library of North Carolina.)
North Carolina Maritime Museum
by Barfield, Rodney D. The North Carolina Maritime Museum began under the auspices of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the North Carolina Department of Conservation and Development in the 1930s. Local citizens [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina Museum of Art
by Maupin, Armistead Jones. The North Carolina Museum of Art was established in Raleigh in 1947 when the General Assembly appropriated $1 million for the purchase of Old Master paintings. By that action, North Carolina became [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina Museum of History
by Warren, Harry S. North Carolina Museum of History by Harry S. Warren, 2006 See also: Museum of the Albemarle; Museum of the Cape Fear; North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame; Museums "A ponderous key" was [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina Museum of Life and Science
by Bethea, Martha. The North Carolina Museum of Life and Science in Durham was founded in 1946 as the Children's Nature Museum. The original facility was a small trailside nature center adjacent to Northgate Park (then [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina Quilts
by . North Carolina Quilts By Kelly Agan, N.C. Government & Heritage Library, [...] (from NCpedia K-8 Collection.)
North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame
by Coffin, Alex. The North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame (NCSHF), which honors coaches, administrators, journalists, and other sports-related professionals in addition to athletes, was established in 1963 through the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Carolina Symphony
by Sherwood, Mary Bates. The North Carolina Symphony had its origins in Chapel Hill as a work relief project as part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal agencies in 1932. The first conductor was Lamar Stringfield, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North Caroliniana Society
by Jones, H. G. The North Caroliniana Society was founded in 1975 by H. G. Jones, William S. Powell, and Louis M. Connor Jr. for the promotion of knowledge and appreciation of North Carolina's historical, cultural, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
North-Carolina Museum
by Murray, Elizabeth Reid. The North-Carolina Museum was one of the names associated with a short-lived effort in Raleigh in the 1810s to gather and display an assemblage of natural and manufactured objects, curiosities, and [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
O. Henry Festival
by Williams, Jeaneane. O. Henry Festival by Jeaneane Williams, 2006 See also: Porter, William Sidney The O. Henry Festival, held annually in Greensboro in April, was founded in 1985 to commemorate the life and [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Old North State
by Williams, Wiley J., Powell, William S., Remsburg, Robert L., III. The Old North State is a nickname for North Carolina as well as the title of the state song and state toast. The moniker dates back to 1710, when the Carolina colony was effectively divided into two [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Old-Time String Band Music
by Simpson, Bland, Menius, Arthur, Kress, Kelly, Hicks, William. Old-Time String Band Music by Bland Simpson and William Hicks, 2006 Additional research provided by Kelly Kress and Art Menius. See also: Bluegrass Music; Country Music; Square [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Opera Houses
by Wilson, Paul F. From the mid-1870s until World War I, any building used for presenting entertainment on stage was popularly called an "opera house." The term was something of a euphemism: despite the popularity of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Peddlers
by Jones, Lu Ann. Peddlers in southern business history and lore are usually associated with antebellum northern entrepreneurs who sold clocks, tinware, and other items, but itinerant merchants were familiar figures [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Peele, William Joseph
by Walser, Richard. William Joseph Peele, lawyer and cultural leader, was born near Jackson in Northampton County, the youngest of fourteen children of Isaac (1807–91) and Nancy Thompson Cobb Peele (1812–78). He was the [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Personal Names
by Powell, William S. While naming traditions vary widely in history and among North Carolina's diverse cultural and ethnic groups, personal names in families are often used for many generations. Out of the 393,000 people [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Pirates
by Stick, David. Pirates who frequented coastal North Carolina during the early colonial period were involved in enough nefarious activities to emerge as the subjects of at least a dozen books and numerous articles [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Poet Laureate
by Craton, Lillian E. On 11 May 1935 the General Assembly of North Carolina passed a resolution empowering the governor to appoint a poet laureate for the state. The position remained empty until 1948, when outgoing [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Poetry Part 2: Modern-Day North Carolina Poets
by McFee, Philip, Kress, Kelly. Poetry by Kelly Kress and Philip McFee, 2006 Part 1: North Carolina Poets of the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries; Part 2: Modern-Day North Carolina Poets Modern-Day North Carolina [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Pottery
by Simpson-Vos, Mark, Egner, David M. North Carolina's internationally renowned pottery tradition reaches back centuries-to the time native inhabitants formed local clay into functional pots and ceremonial vessels. Archaeologists have [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Privies
by Carnes-McNaughton, Linda F. Privies—also known as latrines, loos, johns, outhouses, ajaxes, toilets, or necessaries—were typically small, separate structures associated with a larger domestic, commercial, or industrial [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Profanity
by Kenniff, Sean. The existence of profanity in North Carolina, as in other states, can be attributed to the English-speaking settlers who established themselves in the New World. Their newly attained political [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Prohibition
by Johnson, K. Todd. Prohibition by K. Todd Johnson, 2006 See also: Alcoholic Beverage Control Commission; Anti-Saloon League; Blind Tiger, Temperance Movement; Turlington [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Quilting in North Carolina
by Bell-Kite, Diana. The history of quiltmaking in North Carolina spans four centuries and has been shaped by Tar Heels of nearly every ethnic group and social class. At its simplest, quilting involves stitching or tying [...] (from North Carolina Museum of History.)
Quilting Part I: 18th Century - Antebellum
by Bell-Kite, Diana. Quilting Part I: 18th Century to Antebellum Era By Diana Bell-Kite, North Carolina Museum of History, 2015 See also: Quilting: Introduction; Quilting: Civil War & Postwar [...] (from North Carolina Museum of History.)
Quilting Part II: The Civil War & Postwar Era
by . Quilting Part II: The Civil War Era By Diana Bell-Kite, North Carolina Museum of History, 2015 See also: Quilting: Introduction; Quilting: 18th Century to Antebellum [...] (from North Carolina Museum of History.)
Quilting Part III: 1880s to 1920s
by Bell-Kite, Diana. Quilting Part III: 1880s to 1920s By Diana Bell-Kite, North Carolina Museum of History, 2015   See also: Quilting: Introduction; Quilting: 18th Century [...] (from North Carolina Museum of History.)
Quilting Part IV: The Great Depression
by Bell-Kite, Diana. Quilting Part IV: The Great Depression By Diana Bell-Kite, North Carolina Museum of History, 2015   See also: Quilting: Introduction; Quilting: 18th Century to [...] (from North Carolina Museum of History.)
Quilting Part V: 20th Century and 1970s Revival
by Bell-Kite, Diana. Quilting Part V: 20th Century and 1970s Revival By Diana Bell-Kite, North Carolina Museum of History, 2015   See also: Quilting: Introduction; Quilting: 18th Century [...] (from North Carolina Museum of History.)
Quilting Part VI: 21st Century and Beyond
by Bell-Kite, Diana. Quilting Part VI: 21st Century and Beyond By Diana Bell-Kite, North Carolina Museum of History, 2015   See also: Quilting: Introduction; Quilting: 18th Century to [...] (from North Carolina Museum of History.)
Quilts
by Lewis, Johanna Miller. Quilts, in textile terminology, consist of two layers of fabric, frequently with some form of batting or stuffing sandwiched between them, held together by ties or stitched designs. In early North [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Regionalism
by Williams, Wiley J. After the Civil War ended and Reconstruction had run its course, many southerners looked ahead to a brighter future. In the late 1920s and early 1930s, there emerged two disparate views on how the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Rural Community: North Carolina 1820-1870
by Parramore, Thomas C., Watson, Harry L., Nathans, Sydney, Anderson, Jean Bradley, Clayton, Thomas H., Fenn, Elizabeth A., Wood, Peter H. By Elizabeth A. Fenn, Peter H. Wood, Harry L. Watson, Thomas H. Clayton, Sydney Nathans, Thomas C. Parramore, and Jean B. Anderson; Maps by Mark Anderson Moore. Edited by Joe A. Mobley. [...] (from The Way We Lived in North Carolina, NC Office of Archives and History and UNC Press.)
Sawtooth Center for Visual Art
by Kress, Kelly. The Sawtooth Center for Visual Art, an arts education facility located in downtown Winston-Salem in a renovated 1910 textile mill with a distinctive jagged roofline, serves the Triad community [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Scalawag
by McKinney, Gordon B. "Scalawag" was the derogatory nickname used by conservative southern whites to describe other southern whites who were active members of the Republican Party during Reconstruction. In North Carolina, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Scotch Fair
by Wright, Marilyn. In the early 1800s, the Sandhills region of North Carolina faced considerable obstacles to economic prosperity. There was only one river of any consequence in the area, the Cape Fear, which ran along [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Scottish Settlers
by Troxler, George W., Cain, Robert J., Norris, David A., Johnson, Lloyd. Scottish Settlers by Robert J. Cain, 2006 Additional research provided by Lloyd Johnson, David A. Norris, and George W. Troxler. See also: Argyll Colony; Crofter Immigration; Gaelic [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Seasoning Period
by Powell, William S. "Seasoning period" is a term describing a time endured by many newcomers to North Carolina and other colonies in the South during which they became acclimated to the weather and living conditions. [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Shad Festival
by Neill, Rosemary Clifford. Shad Festival by Rosemary Clifford Neill, 2006 See also: Festivals: North Carolina Official [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Shag Dancing
by Baxley, Laura Young. The shag is a popular dance most commonly associated with the beach towns of NorthCarolina and South Carolina. It is a two-person, male-led dance with a basic step that allows much room for [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Shape-Note Singing
by Foote, Margaret. Shape-Note Singing by Margaret Foote, 2006 Shape-note singing is a form of American choral music developed in the early nineteenth century and still sung in sections of the southeastern United [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Shivaree
by Wright, Marilyn. Shivaree by Marilyn Wright, 2006 Shivaree, or chivaree, was a traditional Mountain folk custom staged during the first night that a bride and groom, following the honeymoon, moved into their [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Shooting in the New Year
by Cherry, Kevin. Shooting in the New Year by Kevin Cherry, 2006 Shooting in the New Year, although thought to have been more widespread in North Carolina during the colonial and antebellum eras (the Moravians [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Smokehouses
by Bullard, Brian. Smokehouses by Brian Bullard, 2006 See also: Women of Somerset Place; Somerset Place Smokehouses, sometimes called meat houses, have been used in North Carolina since the early 1700s as a [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art
by Kress, Kelly. The Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art (SECCA), located in Winston-Salem, serves as a nonprofit community resource and revolving exhibit space for American contemporary art. SECCA is dedicated [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Southern Folklife Collection
by Baker, Bruce E. The Southern Folklife Collection (SFC) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is among the leading folklife archives in the country, containing extensive documentary material for southern [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Southern Highland Craft Guild
by Cross, Dennis W. The Southern Highland Craft Guild (SHCG) was established in 1930 and has worked steadily since then to document, encourage, support, and exhibit the handicrafts of the people of North Carolina and [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Square Dancing
by Rohr, Karl. Square Dancing by Karl Rohr, 2006 See Also: Country Music Square dancing in North Carolina is inseparably linked to the history and culture of the state's Mountain region. The earliest [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
State Art Society
by Williams, Wiley J. The North Carolina State Art Society, precursor to the North Carolina Museum of Art, began with the work of the North Carolina Literary and Historical Association, a private organization founded by [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
State Historic Sites Program
by Knapp, Richard F. The State Historic Sites Program began as a small operation in the North Carolina Department of Archives and History in Raleigh in October 1955. When the program was created, the General Assembly [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Step Dancing
by Moore, Cecelia. Step Dancing by Cecelia Moore, 2006 Step dancing, or "soulstepping," is a form of competitive dance exhibition developed by African American fraternities and sororities in North Carolina and [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Strolling Players
by Powell, William S. Strolling Players by William S. Powell, 2006 Strolling players consisting of actors, musicians, jugglers, comedians, and other entertainers who moved about from place to place to perform [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Suicide
by Mazzocchi, Jay. Historically, suicide has occurred less frequently in the South than in any other region of the nation. This has been viewed as a consequence of southern culture, with its traditional emphasis on [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Sundials
by Powell, William S. Evidence of the use of sundials in North Carolina has been found as early as the colonial period. In May 1772 it was noted that Christian Gottlieb Reuter intended to build two "sun clocks" for the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Swiss and Palatine Settlers
by Collins, Donald E. Swiss and Palatine Settlers by Donald E. Collins, 2006 Emigrants from Bern, Switzerland, and the German Palatinate, led by a minor Swiss nobleman, Baron Christoph von Graffenried, are credited [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Tar Heel
by Taylor, Michael W. "Tar Heel" is the nickname for a native or resident of North Carolina as well as for the state itself, which is known as the Tar Heel State. The term appears to have come into popular use after the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Temperance Movement
by Williams, Wiley J. The temperance movement in North Carolina, which had as its goal the elimination or severe restriction of alcoholic beverage consumption in the state, is often equated with the formation of [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
The June Germans
by Gaddis, Elijah. The June German once occupied a prominent place in the cultural life of eastern North Carolina. These yearly dances began in the late nineteenth century as a yearly diversion for the wealthy elites [...] (from NCpedia.)
The New Leisure: The Birth of Recreation, North Carolina 1870-1920
by Parramore, Thomas C., Watson, Harry L., Nathans, Sydney, Anderson, Jean Bradley, Clayton, Thomas H., Fenn, Elizabeth A., Wood, Peter H. By Elizabeth A. Fenn, Peter H. Wood, Harry L. Watson, Thomas H. Clayton, Sydney Nathans, Thomas C. Parramore, and Jean B. Anderson; Maps by Mark Anderson Moore. Edited by Joe A. Mobley. [...] (from The Way We Lived in North Carolina, NC Office of Archives and History and UNC Press.)
The Rural World: North Carolina 1870-1920
by Parramore, Thomas C., Watson, Harry L., Nathans, Sydney, Anderson, Jean Bradley, Clayton, Thomas H., Fenn, Elizabeth A., Wood, Peter H. By Elizabeth A. Fenn, Peter H. Wood, Harry L. Watson, Thomas H. Clayton, Sydney Nathans, Thomas C. Parramore, and Jean B. Anderson; Maps by Mark Anderson Moore. Edited by Joe A. Mobley. [...] (from The Way We Lived in North Carolina, NC Office of Archives and History and UNC Press.)
Theatre, Flat Rock Playhouse
by Kemp, Amy. State Theatre of North Carolina: Flat Rock Playhouse by Amy Kemp, 2017 Government and Herigate Library See also: North Carolina State Symbols and Official Adoptions main [...] (from Government & Heritage Library, State Library of North Carolina.)
Tombstones
by DiNome, William G. Because of a lack of native stone in the coastal region where European settlement began, the earliest North Carolina grave site memorials were stakes or crosses made of wood, especially cypress, and [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Town Documentaries
by Albright, Alex. Town documentaries were films made for the entertainment or promotion of small North Carolina towns from about 1913 to the early 1950s. Hundreds of these films recorded events such as athletic [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Turlington Act
by Cashion, Jerry C. Turlington Act by Jerry C. Cashion, 2006 See Also: Prohibition; Temperance Movement; Anti-Saloon League; Alcoholic Beverage Control Commission In 1923 Zebulon Vance Turlington [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Urban Magnet: Towns and Cities in North Carolina, 1870-1920
by Parramore, Thomas C., Watson, Harry L., Nathans, Sydney, Anderson, Jean Bradley, Clayton, Thomas H., Fenn, Elizabeth A., Wood, Peter H. By Elizabeth A. Fenn, Peter H. Wood, Harry L. Watson, Thomas H. Clayton, Sydney Nathans, Thomas C. Parramore, and Jean B. Anderson; Maps by Mark Anderson Moore. Edited by Joe A. Mobley. [...] (from The Way We Lived in North Carolina, NC Office of Archives and History and UNC Press.)
Valentiner, William Reinhold
by Cotten, Alice R. Valentiner, William Reinhold by Alice R. Cotten, 1996 2 May 1880–6 Sept. [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Visual Arts- Part 1: Introduction
by Massengill, Stephen E., Williford, Jo Ann, Baker, Bruce E., McFee, Philip, Caldwell, Martha Belle. Visual Arts by Bruce E. Baker and Martha Belle Caldwell, 2006 Additional research provided by Philip McFee, Stephen E. Massengill, and Jo Ann Williford. See also: Black Mountain College; [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Visual Arts- Part 2: Early North Carolina Painting and Portraiture
by Massengill, Stephen E., Williford, Jo Ann, Baker, Bruce E., McFee, Philip, Caldwell, Martha Belle. Visual Arts by Bruce E. Baker and Martha Belle Caldwell, 2006 Additional research provided by Philip McFee, Stephen E. Massengill, and Jo Ann Williford. See also: Black Mountain College; [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Visual Arts- Part 3: A Growing Artistic Community in the State
by Massengill, Stephen E., Williford, Jo Ann, Baker, Bruce E., McFee, Philip, Caldwell, Martha Belle. Visual Arts by Bruce E. Baker and Martha Belle Caldwell, 2006 Additional research provided by Philip McFee, Stephen E. Massengill, and Jo Ann Williford. See also: Black Mountain College; [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Visual Arts- Part 4: Producing and Teaching Art in North Carolina Colleges and Universities
by Massengill, Stephen E., Williford, Jo Ann, Baker, Bruce E., McFee, Philip, Caldwell, Martha Belle. Visual Arts by Bruce E. Baker and Martha Belle Caldwell, 2006 Additional research provided by Philip McFee, Stephen E. Massengill, and Jo Ann Williford. See also: Black Mountain College; [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Visual Arts- Part 5: The Evolution of Photography
by Massengill, Stephen E., Williford, Jo Ann, Baker, Bruce E., McFee, Philip, Caldwell, Martha Belle. Visual Arts by Bruce E. Baker and Martha Belle Caldwell, 2006 Additional research provided by Philip McFee, Stephen E. Massengill, and Jo Ann Williford. See also: Black Mountain College; [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Visual Arts- Part 6: North Carolina Art Museums, Exhibits, and Centers
by Massengill, Stephen E., Williford, Jo Ann, Baker, Bruce E., McFee, Philip, Caldwell, Martha Belle. Visual Arts by Bruce E. Baker and Martha Belle Caldwell, 2006 Additional research provided by Philip McFee, Stephen E. Massengill, and Jo Ann Williford. See also: Black Mountain College; [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Weaving
by Lewis, Johanna Miller. Weaving, the process of producing textiles on a loom, in North Carolina dates back to the colonial period of the state's history. From that time into the early nineteenth century, weaving functioned [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Williams, Cratis Dearl
by Jones, H. G. Cratis Dearl Williams, folklorist, ballad collector and singer, linguist, professor, and college administrator, rose from humble beginnings in the Caines Creek community of Big Sandy Valley in [...] (from Dictionary of North Carolina Biography, University of North Carolina Press.)
Witchcraft
by Powell, William S. Belief in witchcraft influenced people for hundreds of years, and many unexplained occurrences were considered supernatural in origin. In America, the New England colonies were the scene of notorious [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Womanless Weddings
by Kobrin, Lisa Brantley. Womanless weddings, often staged by men's civic and fraternal groups, were popular entertainment in North Carolina and other southern states prior to the advent of television. They consisted of a [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Woodcarving
by Weidman, Rich. Woodcarving evolved into a true art form among North Carolinians, with works ranging from intricate caricatures and animals popular with the Cherokee and Mountain people to decoys carved by duck [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Work Songs
by Baker, Bruce E. Work Songs by Bruce E. Baker, 2006 See also: Menhaden Chanteymen. Work songs are sung as an accompaniment to work, primarily manual labor. They are usually traditional in nature, [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
World's Columbian Exposition
by Norris, David A. In 1892 the United States celebrated the 400th anniversary of Christopher Columbus's first voyage and the following year staged the World's Columbian Exposition, held in Chicago from May to November [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
Yeomen
by Powell, William S. Yeomen constituted a class of people in colonial society that generally owned and worked their own land, ranking below the gentry in the social order. The term was applied in North Carolina to the [...] (from Encyclopedia of North Carolina, University of North Carolina Press.)
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